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Original Articles
A case-control study of acute hepatitis A in South Korea, 2019
Jung Hee Hyun, Ju Young Yoon, Sang Hyuk Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2022;13(5):352-359.   Published online October 12, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2022.0141
  • 471 View
  • 42 Download
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
We aimed to reconfirm the source of hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection through epidemiological and genotype investigations of individual cases in a 2019 outbreak in South Korea. Methods: We investigated food intake histories, associations with hepatitis A, and genotypes of HAV in 31 patients with hepatitis aged 20 to 49 years registered in the integrated disease and health management system during December 1–7, 2019 (case group) and in 35 sex- and agematched people without a history of HAV vaccination or infection among patients’ families and colleagues (control group). Results: The consumption of salted clams was a significant factor (odds ratio, 4.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.32–14.18) in the risk factor analysis of food intake history. HAV genotypes were analyzed in 24 of 31 patients. Type IA and type IIIA were found in 23 and 1 cases, respectively. Conclusion: Salted clams are considered to have been the source of HAV infection at 49 weeks of the HAV outbreak in 2019; this result was consistent with that of a previous epidemiological investigation conducted by the Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency in September 2019. Therefore, monitoring of the production and distribution of salted clams needs to be continued.
Behavioral therapy and pharmacotherapy for relapse prevention in abstinent smokers: a rapid review and meta-analysis for the Korea Preventive Service Task Force
Naae Lee, Eon Sook Lee, Jae Moon Yun, Cheol Min Lee, Seung-Won Oh, Younglee Choi, Belong Cho
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(4):244-253.   Published online July 6, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0017
  • 3,885 View
  • 84 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of relapse prevention interventions involving behavioral and pharmacological treatment among abstinent smokers.
Methods
This rapid review was conducted using MEDLINE, Cochrane CENTRAL, CINAHL, Embase, KMbase, and KoreaMed to identify studies published until June 20, 2020. The participants were abstinent smokers who quit smoking on their own, due to pregnancy, hospitalization, or by participating in a smoking cessation program. We found a systematic review that fit the objective of this study and included 81 randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Studies that did not present information on smoking cessation status, had no control group, or used reward-based interventions were excluded. Random effect and fixed effect meta-analyses were used to estimate the relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). In subgroup analyses, differences between subgroups were verified based on the participant setting, characteristics, intervention type, and intensity.
Results
Following screening, 44 RCTs were included in the meta-analysis. The review reported no differences in the success rate of relapse prevention between the behavioral interventions. Pharmacotherapy interventions showed higher success rates (RR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.05−1.26; I2=40.71%), depending on prior abstinence duration and the drug type. Conclusions: The results indicated that pharmacotherapy has a significant effect on preventing relapse among abstinent smokers.
Designing and Evaluating Educational Intervention to Improve Preventive Behavior Against Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Endemic Areas in Iran
Musalreza Ghodsi, Mina Maheri, Hamid Joveini, Mohammad Hassan Rakhshani, Ali Mehri
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2019;10(4):253-262.   Published online August 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2019.10.4.09
  • 5,492 View
  • 94 Download
  • 10 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Health education programs are one of the most important strategies for controlling cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in endemic areas such as Neshabur city. This study aimed to develop and evaluate a comprehensive health education program to improve preventive behaviors for CL.

Methods

This was an interventional study conducted on 136 high school students in Neishabur city. Data collection instruments included a demographic questionnaire and a researcher-made questionnaire based on the “Health Belief Model” and “Beliefs, Attitudes, Subjective Norms and Enabling Factors Model” constructs. The control and intervention groups completed the questionnaires before and 2 months after the intervention. The intervention was conducted in 6, 1-hour educational sessions for the intervention group students and 2, 1-hour sessions for school administrators, teachers, and students’ parents.

Results

There was no significant difference between the 2 groups in the pre-intervention phase. However, in the post-intervention phase, there were significant differences between the 2 groups for mean scores of knowledge, perceived susceptibility, perceived severity, perceived benefits, cues to action, self-efficacy, attitude, subjective norms, behavioral intention, enabling factors, and behavior associated with CL.

Conclusion

Health education program based on the “Health Belief Model” and the “Beliefs, Attitudes, Subjective Norms and Enabling Factors Model” model constructs may be a comprehensive and effective educational program to improve preventive behaviors against CL in students.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Investigating Iranians’ Attitude, Practice, and Perceived Self-Efficacy towards COVID-19 Preventive Behaviors
    Hamid Joveini, Zahra Zare, Masoumeh Hashemian, Ali Mehri, Reza Shahrabadi, Neda Mahdavifar, Hamideh Ebrahimi Aval
    The Open Public Health Journal.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Intervention Study to Increase Knowledge and Awareness in Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Cases: The Case of Şanlıurfa
    Burcu BEYAZGÜL, İbrahim KORUK, Rüstem KUZAN, Şule ALLAHVERDİ
    Mersin Üniversitesi Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi.2022; : 188.     CrossRef
  • Congregational Worshiping and Implementation of the COVID-19 Preventive Behavioral Measures During the Re-opening Phase of Worship Places Among Indonesian Muslims
    Mochamad Iqbal Nurmansyah, Sarah Handayani, Deni Wahyudi Kurniawan, Emma Rachmawati, Hidayati, Ahmad Muttaqin Alim
    Journal of Religion and Health.2022; 61(5): 4169.     CrossRef
  • Development and psychometric assessment of cutaneous leishmaniasis prevention behaviors questionnaire in adolescent female students: Application of integration of cultural model and extended parallel process model
    Masoumeh Alidosti, Hossein Shahnazi, Zahra Heidari, Fereshteh Zamani-Alavijeh, Mona Dür
    PLOS ONE.2022; 17(8): e0273400.     CrossRef
  • Community-Based Interventions for the Prevention and Control of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis: A Systematic Review
    Kay Polidano, Brianne Wenning, Alejandra Ruiz-Cadavid, Baheya Dawaishan, Jay Panchal, Sonali Gunasekara, Haftom Abebe, Marciglei Morais, Helen Price, Lisa Dikomitis
    Social Sciences.2022; 11(10): 490.     CrossRef
  • Knowledge, attitude, and practice toward Zika virus among staff of comprehensive health services centers affiliated with Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2020
    Hamidreza Farrokh‐Eslamlou, Mina Maheri
    Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research.2021; 47(6): 2204.     CrossRef
  • Behaviors and Perceptions Related to Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Endemic Areas of the World: A Review
    Masoumeh Alidosti, Zahra Heidari, Hossein Shahnazi, Fereshteh Zamani-Alavijeh
    Acta Tropica.2021; 223: 106090.     CrossRef
  • Application of BASNEF model in students training regarding cutaneous leishmaniasis prevention behaviors: a school-based quasi experimental study
    Gholamreza Alizadeh, Hossein Shahnazi, Akbar Hassanzadeh
    BMC Infectious Diseases.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Predicting the Preventive Behaviors of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in families with Children Under 10 Years, Applied the Precede Model
    Hosein Jajarmi, Mahdi Gholian-Aval, Asma pourtaheri, Habibollah Esmaily, Hamid Hosseini, Rezvan Rajabzadeh, Hadi Tehrani
    ranian Journal of Health Education and Health Prom.2021; 9(4): 360.     CrossRef
  • Effects of an Educational Intervention on Male Students’ Intention to Quit Water Pipe Smoking: an Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) and Health Action Process Approach (HAPA)
    Hamid Joveini, Tahereh Dehdari, Masoumeh Hashemian, Mina Maheri, Reza Shahrabadi, Alireza Rohban, Ali Mehri, Hasan Eftekhar Ardebili
    Journal of Education and Community Health.2020; 7(2): 73.     CrossRef
Army Soldiers’ Knowledge of, Attitude Towards, and Preventive Behavior Towards Tuberculosis in Korea
Yun Choi, Geum Hee Jeong
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2018;9(5):269-277.   Published online October 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2018.9.5.09
  • 4,994 View
  • 137 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The aim of this study was to gather information about Korean Army soldiers’ attitude towards tuberculosis to enable the development of an informed educational program and potential intervention plans.

Methods

There were 500 male soldiers serving in the Korean Army who responded to questionnaires regarding knowledge of, attitudes towards, and preventive behavior towards tuberculosis. The questionnaires were collected between September 10 until October 1, 2014. Participants’ characteristic that influenced differences in knowledge, attitudes, and preventive behavior towards tuberculosis were compared by t test. Variables that influenced preventive behavior were identified by multiple regression analysis.

Results

The mean scores assessing knowledge of, attitude, and preventive behavior towards tuberculosis were 11.64 (± 4.03) out of 20 points, 3.21 (± 0.38) out of 4 points, and 2.88 (± 0.42) out of 4 points, respectively. Non-smokers were more knowledgeable about tuberculosis than smokers. Participants who had family or friends with tuberculosis had better knowledge and a more productive attitude to tuberculosis. Participants who were educated or obtained information about tuberculosis, received better scores in all areas of knowledge, attitude and preventive behavior compared to other participants. Non-smoking, family or friends who have had tuberculosis, obtaining information about tuberculosis, and positive attitudes towards treatment and preventive education had an explanatory power of 24.6% with regard to preventive behavior against tuberculosis.

Conclusion

More relatable, systemized education should be provided regularly to improve soldiers’ knowledge of, attitudes towards, and prevention against tuberculosis in the Republic of Korea Army.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Knowledge, Attitudes, and Preventative Behavior Toward Tuberculosis in University Students in Indonesia
    Irma Melyani Puspitasari, Rano Kurnia Sinuraya, Arini Nurhaqiqi Aminudin, Rika Rahmi Kamilah
    Infection and Drug Resistance.2022; Volume 15: 4721.     CrossRef
  • Factors Affecting Preventive Behavior related to Tuberculosis among University Students in Korea: Focused on Knowledge, Attitude and Optimistic Bias related to Tuberculosis
    Myung Soon Kwon, Yun Choi
    Journal of Korean Academy of Fundamentals of Nursi.2020; 27(3): 236.     CrossRef
  • Assessment of knowledge, attitude and practice on tuberculosis among teacher trainees of Samtse College of Education, Bhutan
    Thinley Dorji, Tandin Tshering, Kinley Wangdi, Ritesh G. Menezes
    PLOS ONE.2020; 15(11): e0241923.     CrossRef
  • The Infectivity of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Korean Army Units: Evidence from Outbreak Investigations
    Chang-gyo Yoon, Dong Yoon Kang, Jaehun Jung, Soo Yon Oh, Jin Beom Lee, Mi-Hyun Kim, Younsuk Seo, Hee-Jin Kim
    Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases.2019; 82(4): 298.     CrossRef
Factors Affecting Smoking Cessation Success of Heavy Smokers Registered in the Intensive Care Smoking Cessation Camp (Data from the National Tobacco Control Center)
Hansol Yeom, Hee-Sook Lim, Jihyun Min, Seoni Lee, Yoon-Hyung Park
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2018;9(5):240-247.   Published online October 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2018.9.5.05
  • 6,626 View
  • 119 Download
  • 6 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors involved in the success of smoking cessation in heavy smokers enrolled in an intensive care smoking cessation camp program.

Methods

Heavy smokers enrolled in the program were classified into a success (n = 69) or failure (n = 29) group, according to whether they maintained smoking cessation for 6 months after the end of the program. Demographics, smoking behaviors, and smoking cessation-related characteristics were analyzed.

Results

Statistically significantly more participants in the success group had a spouse (98.6%; p = 0.008) compared with participants in the failure group (82.8%). However, multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that having a spouse was not an independent factor in smoking cessation (p = 0.349). A significant difference in the frequency of counseling between the success and failure groups was observed (p = 0.001), with 72.5% of those who received counseling on 3–5 occasions for 6 months after the end of program successfully quit smoking, indicating that those who received more counseling had a higher likelihood of smoking cessation success. This was confirmed as an independent factor by multivariate logistic regression (p < 0.005). Furthermore, a graduate school level of education or higher, indicated a statistically greater success rate compared to those that were less well educated (p = 0.043). This was also observed as a significant independent factor using multivariate logistic regression (p = 0.046).

Conclusion

Education level, marital status, and the number of counseling sessions were significant factors contributing to smoking cessation success.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Sigara Bırakma Polikliniğine Başvuran Bireylerde Tedavi Başarısını Etkileyen Faktörler
    Derya KOCAKAYA, Hatice ŞENOL, Sezer ASLAN, Ahmed Mahmud ÇIRAKOĞLU, Merve ÇAKIR, Hatice TELCİ, Mehmet ÇETİNKAYA, Sehnaz OLGUN, Ayşe Nilüfer ÖZAYDIN, Ceyhan BERRİN
    Bağımlılık Dergisi.2022; 23(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Smoking cessation rates in elderly and nonelderly smokers after participating in an intensive care smoking cessation camp
    Jae-Kyeong Lee, Yu-Il Kim, Sun-Seog Kweon, In-Jae Oh, Yong-Soo Kwon, Hong-Joon Shin, Yu-Ri Choe, Ha-Young Park, Young-Ok Na, Hwa-Kyung Park
    Medicine.2022; 101(30): e29886.     CrossRef
  • Patterns and predictors of smoking relapse among inpatient smoking intervention participants: a 1-year follow-up study in Korea
    Seung Eun Lee, Chul-Woung Kim, Hyo-Bin Im, Myungwha Jang
    Epidemiology and Health.2021; 43: e2021043.     CrossRef
  • Factors affecting smoking initiation and cessation among adult smokers in Fiji: A qualitative study
    Masoud Mohammadnezhad, Mondha Kengganpanich
    Tobacco Induced Diseases.2021; 19(December): 1.     CrossRef
  • “STOP the PUFF! Tayo’y mag bagong BAGA, SIGARILYO ay ITIGIL”: A Pilot Community-based Tobacco Intervention Project in an Urban Settlement
    Irene Salve D Joson-Vergara, Julie T Li-Yu
    Journal of Medicine, University of Santo Tomas.2021; 5(1): 586.     CrossRef
  • Smoking cessation correlates with a decrease in infection rates following total joint arthroplasty
    Christina Herrero, Alex Tang, Amy Wasterlain, Scott Sherman, Joseph Bosco, Claudette Lajam, Ran Schwarzkopf, James Slover
    Journal of Orthopaedics.2020; 21: 390.     CrossRef
Effects of Anti-Smoking Public Service Announcements on the Attitudes of Korean College Students toward Smoking
Kyoung Won Cho, Jakyoung Lee, Ji-hye Ryu, Soo Jeong Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2017;8(6):397-404.   Published online December 31, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2017.8.6.07
  • 3,068 View
  • 40 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives

This study aimed to identify the effects of anti-smoking public service announcements on the attitudes of Korean college students toward smoking.

Methods

This study involved students via convenience sampling from seven universities who were randomly assigned to four groups. All groups completed a preliminary questionnaire, before being shown a public service announcement twice, and then completed a post viewing questionnaire.

Results

For announcements with positive messages, the proportion of changes in beliefs and attitudes were 39.1% and 19.8%, respectively, whereas those with negative messages showed a greater proportion of changes in the beliefs (59.7%) and attitudes (40.3%). After adjusting for sex and change in belief, the message types and smoking status were identified as factors affecting the change in the participants attitudes. A negative message resulted in a greater change in attitudes (odds ratio [OR], 3.047; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.847–5.053). Ever-smokers including current smokers showed a greater positive change in attitude than never-smokers (OR, 6.965; 95% CI, 4.107–11.812).

Conclusion

This study found that positive anti-smoking public service announcements were more effective on attitude change than negative messages. Additionally these announcements were more effective among viewers who were current smokers or had a prior smoking experience.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Encouraging Firework Safety Through Public Service Announcements
    Stefano Cardin, Rachel Faber, Daniel Miller, Mary Elizabeth Gibson, Brett Lewellyn
    The Journal of Hand Surgery.2022; 47(6): 574.     CrossRef
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    Laxmi Kumari, Meenakshi Sood, Sandhya Gupta
    Pertanika Journal of Social Sciences and Humanitie.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Catarina Machado Azeredo, Emanuele Souza Marques, Letícia Martins Okada, Maria Fernanda Tourinho Peres
    Journal of Interpersonal Violence.2022; : 088626052211012.     CrossRef
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    Soo Jeong Kim, Kyoung Won Cho
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2019; 10(5): 274.     CrossRef
Brief Report
Activities of the Korean Institute of Tuberculosis
Sungweon Ryoo, Hee Jin Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(Suppl):S43-S49.   Published online December 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.10.007
  • 1,925 View
  • 20 Download
  • 14 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
The Korean National Tuberculosis Association (KNTA) set up the Korean Institute of Tuberculosis (KIT) in 1970 to foster research and technical activities pertaining to tuberculosis (TB). The KNTA/KIT had successfully conducted a countrywide TB prevalence survey from 1965 to 1995 at 5-year intervals. The survey results (decline in TB rates) established Korea as a country that had successfully implemented national control programs for TB. The KIT developed the Korea Tuberculosis Surveillance System and the Laboratory Management Information System, both of which were transferred to the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention after its establishment. The KIT functions as a central and supranational reference TB laboratory for microbiological and epidemiological research and provides training and education for health-care workers and medical practitioners. Recently, the KIT has expanded its activities to countries such as Ethiopia, Laos, and Timor-Leste to support TB control and prevention. The KIT will continue to support research activities and provide technical assistance in diagnosing the infection until it is completely eliminated in Korea.

Citations

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    Amer Kareem, Haiming Liu, Paul Sant
    Human-Centric Intelligent Systems.2022; 2(1-2): 31.     CrossRef
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    Ilona Karpiel, Ana Starcevic, Mirella Urzeniczok
    Sensors.2022; 22(16): 6312.     CrossRef
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    Mathematics.2022; 10(19): 3646.     CrossRef
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    Computers in Biology and Medicine.2021; 134: 104435.     CrossRef
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    Daniel A. Moses
    Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology.2021; 65(5): 498.     CrossRef
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    Wasif Khan, Nazar Zaki, Luqman Ali
    IEEE Access.2021; 9: 51747.     CrossRef
  • Incidence rate of active tuberculosis in solid organ transplant recipients: Data from a nationwide population cohort in a high‐endemic country
    Da Eun Kwon, Sang Hoon Han, Kyung Do Han, Yeonju La, Kyoung Hwa Lee
    Transplant Infectious Disease.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Hanan Farhat, George E. Sakr, Rima Kilany
    Machine Vision and Applications.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Aurelia Bustos, Antonio Pertusa, Jose-Maria Salinas, Maria de la Iglesia-Vayá
    Medical Image Analysis.2020; 66: 101797.     CrossRef
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    IEEE Access.2020; 8: 160749.     CrossRef
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    Chunli Qin, Demin Yao, Yonghong Shi, Zhijian Song
    BioMedical Engineering OnLine.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Relationship between Illness Perception and Health Behaviors among Patients with Tuberculosis: Mediating Effects of Self-efficacy and Family Support
    Hye-jin Kim, Myung Kyung Lee
    Korean Journal of Adult Nursing.2017; 29(6): 626.     CrossRef
  • Is Tuberculosis Still the Number One Infectious Disease in Korea?
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2014; 5: S1.     CrossRef
Invited Original Article
Incubation Period of Ebola Hemorrhagic Virus Subtype Zaire
Martin Eichner, Scott F. Dowell, Nina Firese
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2011;2(1):3-7.   Published online June 30, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2011.04.001
  • 2,773 View
  • 14 Download
  • 39 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Ebola hemorrhagic fever has killed over 1300 people, mostly in equatorial Africa. There is still uncertainty about the natural reservoir of the virus and about some of the factors involved in disease transmission. Until now, a maximum incubation period of 21 days has been assumed.
Methods
We analyzed data collected during the Ebola outbreak (subtype Zaire) in Kikwit, Democratic Republic of the Congo, in 1995 using maximum likelihood inference and assuming a log-normally distributed incubation period.
Results
The mean incubation period was estimated to be 12.7 days (standard deviation 4.31 days), indicating that about 4.1% of patients may have incubation periods longer than 21 days.
Conclusion
If the risk of new cases is to be reduced to 1% then 25 days should be used when investigating the source of an outbreak, when determining the duration of surveillance for contacts, and when declaring the end of an outbreak.

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    Robin Burk, Laura Bollinger, Joshua C. Johnson, Jiro Wada, Sheli R. Radoshitzky, Gustavo Palacios, Sina Bavari, Peter B. Jahrling, Jens H. Kuhn, Urs Greber
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PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives