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Original Articles
Characteristics of hand-to-environment contact during indoor activities in daily life among Korean adults using a video-based observation method
Hyang Soon Oh, Mikyung Ryu, Youngran Yang
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(3):187-195.   Published online June 8, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0006
  • 3,132 View
  • 76 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of hand-to-environmental contact (HEC) and to identify the factors influencing HEC behavior in Korean adults’ indoor daily life.
Methods
Thirty participants were enrolled from January 14 to February 12, 2018 after providing informed consent for being videotaped. Data were collected by recording their indoor daily lives for 2 hours, resulting in 4,732 HEC cases. To ensure the accuracy and reliability of the HEC readings, 3 training sessions were conducted for the videotape readers. Rereading and verifying randomly selected data ensured the validity of intra- and inter-reader readings.
Results
The most frequent contact items were phones, papers, computer accessories, and furniture surfaces. The contact density (frequency-duration/min) was highest for category II (items occasionally shared by others, 56.8), followed in descending order by category I (items for individual use, 35.9), and category III (public use items, 3.4). Significant differences in contact density were found according to participants’ demographic characteristics.
Conclusion
As mobile phones were the most frequent contact item, regular and strict mobile phone cleansing or disinfection strategies are needed, in addition to preventative measures taken for category II and III items. Avoiding sharing personal items with others, refraining from unnecessary HEC, and maintaining strict hand hygiene are recommended.
Global variation of COVID-19 mortality rates in the initial phase
Saman Hasan Siddiqui, Azza Sarfraz, Arjumand Rizvi, Fariha Shaheen, Mohammad Tahir Yousafzai, Syed Asad Ali
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(2):64-72.   Published online April 29, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.12.2.03
  • 4,092 View
  • 142 Download
  • 6 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has caused devastation in over 200 countries. Italy, Spain, and the United States (US) were most severely affected by the first wave of the pandemic. The reasons why some countries were more strongly affected than others remain unknown. We identified the most-affected and less-affected countries and states and explored environmental, host, and infrastructure risk factors that may explain differences in the SARS-CoV-2 mortality burden.
Methods
We identified the top 10 countries/US states with the highest deaths per population until May 2020. For each of these 10 case countries/states, we identified 6 control countries/states with a similar population size and at least 3 times fewer deaths per population. We extracted data for 30 risk factors from publicly available, trusted sources. We compared case and control countries/states using the non-parametric Wilcoxon rank-sum test, and conducted a secondary cluster analysis to explore the relationship between the number of cases per population and the number of deaths per population using a scalable EM (expectation–maximization) clustering algorithm.
Results
Statistically significant differences were found in 16 of 30 investigated risk factors, the most important of which were temperature, neonatal and under-5 mortality rates, the percentage of under-5 deaths due to acute respiratory infections (ARIs) and diarrhea, and tuberculosis incidence (p<0.05)
Conclusion
Countries with a higher burden of baseline pediatric mortality rates, higher pediatric mortality from preventable diseases like diarrhea and ARI, and higher tuberculosis incidence had lower rates of coronavirus disease 2019-associated mortality, supporting the hygiene hypothesis.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Demographic Characteristics and Status of Vaccinated Individuals with a History of COVID-19 Infection Pre- or Post-Vaccination: A Descriptive Study of a Nationally Representative Sample in Saudi Arabia
    Yazed AlRuthia, Haya F. Al-Salloum, Omar A. Almohammed, Amani S. Alqahtani, Hana A. Al-Abdulkarim, Yousef M. Alsofayan, Sami S. Almudarra, Sara H. AlQahtani, Abdullah Almutlaq, Khaled Alabdulkareem, Bander Balkhi, Hamoud T. Almutairi, Abdullah S. Alanazi,
    Vaccines.2022; 10(2): 323.     CrossRef
  • Temporal variation, socioeconomic status, and out‐of‐hospital deaths as factors that influence mortality rates among hospitalized COVID‐19 patients receiving ACEIs/ARBs
    Owais M. Aftab, Anurag Modak, Jai C. Patel
    The Journal of Clinical Hypertension.2022; 24(4): 519.     CrossRef
  • Coinfection of leptospirosis and coronavirus disease 2019: A retrospective case series from a coastal region in South India
    Nitin Gupta, William Wilson, Prithvishree Ravindra, Roshini Raghu, Kavitha Saravu
    Journal of Medical Virology.2022; 94(9): 4508.     CrossRef
  • Dietary, comorbidity, and geo-economic data fusion for explainable COVID-19 mortality prediction
    Milena Trajanoska, Risto Trajanov, Tome Eftimov
    Expert Systems with Applications.2022; 209: 118377.     CrossRef
  • Paraoxonase 1 rs662 polymorphism, its related variables, and COVID-19 intensity: Considering gender and post-COVID complications
    Zohreh-Al-Sadat Ghoreshi, Mojtaba Abbasi-jorjandi, Gholamreza Asadikaram, Mohsen Sharif-zak, Fatemeh Seyedi, Mohammad Khaksari Haddad, Mohammadreza Zangouey
    Experimental Biology and Medicine.2022; : 153537022211285.     CrossRef
  • Variances in BCG protection against COVID-19 mortality: A global assessment
    Zouina Sarfraz, Azza Sarfraz, Krunal Pandav, Sarabjot Singh Makkar, Saman Hasan Siddiqui, Gaurav Patel, Tania Platero-Portillo, Bishnu Mohan Singh, Mohamed Iburahim Haja Maideen, Deepika Sarvepalli, Muzna Sarfraz, Jose Cardona-Guzman, Marcos A. Sanchez-Go
    Journal of Clinical Tuberculosis and Other Mycobac.2021; 24: 100249.     CrossRef
Short Communication
Detection of Novel Coronavirus on the Surface of Environmental Materials Contaminated by COVID-19 Patients in the Republic of Korea
Sang-Eun Lee, Deog-Yong Lee, Wook-Gyo Lee, ByeongHak Kang, Yoon Suk Jang, Boyeong Ryu, SeungJae Lee, Hyunjung Bahk, Eungyu Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2020;11(3):128-132.   Published online May 8, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2020.11.3.03
  • 6,918 View
  • 270 Download
  • 20 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

This study aimed to determine the presence of SARS-CoV-2 on surfaces frequently touched by COVID-19 patients, and assess the scope of contamination and transmissibility in facilities where the outbreaks occurred. In the course of this epidemiological investigation, a total of 80 environmental specimens were collected from 6 hospitals (68 specimens) and 2 “mass facilities” (6 specimens from a rehabilitation center and 6 specimens from an apartment building complex). Specific reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction targeting of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and envelope genes, were used to identify the presence of this novel coronavirus. The 68 specimens from 6 hospitals (A, B, C, D, E, and G), where prior disinfection/cleaning had been performed before environmental sampling, tested negative for SARS-CoV-2. However, 2 out of 12 specimens (16.7%) from 2 “mass facilities” (F and H), where prior disinfection/cleaning had not taken place, were positive for SARS-CoV-2 RNA polymerase, and envelope genes. These results suggest that prompt disinfection and cleaning of potentially contaminated surfaces is an effective infection control measure. By inactivating SARS-CoV-2 with disinfection/cleaning the infectivity and transmission of the virus is blocked. This investigation of environmental sampling may help in the understanding of risk assessment of the COVID-19 outbreak in “mass facilities” and provide guidance in using effective disinfectants on contaminated surfaces.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) research agenda for healthcare epidemiology
    Lona Mody, Ibukunoluwa C. Akinboyo, Hilary M. Babcock, Werner E. Bischoff, Vincent Chi-Chung Cheng, Kathleen Chiotos, Kimberly C. Claeys, K. C. Coffey, Daniel J. Diekema, Curtis J. Donskey, Katherine D. Ellingson, Heather M. Gilmartin, Shruti K. Gohil, An
    Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology.2022; 43(2): 156.     CrossRef
  • SARS-CoV-2 on Surfaces and HVAC Filters in Dormitory Rooms
    Jin Pan, Seth A. Hawks, Aaron J. Prussin, Nisha K. Duggal, Linsey C. Marr
    Environmental Science & Technology Letters.2022; 9(1): 71.     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 Cluster Linked to Aerosol Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 via Floor Drains
    Taewon Han, Heedo Park, Yungje Jeong, Jungmin Lee, Eungyeong Shon, Man-Seong Park, Minki Sung
    The Journal of Infectious Diseases.2022; 225(9): 1554.     CrossRef
  • Environmental Contamination with SARS-CoV-2 in Hospital COVID Department: Antigen Test, Real-Time RT-PCR and Virus Isolation
    Urška Rozman, Lea Knez, Goran Novak, Jernej Golob, Anita Pulko, Mojca Cimerman, Matjaž Ocepek, Urška Kuhar, Sonja Šostar Turk
    COVID.2022; 2(8): 1050.     CrossRef
  • Using Environmental Sampling to Enable Zoonotic Pandemic Preparedness
    Avirup Sanyal, Sanskriti Agarwal, Uma Ramakrishnan, Kritika M. Garg, Balaji Chattopadhyay
    Journal of the Indian Institute of Science.2022; 102(2): 711.     CrossRef
  • Anforderungen an die Hygiene bei der Reinigung und Desinfektion von Flächen

    Bundesgesundheitsblatt - Gesundheitsforschung - Ge.2022; 65(10): 1074.     CrossRef
  • SARS-CoV-2 pandemic: a review of molecular diagnostic tools including sample collection and commercial response with associated advantages and limitations
    Harikrishnan Jayamohan, Christopher J. Lambert, Himanshu J. Sant, Alexander Jafek, Dhruv Patel, Haidong Feng, Michael Beeman, Tawsif Mahmood, Ugochukwu Nze, Bruce K. Gale
    Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry.2021; 413(1): 49.     CrossRef
  • Contamination of inert surfaces by SARS-CoV-2: Persistence, stability and infectivity. A review
    Montse Marquès, José L. Domingo
    Environmental Research.2021; 193: 110559.     CrossRef
  • A Systematic Review of Surface Contamination, Stability, and Disinfection Data on SARS-CoV-2 (Through July 10, 2020)
    Noah Bedrosian, Elizabeth Mitchell, Elsa Rohm, Miguel Rothe, Christine Kelly, Gabrielle String, Daniele Lantagne
    Environmental Science & Technology.2021; 55(7): 4162.     CrossRef
  • Transmission of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 via Contaminated Surfaces: What Is to Be Done?
    Craig S Conover
    Clinical Infectious Diseases.2021; 72(11): 2062.     CrossRef
  • Investigation of SARS CoV-2 virus in environmental surface
    Abdollah Dargahi, Farhad Jeddi, Mehdi Vosoughi, Chiman Karami, Aidin Hadisi, S. Ahamad Mokhtari, Hasan Ghobadi, Morteza Alighadri, Somayeh Biparva Haghighi, Hadi Sadeghi
    Environmental Research.2021; 195: 110765.     CrossRef
  • Ist die Desinfektion öffentlicher Flächen zur Prävention von SARS-CoV-2 – infektionen sinnvoll?
    Günter Kampf, Lutz Jatzwauk
    Das Gesundheitswesen.2021; 83(03): 180.     CrossRef
  • SARS-CoV-2 Detection Rates from Surface Samples Do Not Implicate Public Surfaces as Relevant Sources for Transmission
    Günter Kampf, Stephanie Pfaender, Emanuel Goldman, Eike Steinmann
    Hygiene.2021; 1(1): 24.     CrossRef
  • The SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic in hospital: An insight into environmental surfaces contamination, disinfectants’ efficiency, and estimation of plastic waste production
    Faezeh seif, Zahra Noorimotlagh, Seyyed Abbas Mirzaee, Mojtaba Kalantar, Barat Barati, Mahdi Emamian Fard, Nozar Kalantar Fard
    Environmental Research.2021; 202: 111809.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 RNA on inanimate surfaces: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Simone Belluco, Marzia Mancin, Filippo Marzoli, Alessio Bortolami, Eva Mazzetto, Alessandra Pezzuto, Michela Favretti, Calogero Terregino, Francesco Bonfante, Roberto Piro
    European Journal of Epidemiology.2021; 36(7): 685.     CrossRef
  • Management following the first confirmed case of SARS-CoV-2 in a domestic cat associated with a massive outbreak in South Korea
    Taewon Han, Boyeong Ryu, Suyeon Lee, Yugyeong Song, Yoongje Jeong, Ilhwan Kim, Jeongmin Kim, Eunjin Kim, Wonjun Lee, Hyunju Lee, Haekyoung Hwang
    One Health.2021; 13: 100328.     CrossRef
  • Non-Respiratory Droplet Transmission of COVID-19 in the Isolation Ward of a Secondary Hospital in Oman
    Zayid K. Al Mayahi, Nawal Al Kindi, Nasser Al Shaqsi, Noaman Al Hattali, Azza Al Hattali, Khalid Salim, Mark Beatty
    Infectious Diseases in Clinical Practice.2021; 29(6): e371.     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of antiviral metal and metal oxide thin-film coatings against human coronavirus 229E
    Louis-Vincent Delumeau, Hatameh Asgarimoghaddam, Tamiru Alkie, Alexander James Bryan Jones, Samantha Lum, Kissan Mistry, Marc G. Aucoin, Stephanie DeWitte-Orr, Kevin P. Musselman
    APL Materials.2021; 9(11): 111114.     CrossRef
  • Rapid Review of SARS-CoV-1 and SARS-CoV-2 Viability, Susceptibility to Treatment, and the Disinfection and Reuse of PPE, Particularly Filtering Facepiece Respirators
    José G. B. Derraik, William A. Anderson, Elizabeth A. Connelly, Yvonne C. Anderson
    International Journal of Environmental Research an.2020; 17(17): 6117.     CrossRef
  • Potential sources, modes of transmission and effectiveness of prevention measures against SARS-CoV-2
    G. Kampf, Y. Brüggemann, H.E.J. Kaba, J. Steinmann, S. Pfaender, S. Scheithauer, E. Steinmann
    Journal of Hospital Infection.2020; 106(4): 678.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Multilevel Analysis of Socio-Demographic Disparities in Adulthood Obesity Across the United States Geographic Regions
Baksun Sung, Amin Etemadifar
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2019;10(3):137-144.   Published online June 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2019.10.3.04
  • 3,808 View
  • 50 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The objective of this study was to examine the socio-demographic disparities in obesity among US adults across 130 metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas.

Methods

This study used data from the 2015 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and Selected Metropolitan/Micropolitan Area Risk Trend of 159,827 US adults aged 18 years and older. Data were analyzed using the multilevel linear regression models.

Results

According to individual level analyses, socio-demographic disparities in obesity exist in the United States. Individuals with low socioeconomic status were associated with a higher body mass index. The participants from the Midwest United States tend to have higher body mass index than those who from the South. According to metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area level analyses, secondly, there were significant differences in obesity status between different areas and the relation of obesity with 5 socio-demographic factors varied across different areas. According to geospatial mapping analyses, even though obesity status by metropolitan and micropolitan statistical area level has improved overtime, differences in body mass index between United States regions are increasing from 2007 to 2015.

Conclusion

Socio-demographic and regional disparities in obesity status persist among US adults. Hence, these findings underscore the need to take socio-environmental factors into account when planning obesity prevention on vulnerable populations and areas.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)-Authorized Grocery, Convenience, Dollar, and Restaurant or Delivery Service Settings Are Associated With Increased Obesity Prevalence in Virginia
    Bailey Houghtaling, David Kniola, Sarah Misyak
    American Journal of Health Promotion.2021; 35(1): 127.     CrossRef
  • The effects of the built environment on the general health, physical activity and obesity of adults in Queensland, Australia
    Siqin Wang, Yan Liu, Jack Lam, Mei-Po Kwan
    Spatial and Spatio-temporal Epidemiology.2021; 39: 100456.     CrossRef
  • Exposure to air pollutants and the gut microbiota: a potential link between exposure, obesity, and type 2 diabetes
    Maximillian J. Bailey, Noopur N. Naik, Laura E. Wild, William B. Patterson, Tanya L. Alderete
    Gut Microbes.2020; 11(5): 1188.     CrossRef
Associations between Social and Physical Environments, and Physical Activity in Adults from Urban and Rural Regions
Bongjeong Kim, Hye Sun Hyun
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2018;9(1):16-24.   Published online December 31, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2018.9.1.04
  • 3,734 View
  • 42 Download
  • 6 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study investigates investigated the relationship between social and physical environments, and moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) amongst adults in both rural and urban areas within Korea.

Methods

A sample of 128,735 adults from the 2013 Community Health Survey (CHS) was analyzed using a multilevel logistic analysis.

Results

Urban residents with higher satisfaction in public transportation satisfaction and rural residents with more access to sports parks, hiking trails, and bike cycle paths were more likely to be active. The MVPA of adults from rural areas correlated urban adults was uncorrelatedwith neighborhood factors, but that of rural adults was whereas no correlations were observed in adults from urban areas.

Conclusion

These differences should be considered when developing interventions strategies to enhance adult physical activity in different communities.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Neighborhood Environmental Factors and Physical Activity Status among Rural Older Adults in Japan
    Kenta Okuyama, Takafumi Abe, Xinjun Li, Yuta Toyama, Kristina Sundquist, Toru Nabika
    International Journal of Environmental Research an.2021; 18(4): 1450.     CrossRef
  • Youth’s Physical Activity and Fitness from a Rural Environment of an Azores Island
    João Pedro Gouveia, Pedro Forte, Eduarda Coelho
    Social Sciences.2021; 10(3): 96.     CrossRef
  • The Changes in Obesity Prevalence and Dietary Habits in Korean Adults by Residential Area during the Last 10 Years — Based on the 4th (2007–2009) and the 7th (2016–2018) Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Data
    Da-Mee Kim, Kyung-Hee Kim
    Korean Journal of Community Nutrition.2021; 26(1): 37.     CrossRef
  • Regional Disparity in Adult Obesity Prevalence, and Its Determinants
    Bongjeong Kim
    Journal of Health Informatics and Statistics.2021; 46(4): 410.     CrossRef
  • Factors Affecting Activity Limitation in the Elderly: Data Processed from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2016
    Jong-Hoon Moon
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2019; 10(3): 117.     CrossRef
  • Corrigendum to “Associations between Social and Physical Environments, and Physical Activity in Adults from Urban and Rural Regions”[Osong Public Health Res Perspect 2018;9(1):16–24]
    Bongjeong Kim, Hye Sun Hyun
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2018; 9(5): 283.     CrossRef
A Retrospective Mid- and Long-term Follow-up Study on the Changes in Hematologic Parameters in the Highly Exposed Residents of the Hebei Spirit Oil Spill in Taean, South Korea
Young-Hyun Choi, Jee-Young Hong, Moo-Sik Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2017;8(5):358-366.   Published online October 31, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2017.8.5.10
  • 2,995 View
  • 23 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study aimed to analyze changes in hematologic parameters in the residents of the areas highly contaminated by the Hebei Spirit Oil Spill in 2007 and those who participated in the clean-up activities.

Methods

According to demographic characteristics, health status and behavior, and level of exposure to oil, we compared the hematologic results in 2009 and 2012 among 701 residents. The hematologic parameters were composed of white blood cell (WBC) count, and levels of hemoglobin, hematocrit (Hct), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (Cr), total cholesterol (T-chol), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and triglyceride (TG).

Results

Paired t-test revealed that the WBC count and levels of Hct, AST, ALT, glucose, and HbA1c significantly increased, whereas the BUN, Cr, HDL, and TG levels significantly decreased. Multiple linear regression modelling showed a relationship between the level of exposure to oil and temporal changes in Hct, glucose, HbA1c, and BUN levels.

Conclusion

Our results suggest a relationship between level of exposure to oil and changes in hematologic parameters over 3 years. Further studies should be conducted to determine the impact of oil spill on health such as the occurrence of diseases.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Haematological, renal, and hepatic function changes among Rayong oil spill clean-up workers: a longitudinal study
    Benjamin Atta Owusu, Apiradee Lim, Chanthip Intawong, Sunthorn Rheanpumikankit, Saijit Suksri, Thammasin Ingviya
    International Archives of Occupational and Environ.2022; 95(7): 1481.     CrossRef
  • Association between BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene) concentration in ambient air with hematological and spirometric indices: a population-based study
    Hosna Moradkhani, Mostafa Leili, Jalal Puralajal, Ashraf Mazaheri Tehrani, Ayat Hossein Panahi, Mohammd Taghi Samadi, Sara Beheshtifar
    Human and Ecological Risk Assessment: An Internati.2022; 28(5-6): 490.     CrossRef
  • Combine effect of exposure to petrol, kerosene and diesel fumes: On hepatic oxidative stress and haematological function in rats
    Solomon E Owumi, Bidemi N Oladimeji, Tobiloba C Elebiyo, Uche O Arunsi
    Toxicology and Industrial Health.2021; 37(6): 336.     CrossRef
  • Associations between blood volatile organic compounds, and changes in hematologic and biochemical profiles, in a population-based study
    Sabit Cakmak, Christie Cole, Chris Hebbern, Julie Andrade, Robert Dales
    Environment International.2020; 145: 106121.     CrossRef
  • Developing Large-Scale Research in Response to an Oil Spill Disaster: a Case Study
    Richard K. Kwok, Aubrey K. Miller, Kaitlyn B. Gam, Matthew D. Curry, Steven K. Ramsey, Aaron Blair, Lawrence S. Engel, Dale P. Sandler
    Current Environmental Health Reports.2019; 6(3): 174.     CrossRef
Do Factors Associated Self-rated Good Health and Their Influences Differ between Males and Females across Different Age Groups in Korean and Australia?
Hyo Young Lee, Stephanie Doris Short
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2017;8(1):11-25.   Published online February 28, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2017.8.1.03
  • 3,269 View
  • 19 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This was a comparative study between Australia and Korea that investigated whether and to what extent factors related to self-rated good health (SRGH) differ by gender among age groups.

Methods

This study was a secondary analysis of data that were collected in nationally representative, cross-sectional, and population-based surveys. We analyzed Australian and Korean participants > 20 years of age using 2011 data from the Australian National Nutritional Physical Activity Survey (n = 9,276) and the Korean National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (n = 5,915). Analyses were based on multiple logistic regression after controlling for covariates.

Results

Factors associated with SRGH and the extent of their influence differed by gender among age groups within each nation. Australian SRGH was associated with more factors than Korean SRGH, except in participants > 65 years old. Many differences among adults aged 20–44 years were observed, particularly with regard to the influence of socioeconomic factors. Living with a spouse only influenced SRGH in men 20–44 years old in both countries, negatively for Korean men and positively for Australian men. In this same age group, SRGH was positively influenced by employment and attainment of a higher education level in Australian men but not among Korean men; among women, income, but not education, affected SRGH in Korea, whereas in Australia, women were more influenced by education than by income. Lack of chronic disease had a strong influence on SRGH in both countries and was influential in all Australians and Koreans except those ≥ 65 years old.

Conclusion

Broad features of society should be considered when discussing health and differences in associated factors and their influences. For focused public health interventions of population groups, it is also necessary to consider gender and age groups within social environments.

Citations

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  • The effects of medication adherence and health literacy on health-related quality of life in older people with hypertension
    Nam Hee Park, Mi Sook Song, So Young Shin, Ji-hye Jeong, Hyo Young Lee
    International Journal of Older People Nursing.2018; 13(3): e12196.     CrossRef
Smoking and Alcohol Drinking Related to Experience of Harmful Shops among Korean Adolescents
Jinyoung Kim, Aeree Sohn
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(3):138-147.   Published online June 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.04.005
  • 1,872 View
  • 16 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study was conducted in order to determine any correlation between experience of harmful shops and adolescent smoking and alcohol drinking in middle and high school students.
Methods
The survey was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire online via the homepage of the Ministry of Education student Health Information Center; 1888 and 1563 questionnaires were used for middle and high school students, respectively, for a total of 3451 questionnaires in the final analysis. The collected data were processed using SPSS version 21.0 and examined using frequency analysis and hierarchical linear regression.
Results
In this research, 8.3% of all participants were found to have experienced smoking and 17.0% alcohol drinking. Regarding the types of harmful shops, 81.8% said they had been to a gaming place; 21.2% to a lodging place; 16.0% to a sex and entertainment place; and 6.8% to a harmful sex industry location. Sociodemographic variables had a significant effect on adolescent smoking and alcohol drinking. Regarding environmental variables, a significant difference was observed for living with parents and school location. Among adolescent experience of harmful shops, both smoking and alcohol drinking showed a significant association with harmful sex industry locations.
Conclusion
National government-level management and supervision on this issue will be necessary to prevent adolescent access to harmful shops, along with more studies exploring methods for implementation of policies with more systematic control of harmful shops.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Evaluation of Individual and Community Factors Affecting Adolescents’ Mental Health: A Longitudinal Multilevel Analysis
    Bohye Lee, Myungsuk Choi, Mankyu Choi
    Applied Research in Quality of Life.2021; 16(3): 1187.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and Extrinsic Risk Factors for Dental Erosion in Adolescents
    Ana C Mafla, Ximena A Cerón-Bastidas, Maria E Munoz-Ceballos, Diana C Vallejo-Bravo, Maria C Fajardo-Santacruz
    Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry.2017; 41(2): 102.     CrossRef
  • Trend of Suicide Rates According to Urbanity among Adolescents by Gender and Suicide Method in Korea, 1997–2012
    Kyung-Hwa Choi, Dong-Hyun Kim
    International Journal of Environmental Research an.2015; 12(5): 5129.     CrossRef
  • The awareness of "School Environmental Sanitation and Cleanup Zone System" and harmful perception by shops among students, teachers and parents in Korea
    Aeree Sohn
    Korean Journal of Health Education and Promotion.2015; 32(5): 83.     CrossRef
  • Substance Use and Sexual Behaviors of Adolescents in Multicultural Families in Korea
    Subin Park
    Psychiatry Investigation.2015; 12(4): 466.     CrossRef
  • Health-related quality of life assessment according to socio-demographic characteristics and health behavior among Gyeonggi-do citizens: focused on gender difference
    Sun-Hee Joung, YeogSeon Hong, AeRee Sohn
    Korean Journal of Health Education and Promotion.2015; 32(3): 33.     CrossRef
  • A Period of Storm and Stress
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2014; 5(3): 117.     CrossRef
  • Characterizing Patterns of Experience of Harmful Shops among Adolescents Using Decision Tree Models
    Aeree Sohn
    Korean Journal of Health Education and Promotion.2014; 31(3): 15.     CrossRef
Articleses
Improving Service Quality in Long-term Care Hospitals: National Evaluation on Long-term Care Hospitals and Employees Perception of Quality Dimensions
Jinkyung Kim, Woosok Han
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2012;3(2):94-99.   Published online June 30, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2012.04.005
  • 1,851 View
  • 15 Download
  • 9 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
To investigate predictors for specific dimensions of service quality perceived by hospital employees in long-term care hospitals.
Methods
Data collected from a survey of 298 hospital employees in 18 long-term care hospitals were analysed. Multivariate ordinary least squares regression analysis with hospital fixed effects was used to determine the predictors of service quality using respondents’ and organizational characteristics.
Results
The most significant predictors of employee-perceived service quality were job satisfaction and degree of consent on national evaluation criteria. National evaluation results on long-term care hospitals and work environment also had positive effects on service quality.
Conclusion
The findings of the study show that organizational characteristics are significant determinants of service quality in long-term care hospitals. Assessment of the extent to which hospitals address factors related to employeeperceived quality of services could be the first step in quality improvement activities. Results have implications for efforts to improve service quality in longterm care hospitals and designing more comprehensive national evaluation criteria.

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A diversity of Antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus spp. in a Public Transportation System
Pamela J. Yeh, Dawn M. Simon, Jess A. Millar, H. Forrest Alexander, Darleen Franklin
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2011;2(3):202-209.   Published online December 31, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2011.11.047
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Our goal was to determine the diversity and abundance of Staphylococcus bacteria on different components of a public transportation system in a mid-sized US city (Portland, Oregon) and to examine the level of drug resistance in these bacteria.
Methods
We collected 70 samples from 2 cm × 4 cm sections from seven different areas on buses and trains in Portland, USA, taking 10 samples from each area. We isolated a subset of 14 suspected Staphylococcus spp. colonies based on phenotype, and constructed a phylogeny from16S rRNA sequences to assist in identification. We used the Kirbye–Bauer disk diffusion method to determine resistance levels to six common antibiotics.
Results
We found a range of pathogenic Staphylococcus species. The mean bacterial colony counts were 97.1 on bus and train floors, 80.1 in cloth seats, 9.5 on handrails, 8.6 on seats and armrests at bus stops, 3.8 on the underside of seats, 2.2 on windows, and 1.8 on vinyl seats per 8 cm2 sample area. These differences were significant (p < 0.001). Of the 14 isolates sequenced, 11 were staphylococci, and of these, five were resistant to penicillin and ampicillin, while only two displayed intermediate resistance to bacitracin. All 11 isolates were sensitive to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, vancomycin, and tetracycline.
Conclusions
We found six different strains of Staphylococcus, and while there were varying levels of drug resistance, we did not find extensive levels of multidrug-resistant bacteria, and no S. aureus was found. We found floors and cloth seats to be areas on buses and trains that showed particularly high levels of bacteria.

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PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives