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Original Article
Prevalence and patterns of post-COVID-19 symptoms in recovered patients of Delhi, India: a population-based study
Nidhi Bhatnagar, Mongjam Meghachandra Singh, Hitakshi Sharma, Suruchi Mishra, Gurmeet Singh, Shivani Rao, Amod Borle, Tanu Anand, Naresh Kumar, Binita Goswami, Sarika Singh, Mahima Kapoor, Sumeet Singla, Bembem Khuraijam, Nita Khurana, Urvi Sharma, Suneela Garg
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2024;15(3):229-237.   Published online May 17, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2023.0251
  • 651 View
  • 26 Download
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Post-coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) symptoms were widely reported. However, data on post-COVID-19 conditions following infection with the Omicron variant remained scarce. This prospective study was conducted to understand the prevalence, patterns, and duration of symptoms in patients who had recovered from COVID-19. Methods: A prospective study was conducted across 11 districts of Delhi, India, among individuals who had recovered from COVID-19. Study participants were enrolled, and then returned for post-recovery follow-up at 3 months and 6 months interval. Results: The mean age of study participants was 42.07 years, with a standard deviation of 14.89 years. The majority of the participants (79.7%) reported experiencing post-COVID-19 symptoms. The most common symptoms included joint pain (36.0%), persistent dry cough (35.7%), anxiety (28.4%), and shortness of breath (27.1%). Other symptoms were persistent fatigue (21.6%), persistent headache (20.0%), forgetfulness (19.7%), and limb weakness (18.6%). The longest duration of symptom was observed to be anxiety (138.75±54.14 days), followed by fatigue (137.57±48.33 days), shortness of breath (131.89±60.21 days), and joint pain/swelling (131.59±58.76 days). At the first follow-up visit, 2.2% of participants presented with abnormal electrocardiogram readings, but no abnormalities were noticed during the second follow-up. Additionally, 4.06% of participants exhibited abnormal chest X-ray findings at the first followup, which decreased to 2.16% by the second visit. Conclusion: The most frequently reported post-COVID-19 symptoms were joint pain, dry cough, anxiety and shortness of breath. These clinical symptoms persisted for up to 6 months, with evidence of multi-system involvement. Consequently, findings highlighted the need for long-term follow-up during the post-COVID-19 period.
Short Communication
COVID-19 outbreak and risk factors for infection in a taekwondo gym in the Republic of Korea
Seung Hwan Shin, Eonjoo Park, Sookhyun Kim, Minji Jang, Subin Park, Dong-Hwi Kim, Tae Jong Son, Ji-Hyuk Park
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2022;13(2):162-170.   Published online March 31, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0295
  • 4,767 View
  • 119 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Relatively few studies have assessed risk factors for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in public facilities used by children and adolescents. This study presents an analysis of a COVID-19 outbreak that occurred in a taekwondo gym in Korea, predominantly among children and adolescents, with the aim of providing insights on managing COVID-19 outbreaks in similar facilities. Methods: All 108 taekwondo gym students and staff received COVID-19 tests. A survey and closed-circuit television analyses were used to identify risk factors. A univariate analysis was conducted, followed by multivariate logistic regression analysis with backward elimination for variables with a significance level <0.10 in the univariate analysis. Results: COVID-19 was confirmed in 30 of 108 subjects at the taekwondo gym (attack rate, 27.8%). The outbreak started in an adult class student. This student transmitted the virus to the staff, who consequently transmitted the virus to adolescent students. In the univariate analysis, the relative risk for younger age (≤9 years) was 2.14 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01–4.54; p=0.054), and that for food consumption inside the gym was 2.12 (95% CI, 1.04–4.30; p=0.048). In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, the odds ratio for younger age was 2.96 (95% CI, 1.07–8.20; p=0.036), and that for food consumption inside the gym was 3.00 (95% CI, 1.10–8.17; p=0.032). Conclusion: Food consumption inside the facility and young age were significant risk factors for COVID-19 transmission in this taekwondo gym. Food consumption should be prohibited in sports facilities, and infection prevention education for young students is also required.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The First Outbreak of Novel Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) at an Outdoor Camping Site in South Korea, 2020
    Na-Young Kim, Seonhee Ahn, GwangJin Kim, Donghyok Kwon, Young-Joon Park, Sang-Eun Lee
    Journal of Epidemiology.2024; 34(4): 203.     CrossRef
  • Risk evaluation of venue types and human behaviors of COVID-19 outbreaks in public indoor environments: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Weiwei Huang, Caroline X. Gao, Danting Luo, Yong Wang, Xiaohong Zheng, Cong Liu, Ying Wang, Yuguo Li, Hua Qian
    Environmental Pollution.2024; 341: 122970.     CrossRef
  • Investigating Factors Contributing to the Occurrence of COVID-19 Outbreaks in Athletes in a Scoping Review
    Shuichi KASAMA, Haruyo SAKAKI, Eiko ENDO
    Taiikugaku kenkyu (Japan Journal of Physical Educa.2024; 69: 151.     CrossRef
  • The Risk of SARS-CoV-2 Transmission in Community Indoor Settings: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
    Mark Rohit Francis, Saheed Gidado, J Pekka Nuorti
    The Journal of Infectious Diseases.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • SARS-CoV-2 transmission modes: Why and how contamination occurs around shared meals and drinks?
    Aure Saulnier, Jean-Michel Wendling, Benoit Hermant, Didier Lepelletier
    Food Microbiology.2023; 114: 104297.     CrossRef
  • Risk factors for COVID-19 outbreaks in livestock slaughtering and processing facilities in Republic of Korea
    Seongju Choi, Tae Jong Son, Yeon-Kyung Lee
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2023; 14(3): 207.     CrossRef
  • Protective facemask-induced facial thermal stress and breathing burden during exercise in gyms
    Qilong Zhong, Jiyun Song, Dachuan Shi, Chung-Hin Dung
    Building and Environment.2023; 244: 110840.     CrossRef
Review Article
The role of lipids in the pathophysiology of coronavirus infections
Milad Zandi, Parastoo Hosseini, Saber Soltani, Azadeh Rasooli, Mona Moghadami, Sepideh Nasimzadeh, Farzane Behnezhad
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(5):278-285.   Published online October 15, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0153
  • 5,966 View
  • 173 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Coronaviruses, which have been known to cause diseases in animals since the 1930s, utilize cellular components during their replication cycle. Lipids play important roles in viral infection, as coronaviruses target cellular lipids and lipid metabolism to modify their host cells to become an optimal environment for viral replication. Therefore, lipids can be considered as potential targets for the development of antiviral agents. This review provides an overview of the roles of cellular lipids in different stages of the life cycle of coronaviruses.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • PEDV inhibits HNRNPA3 expression by miR-218-5p to enhance cellular lipid accumulation and promote viral replication
    Xiaojie Shi, Qi Zhang, Naling Yang, Quanqiong Wang, Yanxia Zhang, Xingang Xu, Xiang-Jin Meng, Ying Fang
    mBio.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Understanding the Molecular Actions of Spike Glycoprotein in SARS-CoV-2 and Issues of a Novel Therapeutic Strategy for the COVID-19 Vaccine
    Yasunari Matsuzaka, Ryu Yashiro
    BioMedInformatics.2024; 4(2): 1531.     CrossRef
  • Orsay Virus Infection of Caenorhabditis elegans Is Modulated by Zinc and Dependent on Lipids
    Luis Alberto Casorla-Perez, Ranya Guennoun, Ciro Cubillas, Bo Peng, Kerry Kornfeld, David Wang, Rebecca Ellis Dutch
    Journal of Virology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives