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Meeting Report
The 2nd Meeting of National Control Laboratories for Vaccines and Biologicals in the Western Pacific
Hokyung Oh, Jinho Shin, Chung Keel Lee, Masaki Ochiai, Kiyoko Nojima, Chang Kweng Lim, Sanj Raut, Irene Lisovsky, Stella Williams, Ki Young Yoo, Dong-Yeop Shin, Manabu Ato, Qiang Ye, Kiwon Han, Chulhyun Lee, Naery Lee, Ji Young Hong, Kikyung Jung, Pham Van Hung, Jayoung Jeong
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2018;9(3):133-139.   Published online June 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2018.9.3.10
  • 2,941 View
  • 98 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF

The Second Meeting of the National Control Laboratories for Vaccines and Biologicals in the Western Pacific, was jointly organized by the National Institute of Food and Drug Safety Evaluation of the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety in the Republic of Korea, and by the World Health Organization Regional Office for the Western Pacific.

In the National Lot Release Systems session countries including Canada, China, Japan, Malaysia, Vietnam, and the Republic of Korea, all shared information on their current Lot Release Systems, including current practices and developments in risk-based official lot release of vaccines.

In the session on Quality Control of Blood Products, experts from the National Institute for Biological Standards and Control shared quality control and research results for; blood coagulation factor VIII products, and the measurement of procoagulant activity in immunoglobulin products. Representatives from Japan proposed a regional collaborative study to test aggregated immunoglobulin free from complement activity. A cell-based Japanese encephalitis vaccine potency assay was proposed by representatives from Korea and they also called for voluntary participation of other National Control Laboratories in a collaborative study, on the first Korean Gloydius anti-venom standard. Participants agreed in general to continue communicating, and coordinate presentation of the study results.

Brief Reports
Review of the Incidence of Japanese Encephalitis in Foreign-Born and Korean Nationals Living in the Republic of Korea, 2007–2016
Een-Suk Shin, Ok Park, In-Sik Kong
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2018;9(3):126-129.   Published online June 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2018.9.3.08
  • 3,114 View
  • 99 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

The Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccine was introduced to the national immunization program in 1985, which has led to a dramatic decrease in the number of reported cases, but JE continues to occur in foreign nationals residing in or traveling to Korea. Although the incidence is low, this study demonstrated that more Koreans were infected with JE than foreign-born expatriates. The incidence rates of Korean-born nationals were between 0.01 and 0.08 cases per 100,000. In contrast, the incidence rates of foreign-born nationals ranged between 0 and 0.26 cases per 100,000. The incidence rates clearly showed that foreign-born expatriates were more at risk, which underscores the importance of vaccination. We recommend heightened surveillance among JE-susceptible individuals and promote vaccination among foreign-born nationals living in Korea.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Retention of neutralizing antibodies to Japanese encephalitis vaccine in age groups above fifteen years in Korea
    Hee-Jung Lee, Hanul Choi, Ki Hoon Park, Yuyeon Jang, Young-jin Hong, Young Bong Kim
    International Journal of Infectious Diseases.2020; 100: 53.     CrossRef
  • Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices
    Susan L. Hills, Emmanuel B. Walter, Robert L. Atmar, Marc Fischer, Emmanuel Walter, Robert L. Atmar, Elizabeth Barnett, Alan Barrett, Joseph A. Bocchini, Lin Chen, Eric Deussing, Doran Fink, Michael Holbrook, Myron Levin, Anthony Marfin, Cody Meissner, Ro
    MMWR. Recommendations and Reports.2019; 68(2): 1.     CrossRef
Comparison of the Epidemiological Aspects of Imported Dengue Cases between Korea and Japan, 2006–2010
Young Eui Jeong, Won-Chang Lee, Jung Eun Cho, Myung-Guk Han, Won-Ja Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2016;7(1):71-74.   Published online February 28, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2015.12.001
  • 1,891 View
  • 17 Download
  • 12 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
To compare the epidemiological characteristics of dengue cases imported by travelers or immigration in both Korea and Japan, we determined dengue incidence and related risk factors. During 2006–2010, 367 and 589 imported dengue cases were reported in Korea and Japan, respectively. In Korea, the presumptive origins for the dengue infections were Southeast Asia (82.6%), Southern Asia (13.9%), Eastern Asia (1.1%), South America (0.3%), Central America (0.3%), Africa (0.3%), and other countries (1.6%). In Japan, the origins of the infections were Southeast Asia (69.8%), Southern Asia (20.0%), Eastern Asia (1.7%), South America (2.5%), Central America (1.2%), Africa (1.2%), Oceania (2.4%), and other countries (1.2%). In both countries, more dengue cases were reported for men than for women (p < 0.01), and those aged 20–30 years accounted for > 60% of the total cases. The frequency of imported cases in summer and autumn (∼70% of total cases) was similar in both countries. This study demonstrates that there is a similar pattern of imported dengue cases in Korea and Japan. Therefore, there is a risk of an autochthonous dengue outbreak in Korea, as indicated by the recent outbreak in Japan in 2014.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Molecular and Haematological Analysis of Dengue Virus-3 Among Children in Lahore, Pakistan
    Muhammad Kashif, Muhammad Afzal, Basit Zeshan, Hasnain Javed, Salma Batool, Modasrah Mazhar
    Jundishapur Journal of Microbiology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Scientific Reports.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Myung-Jae Hwang, Jong-Hun Kim, Heung-Chul Kim, Myung Soon Kim, Terry A Klein, Juhwa Choi, Kisung Sim, Yeonseung Chung, Yadav Prasad Joshi, Hae-Kwan Cheong, Kristen Healy
    Journal of Medical Entomology.2020; 57(4): 1082.     CrossRef
  • A Two-Patch Mathematical Model for Temperature-Dependent Dengue Transmission Dynamics
    Jung Kim, Yongin Choi, James Kim, Sunmi Lee, Chang Lee
    Processes.2020; 8(7): 781.     CrossRef
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    Hyojung Lee, Jung Eun Kim, Sunmi Lee, Chang Hyeong Lee, Shamala Devi Sekaran
    PLOS ONE.2018; 13(6): e0199205.     CrossRef
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    Muhammad Yousaf, Kashaf Junaid, Muhammad Sarfaraz Iqbal, Imran Aslam, Sheraz Ahmad, Muhammad Aqeel, Usman Ali Ashfaq, Saba Khaliq, Muhammad Usman Ghani, Nayyar Waqar
    Future Virology.2018; 13(4): 245.     CrossRef
  • Seroprevalence of Toxoplasmosis with ELISA and Rapid Diagnostic Test among Residents in Gyodong-do, Inchon city, Korea: A Four-Year Follow-up
    Yeong Hoon Kim, Ji hoo Lee, Seong kyu Ahn, Tong-Soo Kim, Sung-Jong Hong, Chom-Kyu Chong, Hye-Jin Ahn, Ho-Woo Nam
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  • A Disease Around the Corner
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2016; 7(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • WITHDRAWN: A disease around the corner
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
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Original Articles
Comparison of Four Serological Tests for Detecting Antibodies to Japanese Encephalitis Virus after Vaccination in Children
Go Woon Cha, Jung Eun Cho, Young Ran Ju, Young-Jin Hong, Myung Guk Han, Won-Ja Lee, Eui Yul Choi, Young Eui Jeong
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(5):286-291.   Published online October 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.08.003
  • 2,189 View
  • 20 Download
  • 14 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Several different methods are currently used to detect antibodies to Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) in serum samples or cerebrospinal fluid. These methods include the plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT), the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test, indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA), and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of each method in detecting vaccine-induced antibodies to JEV.
Methods
The study included 29 children who had completed a primary immunization schedule with an inactivated vaccine against JEV derived from mouse brain (n = 15) or a live attenuated SA14-14-2 vaccine (n = 14). Serum samples were collected between 3 months and 47 months after the last immunization. The serum samples were tested by performing the PRNT, HI test, in-house IFA, and commercial ELISA. The antibody detection rates were compared between tests.
Results
All 29 serum samples were positive with the PRNT, showing antibody titers from 1:20 to 1:2560. The HI test showed positive rates of 86.7% (13/15) and 71.4% (10/14) in the inactivated and live attenuated vaccine groups, respectively. The results of the IFA for immunoglobulin (Ig)G were positive in 53.3% (8/15) of children in the inactivated vaccine group and 35.7% (5/14) in the live attenuated vaccine group. Neither the IFA nor ELISA detected JEV IgM antibodies in any of the 29 children.
Conclusion
These results show that detection rates of vaccine-induced antibodies to JEV have a wide range (0–100%) depending on the testing method as well as the time since immunization and individual differences between children. These findings are helpful in interpreting serological test results for the diagnosis of Japanese encephalitis in situations where vaccines are widely administered.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A review on Japanese Encephalitis virus emergence, pathogenesis and detection: From conventional diagnostics to emerging rapid detection techniques
    Fatima Mohsin, Shariq Suleman, Nigar Anzar, Jagriti Narang, Shikha Wadhwa
    International Journal of Biological Macromolecules.2022; 217: 435.     CrossRef
  • Recent pharmaceutical engineered trends as theranostics for Japanese encephalitis
    Akshada Mhaske, Sanjiv Singh, Mohammed A.S. Abourehab, Akhilesh Kumar, Prashant Kesharwani, Rahul Shukla
    Process Biochemistry.2022; 122: 115.     CrossRef
  • Immunogenicity of a single fractional intradermal dose of Japanese encephalitis live attenuated chimeric vaccine
    Luis Furuya-Kanamori, Narayan Gyawali, Deborah J Mills, Christine Mills, Leon E Hugo, Gregor J Devine, Colleen L Lau
    Journal of Travel Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Biochimie.2021; 180: 54.     CrossRef
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    Kiran Bala Sharma, Sudhanshu Vrati, Manjula Kalia
    Molecular Aspects of Medicine.2021; 81: 100994.     CrossRef
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    Gna Ahn, Se Hee Lee, Min-Suk Song, Beom-Ku Han, Yang-Hoon Kim, Ji-Young Ahn
    Microchimica Acta.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Filgueira, Lannes
    Pathogens.2019; 8(3): 111.     CrossRef
  • Seroprevalence of Dengue Virus Antibody in Korea
    Ji Hyen Lee, Han Wool Kim, Kyung-Hyo Kim
    Pediatric Infection & Vaccine.2018; 25(3): 132.     CrossRef
  • Japanese Encephalitis: A Brief Review on Indian Perspectives
    Reshma Kulkarni, Gajanan N. Sapkal, Himanshu Kaushal, Devendra T. Mourya
    The Open Virology Journal.2018; 12(1): 121.     CrossRef
  • Clinical Characteristics of Severe Japanese Encephalitis: A Case Series from South Korea
    Kyung-Il Park, Manho Kim, Jun-Sang Sunwoo, Ki-Young Jung, Kon Chu, Keun-Hwa Jung, Sang Kun Lee, Soon-Tae Lee, Jangsup Moon
    The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygi.2017; 97(2): 369.     CrossRef
  • JAPANESE ENCEPHALITIS, RECENT PERSPECTIVES ON VIRUS GENOME, TRANSMISSION, EPIDEMIOLOGY, DIAGNOSIS AND PROPHYLACTIC INTERVENTIONS
    Arumugam Karthikeyan, Subramaniyan Shanmuganathan, Selvaraj Pavulraj, Govinthasamy Prabakar, Selvaraj Pavithra, Kannan Porteen, Govindaraj Elaiyaraja, Yashpal Singh Malik
    Journal of Experimental Biology and Agricultural S.2017; 5(6): 730.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of Neutralizing Antibodies to Japanese Encephalitis Virus among High-Risk Age Groups in South Korea, 2010
    Eun Ju Lee, Go-Woon Cha, Young Ran Ju, Myung Guk Han, Won-Ja Lee, Young Eui Jeong, Nagendra R Hegde
    PLOS ONE.2016; 11(1): e0147841.     CrossRef
  • A Novel Immunochromatographic Test Applied to a Serological Survey of Japanese Encephalitis Virus on Pig Farms in Korea
    Go-Woon Cha, Eun Ju Lee, Eun-Joo Lim, Kang Suk Sin, Woo Won Park, Doo Young Jeon, Myung Guk Han, Won-Ja Lee, Woo-Young Choi, Young Eui Jeong, Lark L. Coffey
    PLOS ONE.2015; 10(5): e0127313.     CrossRef
  • Silent Circulation of Ross River Virus in French Polynesia
    Maite Aubry, Jérôme Finke, Anita Teissier, Claudine Roche, Julien Broult, Sylvie Paulous, Philippe Desprès, Van-Mai Cao-Lormeau, Didier Musso
    International Journal of Infectious Diseases.2015; 37: 19.     CrossRef
Prediction Forecast for Culex tritaeniorhynchus Populations in Korea
Nam-Hyun Kim, Wook-Gyo Lee, E-Hyun Shin, Jong Yul Roh, Hae-Chun Rhee, Mi Yeoun Park
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(3):131-137.   Published online June 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.04.004
  • 1,872 View
  • 25 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Japanese encephalitis is considered as a secondary legal infectious disease in Korea and is transmitted by mosquitoes in the summer season. The purpose of this study was to predict the ratio of Culex tritaeniorhynchus to all the species of mosquitoes present in the study regions.
Methods
From 1999 to 2012, black light traps were installed in 10 regions in Korea (Busan, Gyeonggi, Gangwon, Chungbuk, Chungnam, Jeonbuk, Jeonnam, Gyeongbuk, Gyeongnam, and Jeju) to capture mosquitoes for identification and classification under a dissecting microscope. The number of mosquitoes captured/week was used to calculate its daily occurrence (mosquitoes/trap/night). To predict the characteristics of the mosquito population, an autoregressive model of order p (AR(p)) was used to execute the out-of-sample prediction and the in-sample estimation after presumption.
Results
Compared with the out-of-sample method, the sample-weighted regression method's case was relatively superior for prediction, and this method predicted a decrease in the frequency of Cx. tritaeniorhynchus for 2013. However, the actual frequency of this species showed an increase in frequency. By contrast, the frequency rate of all the mosquitoes including Cx. tritaeniorhynchus gradually decreased.
Conclusion
The number of patients with Japanese encephalitis has been strongly associated with the occurrence and density of vector mosquitoes, and the importance of this infectious disease has been highlighted since 2010. The 2013 prediction indicated an increase after an initial decrease, although the ratio of the two mosquito species decreased. The increase in vector density may be due to changes in temperature and the environment. Thus, continuous prevalence prediction is warranted.

Citations

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  • Joint spatiotemporal modelling reveals seasonally dynamic patterns of Japanese encephalitis vector abundance across India
    Lydia H. V. Franklinos, David W. Redding, Tim C. D. Lucas, Rory Gibb, Ibrahim Abubakar, Kate E. Jones, Andrew S. Azman
    PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.2022; 16(2): e0010218.     CrossRef
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    Parasites & Vectors.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
Review Article
The Effect of Global Warming on Infectious Diseases
Ichiro Kurane
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2010;1(1):4-9.   Published online December 31, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2010.12.004
  • 2,147 View
  • 21 Download
  • 46 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Global warming has various effects on human health. The main indirect effects are on infectious diseases. Although the effects on infectious diseases will be detected worldwide, the degree and types of the effect are different, depending on the location of the respective countries and socioeconomical situations.Among infectious diseases, water- and foodborne infectious diseases and vector-borne infectious diseases are two main categories that are forecasted to be most affected. The effect on vector-borne infectious diseases such as malaria and dengue fever is mainly because of the expansion of the infested areas of vector mosquitoes and increase in the number and feeding activity of infected mosquitoes. There will be increase in the number of cases with water- and foodborne diarrhoeal diseases.Even with the strongest mitigation procedures, global warming cannot be avoided for decades. Therefore, implementation of adaptation measures to the effect of global warming is the most practical action we can take. It is generally accepted that the impacts of global warming on infectious diseases have not been apparent at this point yet in East Asia. However, these impacts will appear in one form or another if global warming continues to progress in future. Further research on the impacts of global warming on infectious diseases and on future prospects should be conducted.

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PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives