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Analysis of risk factors affecting suicidal ideation in South Korea by life cycle stage
Ji-Young Hwang, Il-Su Park
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(5):314-323.   Published online October 26, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0208
  • 2,784 View
  • 101 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study analyzed risk factors for suicidal ideation in South Koreans from a life cycle perspective.
Methods
A secondary analysis was conducted of data collected in 2015 as part of the 6th Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES). The participants comprised 5,935 individuals aged 12 years or older. The statistical analysis reflected the complex sampling design of the KNHANES, and the Rao-Scott chi-square test and multiple logistic regression analysis were performed.
Results
The prevalence of suicidal ideation was 5.7% in adolescents, 3.7% in young adults, 5.4% in middle-aged adults, and 7.0% in older adults. Depression and stress were risk factors in every stage of the life cycle. In those aged 12 to 19 years, activity restrictions were significantly associated with suicidal ideation. Education and subjective health status were risk factors in adults aged 20 to 39 years, and education, activity restrictions, and quality of life were the major risk factors in those aged 40 to 64 years. For adults 65 years of age or older, the risk of suicidal ideation was higher among those with inappropriate sleep time.
Conclusion
The risk factors for suicidal ideation were found to be different across stages of the life cycle. This suggests a need for individualized suicide prevention plans and specific government policies that reflect the characteristics of each life cycle stage.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Association between Sleep Duration and Symptoms of Depression Aged between 18 and 49: The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES Ⅶ) from 2016 to 2018
    Sung-Yong Choi, Ji-Eun Han, Jiae Choi, Minjung Park, Soo-Hyun Sung, Angela Dong-Min Sung
    Healthcare.2022; 10(11): 2324.     CrossRef
Risk Factors in Early Life for Preschool Children in Korea that are Associated with Being Overweight or Obese
Jin Suk Ra, Hyun Jung Yun
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2020;11(1):15-26.   Published online February 28, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2020.11.1.04
  • 4,580 View
  • 125 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The present study addressed the risk factors in early life for Korean preschool children that are associated with being overweight or obese.

Methods

A descriptive cross-sectional design was used to conduct this study, which included 507 mothers with preschool children aged 3–5 years, who attended daycare centers. Data were acquired via a self-administered questionnaire completed by the mothers. Of the 650 questionnaires that were distributed, 507 (78%) were completed and sent back. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to identify risk factors in early life, which may contribute to being overweight or obese in preschool children.

Results

Fifty-eight (11.4%) preschool children were overweight and 41 (8.1%) were obese. Multivariate logistic regression analysis with adjustment for covariates, revealed a significant association with the introduction of solid foods before 4 months of age [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 9.49, p = 0.029] and a nonresponsive feeding style (aOR = 2.80, p = 0.043) with being overweight or obese in preschool children.

Conclusion

The findings of this study highlighted the need for parenting education programs on feeding practices to increase their understanding of hunger and satiety cues in infants, and appropriate timing for the introduction of solid foods.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Systematic review and meta‐analysis of breastfeeding and later overweight or obesity expands on previous study for World Health Organization
    Bernardo Lessa Horta, Nigel Rollins, Mariane S. Dias, Valquiria Garcez, Rafael Pérez‐Escamilla
    Acta Paediatrica.2023; 112(1): 34.     CrossRef
Enteroparasitism and Risk Factors Associated with Clinical Manifestations in Children and Adults of Jalisco State in Western Mexico
María de la Luz Galván-Ramírez, Ana Luisa Madriz-Elisondo, Cynthia Guadalupe Temores Ramírez, Jorge de Jesús Romero Rameño, Dania Araceli de la O Carrasco, Marco Antonio Cardona López
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2019;10(1):39-48.   Published online February 28, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2019.10.1.08
  • 6,217 View
  • 112 Download
  • 10 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

To determine the prevalence and risk factors associated with intestinal parasites in the population of San Juan Cosala, Jalisco, Mexico.

Methods

A total of 277 samples from 104 participants were analysed using direct smear, flotation, formaldehyde/ethyl acetate, and modified Kinyoun’s acid-fast stain methods. The Graham method was applied only for samples from children under 12 years of age for the diagnosis of Enterobius vermicularis.

Results

The prevalence of parasite infections in the study population was 77.9% including: Entamoeba histolytica/E. dispar/E. moshkovskii/E. bangladeshi (37.5%), Giardia intestinalis (11.5%); commensals: Endolimax nana (44.2%), Entamoeba coli (27.9%), Chilomastix mesnili (6.7%) and Iodamoeba bütschlii, (2.9%); emerging intestinal protozoans: Blastocystis spp. (49%), Cryptosporidium spp. (7.7%) and Cyclospora cayetanensis (2.9%); and helminths: Enterobius vermicularis (18.3%) and Ascaris lumbricoides (5.8%). The results also showed that 58.64% of the studied population presented polyparasitism. A significant association was found between protozoan infections and housewives, and houses that were not built with concrete ceilings, brick walls and cement floors (p < 0.05).

Conclusion

Polyparasitism was observed in over half the study population. The most prevalent parasite was Blastocystis spp, whilst the prevalence of helminths was less than that of protozoans. The risk factors for infection to intestinal parasites were being a housewife and not having solid brick, cement and concrete materials for house construction.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Intestinal parasite infections associated with sociodemographic and seasonal factors in the Western Amazon
    Gustavo Henrique Sinhorin, Ana Carolina Gomes Carneiro, Beatrice Emeli Silva Farias, Patrícia de Almeida, Antônio Ralph Medeiros-Sousa, Leonardo Augusto Kohara Melchior, Andreia Fernandes Brilhante
    Parasitology Research.2023; 122(2): 419.     CrossRef
  • Enterobiasis among Yemeni children: a cross-sectional study
    Abdulelah H. Al-Adhroey, Yahya A. Al-Ansi, Mohammed A. Al-Kholani, Abdulrahman H. Amer, Marwan M. Al-Khyat, Fadia H. Al Hubaishi, Radhwan H. Aziz, Ebrahim S. Al-Khateeb, Souad A. Al-Gabri, Tawfik M. Al-Gabri
    Journal of Parasitic Diseases.2022; 46(3): 722.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of human cryptosporidiosis in the Americas: systematic review and meta-analysis
    Higor Wilson Jann, Mauro Jorge Cabral-Castro, João Victor Barreto Costa, Alba Cristina Miranda de Barros Alencar, José Mauro Peralta, Regina Helena Saramago Peralta
    Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de São P.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Intestinal protozoa and helminths in ulcerative colitis and the influence of anti-parasitic therapy on the course of the disease
    Abdurakhim Toychiev, Behzod Navruzov, Dinora Pazylova, Nikolay Davis, Najiya Badalova, Svetlana Osipova
    Acta Tropica.2021; 213: 105755.     CrossRef
  • Contamination of fresh produce sold on the Italian market with Cyclospora cayetanensis and Echinococcus multilocularis
    Alessandra Barlaam, Tamirat T. Temesgen, Kristoffer R. Tysnes, Laura Rinaldi, Nicola Ferrari, Anna R. Sannella, Giovanni Normanno, Simone M. Cacciò, Lucy J. Robertson, Annunziata Giangaspero
    Food Microbiology.2021; 98: 103792.     CrossRef
  • The role of environmental factors in the realization of the epidemic process on ascariasis
    Anton A. Martsev
    Hygiene and sanitation.2021; 100(3): 218.     CrossRef
  • Epidemiology of Intestinal Parasites in Pediatric Patients: Example of Ordu Province
    Emine YURDAKUL ERTÜRK, Ülkü KARAMAN, Yeliz KAŞKO ARICI, Cemil ÇOLAK, Gamze YOLALAN, Şermin TOP
    Online Türk Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Molecular genotyping of Blastocystis spp. in wild mammals from Mexico
    Fernando Martinez-Hernandez, Jose Alejandro Martinez-Ibarra, Eduardo Lopez-Escamilla, Claudia Villanueva-Garcia, Claudia Irais Muñoz-Garcia, Emilio Rendon-Franco, Pablo Maravilla, Guiehdani Villalobos
    Parasitology Research.2020; 119(1): 97.     CrossRef
  • The association between the lack of safe drinking water and sanitation facilities with intestinal Entamoeba spp infection risk: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Hamid Atabati, Hamid Kassiri, Ehsan Shamloo, Mitra Akbari, Ali Atamaleki, Fatemeh Sahlabadi, Nguyen Thi Thuy Linh, Ali Rostami, Yadolah Fakhri, Amin Mousavi Khaneghah, Chia Kwung Fan
    PLOS ONE.2020; 15(11): e0237102.     CrossRef
  • Cyclospora cayetanensis and Cyclosporiasis: An Update
    Sonia Almeria, Hediye N. Cinar, Jitender P. Dubey
    Microorganisms.2019; 7(9): 317.     CrossRef
Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Obesity Levels in Korean Adults: Results from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2007–2015
Kwanjun Park, Sunmi Lim, Yoonhyung Park, Woong Ju, Yoonhee Shin, Hansol Yeom
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2018;9(4):150-159.   Published online August 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2018.9.4.03
  • 3,958 View
  • 32 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The increase in the obesity rate in adult males in Korea is higher than countries in the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development and other Asian countries. We examined the trends and prevalence of major risk factors for cardiovascular disease by evaluating the weight status amongst adults from 2007 to 2015.

Methods

The study included 37,402 adults, who participated in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The prevalence trends of cardiovascular disease risk factors were estimated for each body mass index group.

Results

From 2007 to 2015, significant increases in the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, and hypercholesterolemia were observed in normal weight adults (0.03 percentage point (%p), 0.06%p, and 0.13%p, respectively). Amongst the overweight and obese adults, a significant increase in the prevalence of hypercholesterolemia was observed, During this period, the prevalence of smoking decreased amongst obese adults and no significant changes in drinking habits and physical activity were noted across all body mass index groups.

Conclusion

The prevalence of obesity in Korean adults is increasing, and it is necessary to implement interventions to prevent further weight gain and obesity-associated cardiovascular disease.

Citations

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  • Prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in middle-aged Lithuanian women in different body mass index and waist circumference groups
    Egidija Rinkūnienė, Emilija Petrulionytė, Vilma Dženkevičiūtė, Žaneta Petrulionienė, Augustė Senulytė, Roma Puronaitė, Aleksandras Laucevičius
    Primary Care Diabetes.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Thirty-six Year Trends in Mortality from Diseases of Circulatory System in Korea
    Jongmin Baek, Hokyou Lee, Hyeok-Hee Lee, Ji Eun Heo, So Mi Jemma Cho, Hyeon Chang Kim
    Korean Circulation Journal.2021; 51(4): 320.     CrossRef
  • The identification of established modifiable mid-life risk factors for cardiovascular disease which contribute to cognitive decline: Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging (KLoSA)
    Yebeen Ysabelle Boo, Otto-Emil Jutila, Meghan A. Cupp, Logan Manikam, Sung-Il Cho
    Aging Clinical and Experimental Research.2021; 33(9): 2573.     CrossRef
  • A Healthy Diet Rich in Calcium and Vitamin C Is Inversely Associated with Metabolic Syndrome Risk in Korean Adults from the KNHANES 2013–2017
    Sunmin Park, Kyungjin Kim, Byung-Kook Lee, Jaeouk Ahn
    Nutrients.2021; 13(4): 1312.     CrossRef
  • Classification and Prediction on the Effects of Nutritional Intake on Overweight/Obesity, Dyslipidemia, Hypertension and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Using Deep Learning Model: 4–7th Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
    Hyerim Kim, Dong Hoon Lim, Yoona Kim
    International Journal of Environmental Research an.2021; 18(11): 5597.     CrossRef
  • Trends in cardiovascular disease risk factors by BMI category among adults in England, 2003‐2018
    Shaun Scholes, Linda Ng Fat, Jennifer S. Mindell
    Obesity.2021; 29(8): 1347.     CrossRef
  • Precision Medicine and Cardiovascular Health: Insights from Mendelian Randomization Analyses
    Wes Spiller, Keum Ji Jung, Ji-Young Lee, Sun Ha Jee
    Korean Circulation Journal.2020; 50(2): 91.     CrossRef
  • Association of the Healthy Eating Index with Estimated Cardiovascular Age in Adults from the KNHANES 2013–2017
    Sunmin Park, Kyungjin Kim, Byung-Kook Lee, Jaeouk Ahn
    Nutrients.2020; 12(10): 2912.     CrossRef
Age-differentiated Risk Factors of Suicidal Ideation among Young and Middle-aged Korean Adults
Ahra Jo, Minho Jeon, Heeyoung Oh
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2017;8(3):201-210.   Published online June 30, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2017.8.3.07
  • 2,930 View
  • 29 Download
  • 14 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study aimed to determine the prevalence of suicidal ideation among young and middle-aged adults, and explore the risk factors that affect suicidal ideation.

Methods

A descriptive study design was used for secondary data analysis. A total sample of 5,214 was drawn from two waves (2012–2013) of the 7th Korea Health Panel (KHP) survey. The KHP data were collected by a well-trained interviewer using the face-to-face method during home visits as well as self-report method. Descriptive statistics of frequency, percentage, chi-square test, and logistic regression analysis were performed using SPSS 22.0.

Results

The prevalence of suicidal ideation in young and middle-aged adults was 4.4% and 5.6%, respectively. For young adults, suicidal ideation risk was higher among those with low income or heavy drinking habits. In middle-aged adults, low income, poor perceived health status, negative perception of peer-compared health status, and negative social perspective were the major risk factors.

Conclusion

There is considerable risk of suicidal ideation in adulthood. Opportunities for increased income, avoidance of heavy drinking, and the construction of positive subjective health status and social perspective should be considered in suicide prevention interventions for Korean young and middle-aged adults.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Spectrum and predictors of suicidal risk among incarcerated youth in a correctional facility in Kaduna, Northern Nigeria
    Marufah Dupe Lasisi, Folorunsho Tajudeen Nuhu, Femi Adebayo, Edwin Ehi Eseigbe, Taiwo Lateef Sheikh
    Vulnerable Children and Youth Studies.2022; 17(2): 147.     CrossRef
  • Alcohol use and its association with suicide attempt, suicidal thoughts and non-suicidal self-harm in two successive, nationally representative English household samples
    Sarah Ledden, Paul Moran, David Osborn, Alexandra Pitman
    BJPsych Open.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Associations between Suicidal Ideation and Relatives’ Physical and Mental Health among Community Residents: Differences between Family Members and Lineal Consanguinity
    Caifeng Li, Zhen Wei, Yifan Wang, Long Sun
    International Journal of Environmental Research an.2022; 19(23): 15997.     CrossRef
  • Factors affecting suicidal ideation among premenopausal and postmenopausal women
    Go‐Un Kim, Hae Kyoung Son, Mi‐Young Kim
    Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing.2021; 28(3): 356.     CrossRef
  • Depression and suicidal ideation among HIV seropositive patients attending the special treatment clinic of the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria
    Elvis Mbu Bisong, Chidi John Okafor, Agam Ebaji Ayuk, Udeme Essien Asibong, Henry Ohem Okpa
    Calabar Journal of Health Sciences.2021; 4: 64.     CrossRef
  • The role of ageing in the wish to be dead: disentangling age, period and cohort effects in suicide ideation in European population
    M. Cabello, L. A. Rico-Uribe, J. C. Martinez-Ávila, A. Sánchez-Niubò, F. F. Caballero, G. Borges, B. Mellor-Marsá, J. M. Haro, M. Prina, S. Koskinen, J. L. Ayuso-Mateos
    Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association Between Suicide Risk and Comorbidity of Mood Disorder and Alcohol Use Disorder: Using Common Data Model in Psychiatry
    Yong Hyuk Cho, Eunyoung Lee, Eun Sil Her, Gyubeom Hwang, Ki-Young Lim, Jai Sung Noh, Yunmi Shin, Chang Hyung Hong, Hyun Woong Roh, Dongyun Lee, Heirim Lee, Doyeop Kim, Rae Woong Park, Bumhee Park, Sang Joon Son
    Journal of Korean Neuropsychiatric Association.2021; 60(3): 232.     CrossRef
  • Analysis of risk factors affecting suicidal ideation in South Korea by life cycle stage
    Ji-Young Hwang, Il-Su Park
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2021; 12(5): 314.     CrossRef
  • Association of chronic diseases and lifestyle factors with suicidal ideation among adults aged 18–69 years in Eswatini: evidence from a population-based survey
    Mfundi President Sebenele Motsa, Hung-Yi Chiou, Yi-Hua Chen
    BMC Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Cross-national prevalence and factors associated with suicide ideation and attempts in older and young-and-middle age people
    Maria Cabello, Marta Miret, José Luis Ayuso-Mateos, Felix Feliz Caballero, Somnath Chatterji, Beata Tobiasz-Adamczyk, Josep Maria Haro, Seppo Koskinen, Matilde Leonardi, Guilherme Borges
    Aging & Mental Health.2020; 24(9): 1533.     CrossRef
  • Characteristics, causality, and suicidal behavior: a qualitative study of family members with suicide history in Wonogiri, Indonesia
    Susana Nurtanti, Sri Handayani, Nita Yunianti Ratnasari, Putri Halimu Husna, Tantut Susanto
    Frontiers of Nursing.2020; 7(2): 169.     CrossRef
  • Risk Factors for Suicidal Ideation among Middle Class Korean: Focusing on Psychosocial Comparison - An Analysis of a Nationwide Survey of the 8th Korea Health Panel Data
    Ahra Jo, Bora Kang, Youngju Seo, Eunha Gil, Heeyoung Oh
    Journal of Korean Academy of Community Health Nurs.2018; 29(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • The Function of Personality in Suicidal Ideation from the Perspective of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide
    Marc Baertschi, Alessandra Costanza, Alessandra Canuto, Kerstin Weber
    International Journal of Environmental Research an.2018; 15(4): 636.     CrossRef
  • To Be or Not to Be
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2017; 8(3): 157.     CrossRef
Low Levels of Extensively Drug-resistant Tuberculosis among Multidrug Resistant Tuberculosis Isolates and Their Relationship to Risk Factors: Surveillance in Tehran, Iran; 2006 to 2014
Alireza Hadizadeh Tasbiti, Shamsi Yari, Mostafa Ghanei, Mohammad Ali Shokrgozar, Abolfazl Fateh, Ahmadreza Bahrmand
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2017;8(2):116-123.   Published online April 30, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2017.8.2.03
  • 2,709 View
  • 25 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) is more expensive and difficult to treat than multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), and outcomes for patients are much worse; therefore, it is important that clinicians understand the magnitude and distribution of XDR-TB. We conducted a retrospective study to compare the estimated incidence of and risk factors for M/XDR-TB with those of susceptible TB controls.

Methods

Sputum culture and drug susceptibility testing (DST) were performed in patients with known or suspected TB. Strains that were identified as MDR were subjected to DST for second-line drugs using the proportion method.

Results

Among 1,442 TB patients (mean age, 46.48 ± 21.24 years) who were culture-positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, 1,126 (78.1%) yielded isolates that were resistant to at least one first-line drug; there were 33 isolates (2.3%) of MDR-TB, of which three (0.2%) were classified as XDR-TB. Ofloxacin resistance was found in 10 (0.7%) isolates. Women were 15% more likely than men to yield M/XDR-TB isolates, but this difference was not significant. In a multivariate analysis comparing susceptible TB with X/MDR-TB, only one variable—the number of previous treatment regimens—was associated with MDR (odds ratio, 1.06; 95% confidence interval, 1.14–21.2).

Conclusion

The burden of M/XDR-TB cases is not sizeable in Iran. Nonetheless, strategies must be implemented to identify and cure patients with pre-XDR-TB before they develop XDR-TB. Our results provide a greater understanding of the evolution and spread of M/XDR-TB in an environment where drug-resistant TB has a low incidence.

Citations

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  • Mycobacterium tuberculosis PPE7 Enhances Intracellular Survival of Mycobacterium smegmatis and Manipulates Host Cell Cytokine Secretion Through Nuclear Factor Kappa B and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling
    Jing Suo, Xinyan Wang, Rongchuan Zhao, Pengjiao Ma, Liang Ge, Tao Luo
    Journal of Interferon & Cytokine Research.2022; 42(10): 525.     CrossRef
  • The burden of pre-extensively and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis among MDR-TB patients in the Amhara region, Ethiopia
    Agumas Shibabaw, Baye Gelaw, Wondwossen Gebreyes, Richard Robinson, Shu-Hua Wang, Belay Tessema, Shampa Anupurba
    PLOS ONE.2020; 15(2): e0229040.     CrossRef
  • Spoligotype and Drug Susceptibility Profiles of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Isolates in Golestan Province, North Iran


    Noormohamad Mansoori, Farzam Vaziri, Sirus Amini, Sharareh Khanipour, Shahin Pourazar Dizaji, Masoumeh Douraghi
    Infection and Drug Resistance.2020; Volume 13: 2073.     CrossRef
  • A comparative study of phenotypic and genotypic first- and second-line drug resistance testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis
    Fatemeh Sakhaee, Morteza Ghazanfari, Nayereh Ebrahimzadeh, Farzam Vaziri, Fatemeh Rahimi Jamnani, Mehdi Davari, Safoora Gharibzadeh, Fatemeh Hemati Mandjin, Abolfazl Fateh, Seyed Davar Siadat
    Biologicals.2017; 49: 33.     CrossRef
Intake Trends of Red Meat, Alcohol, and Fruits and Vegetables as Cancer-Related Dietary Factors from 1998 to 2009
Min Kyung Park, Hee Young Paik, Yeonsook Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2016;7(3):180-189.   Published online June 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2016.04.005
  • 2,034 View
  • 15 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide, and cancer incidence and mortality have been increasing steadily in South Korea. This study aimed to examine the change in consumption of three cancer-related dietary factors—red meat, alcohol, and fruits/vegetables, and to evaluate consumption of these dietary factors among Koreans according to the criteria from the recommendations of the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute of Cancer Research.
Methods
Consumption of red meat, alcoholic beverages, and fruits and vegetables was calculated from the 24-hour recall data of 36,486 individuals older than 20 years who were selected from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1998–2009. The intake adequacy of these three factors was evaluated by the recommended criteria of the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute of Cancer Research report.
Results
The mean red meat intake in the men in their 20s increased sharply (from 91.6 g to 111.3 g, p < 0.05). The mean alcohol intake increased continuously in men (from 10.3 g to 20.0 g, p < 0.05) and women (from 1.5 g to 3.5 g, p < 0.05). The mean fruit/vegetable intake decreased in the 21–29–year age group (from 349.4 g to 306.7 g in men; from 393.3 g to 292.5 g in women; p < 0.05). The percentage of individuals who did not meet the intake criteria for the three cancer-related dietary factors was especially high, and the percentage increased over 10 years in those in their 20s (p < 0.05).
Conclusion
We confirmed that intakes of red meat, alcoholic drink, and fruits and vegetables have moved toward a negative direction in both men and women in their 20s.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Associations of cooking practices and healthy eating habits among young Korean adults in their 20s
    So-Young Kim, Ji Yu Choi
    International Journal of Gastronomy and Food Scien.2023; 31: 100644.     CrossRef
  • Lifestyle and Sociodemographic and Economic Characteristics of Patients with Lung Cancer in Morocco
    Imane Harkati, Mohamed Kamal Hilali, Nezha Oumghar, Mouna Khouchani, Mohamed Loukid
    Canadian Respiratory Journal.2020; 2020: 1.     CrossRef
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    So-young Kim, EunJu Lee
    British Food Journal.2020; 122(9): 2841.     CrossRef
  • Effects of processed red meat consumption on the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases among Korean adults: the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study
    Jakyung Son, Yujin Lee, Kyong Park
    European Journal of Nutrition.2019; 58(6): 2477.     CrossRef
  • Dietary patterns related to exposure to persistent organic pollutants based on the Ewha Birth and Growth Cohort
    Hye Ah Lee, Hyo Jeong Hwang, Se Young Oh, Eun Hee Ha, Hyesook Park
    Environmental Pollution.2018; 243: 189.     CrossRef
  • Diet-Related Risk Factors for Incident Hypertension During an 11-Year Follow-Up: The Korean Genome Epidemiology Study
    Hye Lee, Hyesook Park
    Nutrients.2018; 10(8): 1077.     CrossRef
  • Dietary Factors and Female Breast Cancer Risk: A Prospective Cohort Study
    Ji Kim, Jeonghee Lee, So-Youn Jung, Jeongseon Kim
    Nutrients.2017; 9(12): 1331.     CrossRef
  • Associations between high-risk alcohol consumption and sarcopenia among postmenopausal women
    Yu-Jin Kwon, Hyoung-Ji Lim, Yong-Jae Lee, Hye-Sun Lee, John A. Linton, Jae Woo Lee, Hee-Taik Kang
    Menopause.2017; 24(9): 1022.     CrossRef
Accuracy of Self-reported Hypertension, Diabetes, and Hypercholesterolemia: Analysis of a Representative Sample of Korean Older Adults
Heeran Chun, Il-Ho Kim, Kyung-Duk Min
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2016;7(2):108-115.   Published online April 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2015.12.002
  • 2,463 View
  • 23 Download
  • 40 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study will assess the accuracy of self-reported hypertension, diabetes, and hypercholesterolemia among Korean older adults.
Methods
Using data from the fourth Korean National Health Examination and Nutrition Survey (KNHANES IV, 2007–2009), we selected 7,270 individuals aged 50 years and older who participated in both a health examination and a health interview survey. Self-reported prevalence of hypertension (HTN), diabetes mellitus (DM), and hypercholesterolemia was compared with measured data (arterial systolic/diastolic blood pressure, fasting glucose, and total cholesterol).
Results
An agreement between self-reported and measured data was only moderate for hypercholesterolemia (κ, 0.48), even though it was high for HTN (κ, 0.72) and DM (κ, 0. 82). Sensitivity was low in hypercholesterolemia (46.7%), but high in HTN and DM (73% and 79.3%, respectively). Multiple analysis shows that predictors for sensitivity differed by disease. People with less education were more likely to exhibit lower sensitivity to HTN and hypercholesterolemia, and people living in rural areas were less sensitive to DM and hypercholesterolemia.
Conclusion
Caution is needed in interpreting the results of community studies using self-reported data on chronic diseases, especially hypercholesterolemia, among adults aged 50 years and older.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Validity of self‐reported hypertension and related factors in the adult population: Preliminary results from the cohort in the west of Iran
    Negar Piri, Yousef Moradi, Reza Ghanei Gheshlagh, Mahsa Abdullahi, Eghbal Fattahi, Farhad Moradpour
    The Journal of Clinical Hypertension.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Vascular risk factors and stroke risk across the life span: A population-representative study of half a million people
    Raed A Joundi, Scott B Patten, Jeanne VA Williams, Eric E Smith
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Composition of Metabolic Syndrome Among Korean Adults in a Lifestyle Modification Intervention
Nan-He Yoon, Seunghyun Yoo, Hyekyeong Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(6):370-377.   Published online December 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.10.005
  • 1,964 View
  • 25 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The aim of this study was to examine the composition of metabolic syndrome (MetS) components among middle-aged and older Koreans.
Methods
A total of 263 participants (age 40 + years) in a lifestyle modification intervention program who met the MetS definition of National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) – Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III criteria were included in the study. The frequent patterns and clustering of MetS components were investigated. Clustering of changes in individual components, through a lifestyle modification intervention, was also identified. All characteristics were stratified by and compared between sexes.
Results
Approximately 80% of the participants had three of five MetS risk factors at baseline. The prevalence of each risk differed by sex. MetS composition patterns that do not include low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol were more noticeable in men because of the low prevalence of low HDL cholesterol. In women, with higher prevalence of low HDL cholesterol, more patterns that include low HDL cholesterol were observed. The most common combination was “elevated blood pressure + abdominal obesity + impaired fasting glucose” in both sexes. Clustering of MetS risks was also found with most of the frequent combinations of MetS components. Through the lifestyle intervention, the greatest change was observed in HDL cholesterol among men and blood pressure among women. Triglycerides and HDL cholesterol were likely to be improved with blood pressure in men and abdominal obesity in women.
Conclusion
Differences in the prevalent patterns of MetS compositions were observed prior to and after the intervention, along with during-intervention changes. It is recommended that intervention strategies and guidelines for MetS management consider the MetS composition patterns for effectiveness.

Citations

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  • Gender Differences of Health Behaviors in the Risk of Metabolic Syndrome for Middle-Aged Adults: A National Cross-Sectional Study in South Korea
    Jaehee Yoon, Jeewuan Kim, Heesook Son
    International Journal of Environmental Research an.2021; 18(7): 3699.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of the physical activity level, nutrition quality, and depression in patients with metabolic syndrome
    İsmet Kazaz, Ender Angin, Seray Kabaran, Gözde İyigün, Berkiye Kirmizigil, Mehtap Malkoç
    Medicine.2018; 97(18): e0485.     CrossRef
  • Effects of prolonged exercise versus multiple short exercise sessions on risk for metabolic syndrome and the atherogenic index in middle-aged obese women: a randomised controlled trial
    JinWook Chung, KwangJun Kim, Jeeyoung Hong, Hyoun-Joong Kong
    BMC Women's Health.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Health related behavior patterns and associated factors among marriage immigrant women using latent class analysis
    Wonsup Cho, Seunghyun Yoo, Hyekyeong Kim
    Korean Journal of Health Education and Promotion.2015; 32(5): 17.     CrossRef
  • Depression among Korean Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Ansan-Community-Based Epidemiological Study
    Chan Young Park, So Young Kim, Jong Won Gil, Min Hee Park, Jong-Hyock Park, Yeonjung Kim
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2015; 6(4): 224.     CrossRef
Evidence Gap on the Prevalence of Non-conventional Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes in Iran
Abdolreza Shaghaghi, Ali Ahmadi
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(5):292-297.   Published online October 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.08.002
  • 1,997 View
  • 17 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Robust scientific evidence exists about the role of non-conventional risk factors in type 2 diabetes worldwide. The current epidemiological pattern of the disease in Iran suggests a precipitating role for these non-conventional risk factors. This review was performed to examine the research evidence suggesting a higher prevalence of non-conventional type 2 diabetes risk factors in Iran.
Methods
MeSH keywords were applied to search several databases, including PUBMED, MEDLINE, AMED, EMBASE, Iran DOC, and the Scientific Information Database without a time limit from inception to September 2011. The quality of the non-interventional and population-based studies on Iranians included in these databases was assessed by the authors and any disagreement was resolved with consensus.
Results
The literature search yielded 1847 publications, of which 62 were included in this study after eliminating non-relevant and overlapping papers. No study was found that verified a higher prevalence of the non-conventional type 2 diabetes risk factors in the Iranian population.
Conclusion
The identified evidence gap about the role of prominent non-conventional risk factors of type 2 diabetes in the Iranian population could be a major caveat in the application of an evidence-based approach to endorse or reject existing hypothesis about these risk factors. Studies on the prevalence of non-conventional biomarkers of type 2 diabetes among Iranians could be a promising area of research.

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  • Application of Pender’s health promotion model for type 2 diabetes treatment adherence: protocol for a mixed methods study in southern Iran
    Nahid Shahabi, Zahra Hosseini, Teamur Aghamolaei, Amin Ghanbarnejad, Ahmad Behzad
    Trials.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and determinants of diabetes and prediabetes in southwestern Iran: the Khuzestan comprehensive health study (KCHS)
    Sanam Hariri, Zahra Rahimi, Nahid Hashemi-Madani, Seyyed Ali Mard, Farnaz Hashemi, Zahra Mohammadi, Leila Danehchin, Farhad Abolnezhadian, Aliasghar Valipour, Yousef Paridar, Mohammad Mahdi Mir-Nasseri, Alireza Khajavi, Sahar Masoudi, Saba Alvand, Bahman
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    Elnaz Daneshzad, Shaghayegh Emami, Manije Darooghegi Mofrad, Sahar Saraf-Bank, Pamela J. Surkan, Leila Azadbakht
    Journal of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Research.2018; 10(3): 153.     CrossRef
Prevalence and Risk Factors of Clonorchiasis among the Populations Served by Primary Healthcare Posts along Five Major Rivers in South Korea
Kyung Ja June, Shin Hyeong Cho, Won Ja Lee, Chunmi Kim, Kyung-Soon Park
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2013;4(1):21-26.   Published online February 28, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2012.12.002
  • 2,012 View
  • 13 Download
  • 15 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Clonorchiasis is an infectious disease caused by the Chinese liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis. In this study, we investigated the prevalence and risk factors of clonorchiasis among the populations served by primary healthcare posts along five major rivers in South Korea.
Methods
Forty primary healthcare posts that are located less than 5 km from one of the five rivers were selected from 26 counties. For the purpose of the survey, community health practitioners selected the nearest villages from the riversides in their own catchment area. From January to May 2009, a total of 2788 stool samples were collected and examined using the formalin–ether sedimentation technique. Village inhabitants were also interviewed by means of questionnaires in order to obtain information on potential risk factors.
Results
The prevalence rates of clonorchiasis at various river basins were as follows: Seomjin River, 21.3%; Nakdong River, 13.5%; Geum River, 9.2%; Han River, 7.6%; and Yeongsan River, 4.9%. The total number of people infected with C. sinensis was 329 (11.3%). By gender, 14.3% of males and 7.6% of females were infected. In case of both males and females, the prevalence rate was highest in those in their 40s. Consumption of raw freshwater fish was confirmed as a risk factor based on a logistic regression analysis.
Conclusion
The present findings suggest that clonorchiasis is still highly prevalent among the inhabitants of riverside areas in southern Korea, and, accordingly, it is necessary to implement a systematic control program in the endemic areas.

Citations

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  • Infection Characteristics of Clonorchis sinensis Metacercariae in Fish from Republic of Korea
    Woon-Mok Sohn
    The Korean Journal of Parasitology.2022; 60(2): 79.     CrossRef
  • Survey of Zoonotic Trematode Metacercariae in Fish from Water Systems of Geum-gang (River) in Republic of Korea
    Woon-Mok Sohn, Byoung-Kuk Na, Shin-Hyeong Cho, Cheon-Hyeon Kim, Min-Ah Hwang, Kyeong-Woo No, Jai-Dong Kim
    The Korean Journal of Parasitology.2021; 59(1): 23.     CrossRef
  • Risk Factors for Clonorchis sinensis Infection in Residents of Binyang, Guangxi: A Cross-Sectional and Logistic Analysis Study
    Meng Xu, Yanyan Jiang, Jianhai Yin, Shengkui Cao, Yujuan Shen, Jianping Cao
    Frontiers in Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • High Endemicity with Clonorchis sinensis Metacercariae in Fish from Yongjeon-cheon (Stream) in Cheongsong-gun, Gyeongsangbuk-do, Korea
    Woon-Mok Sohn, Byoung-Kuk Na, Shin-Hyeong Cho, Hee Il Lee, Myoung-Ro Lee, Jung-Won Ju, Gou Ok Kim
    The Korean Journal of Parasitology.2021; 59(1): 97.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and Infection Intensity of Zoonotic Trematode Metacercariae in Fish from Soyang-cheon (Stream), in Wanju-gun, Jeollabuk-do, Korea
    Woon-Mok Sohn, Byoung-Kuk Na, Shin-Hyeong Cho, Jung-Won Ju, Cheon-Hyeon Kim, Min-Ah Hwang, Kyeong-Woo No, Jong-Ho Park
    The Korean Journal of Parasitology.2021; 59(3): 265.     CrossRef
  • Survey of Zoonotic Trematode Metacercariae in Fish from Irrigation Canal of Togyo-jeosuji (Reservoir) in Cheorwon-gun, Gangwon-do, Republic of Korea
    Woon-Mok Sohn, Byoung-Kuk Na, Shin-Hyeong Cho, Hee Il Lee, Jung-Won Ju, Myoung-Ro Lee, Eun-Joo Lim, Sung Yong Son, Eunmi Ko, Jaeseok Choi
    The Korean Journal of Parasitology.2021; 59(4): 427.     CrossRef
  • Endemicity of Zoonotic Trematode Metacercariae in Fish from Deokcheon-gang (River) in Sancheong-gun, Gyeongsangnam-do, Republic of Korea
    Woon-Mok Sohn, Byoung-Kuk Na, Shin-Hyeong Cho, Hee Il Lee, Jung-Won Ju, Myoung-Ro Lee, Jeong-Gil Park, Jihee Ahn
    The Korean Journal of Parasitology.2021; 59(5): 523.     CrossRef
  • Surveillance of clonorchiasis in China in 2016
    Ting-Jun Zhu, Ying-Dan Chen, Men-Bao Qian, Hui-Hui Zhu, Ji-Lei Huang, Chang-Hai Zhou, Xiao-Nong Zhou
    Acta Tropica.2020; 203: 105320.     CrossRef
  • Risk Factors of Clonorchis sinensis Human Infections in Endemic Areas, Haman-Gun, Republic of Korea: A Case-Control Study
    Sang-Eun Lee, Hee-Eun Shin, Myoung-Ro Lee, Yang-Hee Kim, Shin-Hyeong Cho, Jung-Won Ju
    The Korean Journal of Parasitology.2020; 58(6): 647.     CrossRef
  • Risk mapping of clonorchiasis in the People’s Republic of China: A systematic review and Bayesian geostatistical analysis
    Ying-Si Lai, Xiao-Nong Zhou, Zhi-Heng Pan, Jürg Utzinger, Penelope Vounatsou, Darren J. Gray
    PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.2017; 11(3): e0005239.     CrossRef
  • Epidemiological and Clinical Parameters Features of Patients with Clonorchiasis in the Geum River Basin, Republic of Korea
    Hee-Eun Shin, Myoung-Ro Lee, Jung-Won Ju, Byong-Suk Jeong, Mi-Yeoun Park, Keoung-Sook Lee, Shin-Hyeong Cho
    Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Infectious Disea.2017; 2017: 1.     CrossRef
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    Hoang Quang Vinh, Waraphon Phimpraphai, Sirikachorn Tangkawattana, John F. Smith, Sasithorn Kaewkes, Do Trung Dung, Tran Thanh Duong, Banchob Sripa
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    Chunmi Kim, Kyung Ja June, Shin Hyeong Cho, Kyung Soon Park, Hung Sa Lee, Ji Yeon Park
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  • Prevalence and Risk Factors of Clonorchiasis among Residents of Riverside Areas in Muju-gun, Jeollabuk-do, Korea
    Do-Soon Park, Sung-Jin Na, Shin Hyeong Cho, Kyung Ja June, Young-Chae Cho, Young-Ha Lee
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    Chunmi Kim, Kyung-Ja June, Aeyoung So
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Increased Prevalence of low High-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol (HDL-C) Levels in Korean Adults: Analysis of the Three Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (KNHANES 1998–2005)
Sun-Ja Choi, Sung-Hee Park, Hyun-Young Park
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2011;2(2):94-103.   Published online June 30, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2011.07.006
  • 2,274 View
  • 11 Download
  • 7 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases that has shown a remarkable increase, but little is known about the prevalence of low HDL-C in Korea. This study aimed to evaluate changing trends of low HDL-C prevalence, and indicate other risk factors associated with low HDL-C.
Methods
We selected subjects aged ≥20 years from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) 1998, 2001, and 2005 (n = 7962, 6436, and 6412). The mean level of HDL-C and the prevalence of low HDL-C was calculated, and cardiovascular risk factors associated with low HDL-C, as well as demographic, anthropometric, lifestyle, and nutrition factors, were assessed using the KNHANES 2005 data.
Results
Mean HDL-C levels in men and women between KNHANES 1998 and 2005 decreased significantly, from 48.1 to 42.3 and from 51.6 to 47.1 mg/dL, respectively (both p < 0.001). The decrease was slightly less for women compared with men for the same period, and women had higher HDL-C levels at all periods. Covariate-adjusted OR revealed that body mass index, waist circumference, and non-alcohol drinker in both men and women were associated with low HDL-C levels by KNHANES 2005, as were employed and light physical activity in men and low fat intake in women.
Conclusion
The prevalence of low HDL-C increased significantly from KNHANES 1998 to 2001 and 2005 (p < 0.001) in both men and women. body mass index, waist circumference, and non-alcohol drinker were identified as associated with low HDL-C in Korean adults.

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PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives