Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
5 "stress"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Original Articles
The Effects of Laughter Therapy for the Relief of Employment-Stress in Korean Student Nurses by Assessing Psychological Stress Salivary Cortisol and Subjective Happiness
Ji-Soo Lee, Soo-Kyoung Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2020;11(1):44-52.   Published online February 28, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2020.11.1.07
  • 4,984 View
  • 129 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Korean student nurses may be exposed to stress caused by their future employment (employment stress). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a Laughter Program on psychological stress, by assessing salivary cortisol and the subjective happiness of student nurses in order to relieve employment stress.

Methods

A quasi-experimental, non-equivalent, control-group, and pre-test/post-test was conducted in 4th year student nurses (n = 48) from 2 universities in Korea at a time when participants’ final exams and job searches were simultaneously occurring. Physiological stress (salivary cortisol), and psychological stress measured using modified Cornell Medical Index questionnaire and the Subjective Happiness Scale were used to determine the effects of the program.

Results

The results of the study showed that the Laughter Program was effective in relieving employment stress and increasing the subjective well-being of student nurses. Psychological stress (p < 0.001), salivary cortisol levels (p < 0.001), and subjective happiness (p < 0.001) were statistically significantly improved after the intervention compared with before the Laughter Program.

Conclusion

This study is an effective evidence-based intervention to reduce student nurses employment stress and improve subjective happiness.

Perceived Psychological Traumatic Childbirth in Iranian Mothers: Diagnostic Value of Coping Strategies
Sedigheh Abdollahpour, Seyed Abbas Mousavi, Habibollah Esmaily, Ahmad Khosrav
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2019;10(2):72-77.   Published online April 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2019.10.2.05
  • 19,927 View
  • 37 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic value of a stress coping scale for predicting perceived psychological traumatic childbirth in mothers.

Methods

This cross-sectional study was performed on 400 new mothers (within 48 hours of childbirth). Psychological traumatic childbirth was evaluated using the 4 diagnostic criteria of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Coping was measured using Moss and Billings’ Stress Coping Strategies Scale.

Results

The overall mean score of stress coping was 29 ± 14.2. There were 193 (43.8%) mothers that had experienced a psychological traumatic childbirth. A stress coping score ≤ 30, with a sensitivity of 90.16 (95% CI = 85.1–94.0), and a specificity of 87.44 (95% CI = 82.1–91.6), was determined as a predictor of psychological traumatic childbirth. So that among mothers with stress coping scores ≤ 30, 87% had experienced a psychological traumatic childbirth.

Conclusion

Investigating the degree of coping with stress can be used as an accurate diagnostic tool for psychological traumatic childbirth. It is recommended that during pregnancy, problem-solving and stress management training programs be used as psychological interventions for mothers with low levels of stress control. This will ensure that they can better cope with traumatic childbirth and post-traumatic stress in the postpartum stage.

How do Sexual Identity, and Coming Out Affect Stress, Depression, and Suicidal Ideation and Attempts Among Men Who Have Sex With Men in South Korea?
Byonghee Cho, Aeree Sohn
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2016;7(5):281-288.   Published online October 31, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2016.09.001
  • 1,908 View
  • 24 Download
  • 9 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study investigated the status of sexual identity, perceived stigma, stress, depression, and suicidal ideation and attempts. It also examined how sexual identity and “coming out” affect stress, depression, and suicidal ideation and attempts.
Methods
Suicidal ideation, psychological health status, and health-related behaviors were assessed using the Internet to maximize the confidentiality of the participants, men who have sex with men (MSM). The data were collected from a total of 873 MSM aged between 19 years and 59 years in 2014.
Results
Only 20.9% of the MSM had come out (18.0% voluntarily and 2.9% by others). The prevalences of perceived stress and depression among MSM were 46.7% and 42.7%, respectively, compared with 20.1% and 7.4% among general men. Approximately 32% of the MSM reported any suicidal ideation, and 3.3% had attempted suicide in the past year. The likelihood of suicidal ideation was significantly associated with being age 30–39 years [odds ratio (OR) = 1.8], high school or less (OR = 1.6), having been outed (OR = 5.2), feeling stressed (OR = 1.8), and feeling depressed (OR = 12.4) after sociodemographic factors and other perceptions were controlled for.
Conclusion
The present study provides evidence that MSM are at an elevated risk for suicidal ideation and attempts with high stress and depression. Some risk factors were specific to being gay or bisexual in a hostile environment.
Exposure–Response Relationship Between Aircraft Noise and Sleep Quality: A Community-based Cross-sectional Study
Soo Jeong Kim, Sang Kug Chai, Keou Won Lee, Jae-Beom Park, Kyoung-Bok Min, Hyun Gwon Kil, Chan Lee, Kyung Jong Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(2):108-114.   Published online April 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.03.004
  • 2,015 View
  • 25 Download
  • 17 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Exposure to aircraft noise has been shown to have adverse health effects, causing annoyance and affecting the health-related quality of life, sleep, and mental states of those exposed to it. This study aimed to determine sleep quality in participants residing near an airfield and to evaluate the relationship between the levels of aircraft noise and sleep quality.
Methods
Neighboring regions of a military airfield were divided into three groups: a high exposure group, a low exposure group, and a control group. A total of 1082 participants (aged 30–79 years) completed a comprehensive self-administered questionnaire requesting information about demographics, medical history, lifestyle, and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index.
Results
Of the 1082 participants, 1005 qualified for this study. The prevalence of sleep disturbance was 45.5% in the control group, 71.8% in the low exposure group, and 77.1% in the high exposure group (p for trend < 0.001). After adjusting for potential confounding factors, we determined the exposure–response relationship between the degree of aircraft noise and sleep quality. Of the participants with a normal mental status, the prevalence of sleep disturbance was 2.61-fold higher in the low exposure group and 3.52-fold higher in the high exposure group than in the control group.
Conclusion
The relationship between aircraft noise and health should be further evaluated through a large-scale follow-up study.
Articles
Proteomic Analysis of Cellular and Membrane Proteins in Fluconazole-Resistant Candida glabrata
Jae Il Yoo, Chi Won Choi, Hwa Su Kim, Jung Sik Yoo, Young Hee Jeong, Yeong Seon Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2012;3(2):74-78.   Published online June 30, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2012.04.001
  • 1,661 View
  • 14 Download
  • 6 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Candida glabrata is one of the most common causes of Candida bloodstream infections worldwide. Some isolates of C glabrata may be intermediately resistant to azoles, with some strains developing resistance during therapy or prophylaxis with fluconazole. In this study, we used a proteomic approach to identify differentially expressed proteins between fluconazoleresistant and -susceptible strains.
Methods
Membrane and cellular proteins were extracted from fluconazolesusceptible and fluconazole-resistant C glabrata strains. Differentially expressed proteins were compared using two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Proteins with >1.5-fold difference in expression were identified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS).
Results
A total of 65 proteins were differentially expressed in the cellular and membrane fractions. Among the 39 cellular proteins, 11 were upregulated and 28 were downregulated in fluconazole-resistant strains in comparison with fluconazole-susceptible strains. In the membrane fraction, a total of 26 proteins were found, of which 19 were upregulated and seven were downregulated. A total of 31 proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS that are involved in glycolysis, carbohydrate transport, energy transfer, and other metabolic pathways. Heat shock proteins were identified in various spots.
Conclusion
Heat shock and stress response proteins were upregulated in the membrane fraction of the fluconazole-resistant C glabrata strain. Compared with susceptible strains, fluconazole-resistant strains showed increased expression of membrane proteins and decreased expression of cellular proteins.

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives