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Review Article
Public health agencies’ use of social media for communication during pandemics: a scoping review of the literature
Babatunde Abiodun Balogun, Anne Hogden, Nenagh Kemp, Lin Yang, Maria Agaliotis
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2023;14(4):235-251.   Published online August 9, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2023.0095
  • 2,082 View
  • 156 Download
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Public health agencies (PHAs) have increasingly incorporated social media into their communication mix during successive pandemics in the 21st century. However, the quality, timing, and accuracy of their health messages have varied significantly, resulting in mixed outcomes for communication, audience engagement, and pandemic management. This study aimed to identify factors influencing the effectiveness of pandemic-related health messages shared by PHAs on social media and to report their impact on public engagement as documented in the literature. A scoping literature review was conducted following a predefined protocol. An electronic search of 7 relevant databases and 5 grey literature repositories yielded 9,714 papers published between January 2003 and November 2022. Seventy-three papers were deemed eligible and selected for review. The results underscored the insufficiency of social media guidance policies for PHAs. Six themes were identified: message source, message topic, message style, message timing, content credibility and reliability, and message recipient profile. These themes encompassed 20 variables that could inform PHAs’ social media public health communication during pandemics. Additionally, the findings revealed potential interconnectedness among the variables, and this study concluded by proposing a conceptual model that expands upon existing theoretical foundations for developing and evaluating pandemic-related health messaging.
Original Article
Quality of life in patients treated for COVID-19–associated mucormycosis at a tertiary care hospital
Pragya Kumar, Rajath Rao UR, Nilanjan Roy, Deepika Agrawal, Shamshad Ahmad, Kranti Bhavana
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2023;14(2):119-128.   Published online April 18, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2022.0307
  • 2,250 View
  • 61 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)–associated mucormycosis (CAM) has emerged as a formidable infection in patients with COVID-19. The aggressive management of CAM affects quality of life (QOL); thus, this study was designed to assess the QOL in patients with CAM at a tertiary healthcare institution.
Methods
This cross-sectional study of 57 patients with CAM was conducted over 6 months using a semi-structured standard questionnaire (the abbreviated World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire [WHO-BREF]) and a self-rated improvement (SRI) scale ranging from 0 to 9. Cut-off values of ≤52 and <7 were considered to indicate poor QOL and poor improvement, respectively. The correlations of QOL and SRI scores were evaluated using Spearman rho values.
Results
In total, 27 patients (47.4%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 34.9%–60.1%) and 26 patients (45.6%; 95% CI, 33.4%–58.4%) had poor QOL and poor SRI scores, respectively. The overall median (interquartile range) QOL score was 52 (41–63). Headache (adjusted B, −12.3), localized facial puffiness (adjusted B , −16.4), facial discoloration (adjusted B, −23.4), loosening of teeth (adjusted B, −18.7), and facial palsy (adjusted B, −38.5) wer e significantly associated with the QOL score in patients with CAM.
Conclusion
Approximately 1 in 2 patients with CAM had poor QOL and poor improvement. Various CAM symptoms were associated with QOL in these patients. Early recognition is the key to optimal treatment, improved outcomes, and improved QOL in patients with CAM.

Citations

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  • WHO BREF Quality of Life Score as a Prognostic Indicator of Survival in Patients recovered from COVID-19 Associated Rhino-Orbito-Cerebral Mucormycosis
    K. Nidhin Das, Vidhu Sharma, Vishudh Mohan, Kapil Soni, Ankita Chugh, Bikram Choudhury, Amit Goyal
    Indian Journal of Otolaryngology and Head & Neck S.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
Review Articles
SARS-CoV-2 in brief: from virus to prevention
Hassan Karami, Zeinab Karimi, Negin Karami
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2022;13(6):394-406.   Published online November 28, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2022.0155
  • 3,161 View
  • 100 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
The recent outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), ahighly transmissible virus with a likely animal origin, has posed major and unprecedentedchallenges to millions of lives across the affected nations of the world. This outbreak firstoccurred in China, and despite massive regional and global attempts shortly thereafter, itspread to other countries and caused millions of deaths worldwide. This review presents keyinformation about the characteristics of SARS-CoV-2 and its associated disease (namely,coronavirus disease 2019) and briefly discusses the origin of the virus. Herein, we also brieflysummarize the strategies used against viral spread and transmission.

Citations

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  • Polysaccharides and Lectins: A Natural Complementary Approach against the SARS-CoV-2 Pandemic
    Radu Lefter, Prairna Balyan, Ioana-Miruna Balmus, Abdellah Ech-Chahad, Ahmad Ali, Alin Ciobica, Antoneta Dacia Petroaie, Gabriela Halitchi, Bogdan Novac, Catalina Ionescu, Fatima Zahra Kamal
    Microbiology Research.2024; 15(2): 525.     CrossRef
  • Surveillance of endemic coronaviruses during the COVID‐19 pandemic in Iran, 2021–2022
    Hassan Karami, Kaveh Sadeghi, Sevrin Zadheidar, Fatemeh Saadatmand, Negar Mirsalehi, Nima Hoveidi Ardestani, Shirin Kalantari, Mohammad Farahmand, Jila Yavarian, Talat Mokhtari‐Azad
    Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
Scrutiny of COVID-19 response strategies among severely affected European nations
Shine Stephen, Alwin Issac, Rakesh Vadakkethil Radhakrishnan, Jaison Jacob, VR Vijay, Sam Jose, SM Azhar, Anoop S. Nair, Nadiya Krishnan, Rakesh Sharma, Manju Dhandapani
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(4):203-214.   Published online July 29, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0068
  • 10,914 View
  • 133 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 8 Crossref
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Although the health care systems in Europe are considered the global benchmark, European nations were severely affected by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. This manuscript aimed to examine the strategies implemented to combat the COVID-19 pandemic by France, the United Kingdom, Spain, Italy, Germany, and Russia and their outcomes in terms of the number of cases, testing, and deaths. This is the first review of its kind that extensively analyzes the preparedness, mitigation, and response strategies against the COVID-19 pandemic adopted by these nations. This paper further suggests a strategic preparedness model for future pandemics. From the analysis, we found that a decentralized approach, prompt decision-making and timely execution, coordination between local health authorities, and public participation in the implementation of strategies could substantially reduce the case fatality rate. Nations with a high percentage of gross domestic product invested in the health sector, as well as more nurses, physicians, hospital beds, intensive care unit beds, and ventilators, better managed the pandemic. Instead, nations that postponed their pandemic response by delaying tracking, tracing, testing, quarantine, and lockdown were badly affected. The lessons learned from the present pandemic could be used as a guide to prepare for further pandemics.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Psychological impact and development of autistic traits in children during the COVID 19 Pandemic: A study through Guardian
    Waseem Iqbal, Mudassir Hassan, Parveez Ahmed Mir, Syed Kaiser
    IP International Journal of Medical Paediatrics an.2024; 9(4): 135.     CrossRef
  • The Safety of Covishield (ChAdOx1 nCoV-19) Vaccine after Three Doses Vaccination under Mass Vaccination Program of Government of India
    Narinder Singh, Jaswinder Singh, Vikram Bhandari, Rahat Kumar
    AMEI's Current Trends in Diagnosis & Treatment.2024; 7(2): 36.     CrossRef
  • A phenomenological experience of trainers in preparedness training during COVID-19 pandemic: Trainers perspective from tertiary care institute
    Rakesh Sharma, Prasuna Jelly, Kusum Kumari, Arun Varghese, K. Hemanthkumar, C. Vasantha Kalyani, Neha Singh, Shalinee Rao
    International Journal of Africa Nursing Sciences.2024; 20: 100711.     CrossRef
  • Antibody titre in infants of covid-19 infected mothers
    Shivani Sharma, Pushkar Lal Meena, Rameshwar Lal Suman, Jaya Ninama
    IP International Journal of Medical Paediatrics an.2023; 9(2): 68.     CrossRef
  • A study to assess the level of stress among nursing students of IUST during COVID-19 pandemic
    Javaid Ahmad Mir, Asmat Parveen, Suheel Rashid Wani, Tayyibah Nisar, Sakeena Majeed, Wahida Kausar, Basit Ul Islam
    IP International Journal of Medical Paediatrics an.2022; 8(1): 15.     CrossRef
  • Strategy to prevent infection from Covid-19 among security officers of tertiary care centre: A preexperimental study
    Rakesh Sharma, KusumK Rohilla, Lisa Chadha, Priyanka Malhotra, S Sharmila, Prasuna Jelly
    Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care.2021; 10(9): 3257.     CrossRef
  • Post COVID-19 changes in the perception of the parents towards dentistry for their child
    Nahid Iftikhar, Shalini Dixit, Aditi Yadav
    IP International Journal of Medical Paediatrics an.2021; 7(3): 155.     CrossRef
  • A comparative study of attitudes towards COVID-19 vaccination in the rural and urban population of Uttarakhand, India
    Rakesh Sharma, Prasuna Jelly, Vishwas AS, Lisa Chadha, Vartika Saxena, Latika Mohan
    Journal of Global Health Economics and Policy.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
COVID-19: Weighing the Endeavors of Nations, with Time to Event Analysis
Shine Stephen, Alwin Issac, Jaison Jacob, VR Vijay, Rakesh Vadakkethil Radhakrishnan, Nadiya Krishnan
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2020;11(4):149-157.   Published online August 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2020.11.4.02
  • 7,981 View
  • 113 Download
  • 8 Web of Science
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF

The cataclysmic COVID-19 pandemic erupted silently causing colossal impact worldwide, the repercussions of which indicated a lackadaisical vigilance in preparation for such a pandemic. This review assessed the measures taken by nations to contain this pandemic. A literature review was conducted using Medline, Google Scholar, Science Direct, Scopus, and WHO website. There were 8 nations (selected from the GHS index list) appraised for containment strategies. This was achieved by using mortality rate (per million) as the primary endpoint. The nations which were proactive, initiated scientific strategies earlier with rigor, appeared to have succeeded in containing the pandemic, although it is still too early to arbitrate a verdict. The so called “pandemic war” mandates international, interdisciplinary, and interdepartmental collaboration. Furthermore, building trust and confidence between the government and the public, having transparent communication, information sharing, use of advanced research-technology, and plentiful resources are required in the fight against COVID-19.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Are population movement restrictions containing the COVID-19 cases in Sub-Saharan Africa?
    Maria Sassi, Gopal Trital
    Development Southern Africa.2023; 40(4): 881.     CrossRef
  • Communication to promote and support physical distancing for COVID-19 prevention and control
    Rebecca E Ryan, Charlotte Silke, Anne Parkhill, Ariane Virgona, Bronwen Merner, Shauna Hurley, Louisa Walsh, Caroline de Moel-Mandel, Lina Schonfeld, Adrian GK Edwards, Jessica Kaufman, Alison Cooper, Rachel Kar Yee Chung, Karla Solo, Margaret Hellard, Gi
    Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Paediatric orthopaedic surgery during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. A safe and pragmatic approach to service provision
    Ibrar Majid, Tahani Fowzi Al Ali, M.A. Serour, Hisham M. Elsayed, Yousra Samir, Ajay Prashanth Dsouza, Hayder Saleh AlSaadi, Sattar Alshryda
    The Surgeon.2022; 20(6): e338.     CrossRef
  • An evidence-based nursing care guide for critically ill patients with COVID-19: A scoping Review
    Manju Dhandapani, Vijay VR, Nadiya Krishnan, Lakshmanan Gopichandran, Alwin Issac, Shine Stephen, Jaison Jacob, Thilaka Thilaka, Lakshmi Narayana Yaddanapudi, Sivashanmugam Dhandapani
    Asian Journal of Nursing Education and Research.2022; : 144.     CrossRef
  • An examination of Thailand’s health care system and strategies during the management of the COVID-19 pandemic
    Alwin Issac, Rakesh Vadakkethil Radhakrishnan, VR Vijay, Shine Stephen, Nadiya Krishnan, Jaison Jacob, Sam Jose, SM Azhar, Anoop S Nair
    Journal of Global Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Somatoform Symptoms among Frontline Health-Care Providers during the COVID-19 Pandemic
    Jaison Jacob, VR Vijay, Alwin Issac, Shine Stephen, Manju Dhandapani, Nadiya Krishnan, VR Rakesh, Sam Jose, Anoop S. Nair, SM Azhar
    Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine.2021; 43(3): 272.     CrossRef
  • How the nations should gear up for future pandemics?
    Alwin Issac, VR Vijay, Nadiya Krishnan, Jaison Jacob, Shine Stephen, Rakesh Vadakkethil Radhakrishnan, Manju Dhandapani
    Journal of Global Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Determinants of Willingness for COVID-19 Vaccine: Implications for Enhancing the Proportion of Vaccination Among Indians
    Jaison Jacob, Shine Stephen, Alwin Issac, Nadiya Krishnan, Rakesh Vadakkethil Radhakrishnan, Vijay V R, Manju Dhandapani, Sam Jose, Azhar SM, Anoop S Nair
    Cureus.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • O Papel da Telessaúde na Pandemia Covid-19: Uma Experiência Brasileira
    Rodolfo Souza da Silva, Carlos André Aita Schmtiz, Erno Harzheim, Cynthia Goulart Molina-Bastos, Elise Botteselle de Oliveira, Rudi Roman, Roberto Nunes Umpierre, Marcelo Rodrigues Gonçalves
    Ciência & Saúde Coletiva.2021; 26(6): 2149.     CrossRef
  • Scrutiny of COVID-19 response strategies among severely affected European nations
    Shine Stephen, Alwin Issac, Rakesh Vadakkethil Radhakrishnan, Jaison Jacob, VR Vijay, Sam Jose, SM Azhar, Anoop S. Nair, Nadiya Krishnan, Rakesh Sharma, Manju Dhandapani
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2021; 12(4): 203.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Assessment of Intensive Vaccination and Antiviral Treatment in 2009 Influenza Pandemic in Korea
Chaeshin Chu, Sunmi Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2015;6(1):47-51.   Published online February 28, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.11.007
  • 2,836 View
  • 19 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
We characterized and assessed public health measures, including intensive vaccination and antiviral treatment, implemented during the 2009 influenza pandemic in the Republic of Korea.
Methods
A mathematical model for the 2009 influenza pandemic is formulated. The transmission rate, the vaccination rate, the antiviral treatment rate, and the hospitalized rate are estimated using the least-squares method for the 2009 data of the incidence curves of the infected, vaccinated, treated, and hospitalized.
Results
The cumulative number of infected cases has reduced significantly following the implementation of the intensive vaccination and antiviral treatment. In particular, the intensive vaccination was the most critical factor that prevented severe outbreak.
Conclusion
We have found that the total infected proportion would increase by approximately six times under the half of vaccination rates.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Modeling influenza transmission dynamics with media coverage data of the 2009 H1N1 outbreak in Korea
    Yunhwan Kim, Ana Vivas Barber, Sunmi Lee, Roberto Barrio
    PLOS ONE.2020; 15(6): e0232580.     CrossRef
  • Doing Mathematics with Aftermath of Pandemic Influenza 2009
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2015; 6(1): 1.     CrossRef
Assessment of the Intensive Countermeasures in the 2009 Pandemic Influenza in Korea
Jin Hyuk Choi, Yunhwan Kim, Seoyun Choe, Sunmi Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(2):101-107.   Published online April 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.03.003
  • 2,734 View
  • 20 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
It is critical to implement effective multiple countermeasures to mitigate or retain the spread of pandemic influenza. We propose a mathematical pandemic influenza model to assess the effectiveness of multiple countermeasures implemented in 2009.
Methods
Age-specific parameters, including the transmission rate, the proportion of asymptomatic individuals, the vaccination rate, the social distancing rate, and the antiviral treatment rate are estimated using the least-square method calibrated to the incidence data.
Results
The multiple interventions (intensive vaccination, social distancing, antivrial treatment) were successfully implemented resulting in the dramatic reduction in the total number of incidence.
Conclusion
The model output is sensitive to age-specific parameters and this leads to the fact that a more elaborate age group model should be developed and extensive further studies must be followed.
Brief Report
Public Health Crisis Preparedness and Response in Korea
Hye-Young Lee, Mi-Na Oh, Yong-Shik Park, Chaeshin Chu, Tae-Jong Son
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2013;4(5):278-284.   Published online October 31, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.09.008
  • 3,502 View
  • 21 Download
  • 22 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Since the 2006 Pandemic Influenza Preparedness and Response Plan according to the World Health Organization’s recommendation, the Republic of Korea has prepared and periodically evaluated the plan to respond to various public health crises including pandemic influenza. Korea has stockpiled 13,000,000 doses of antiviral drugs covering 26% of the Korean population and runs 519 isolated beds in 16 medical institutions. The division of public health crisis response in Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are in charge of responding to public health crises caused by emerging infectious diseases including severe acute respiratory syndrome, avian influenza human infection, and pandemic influenza. Its job description includes preparing for emerging infectious diseases, securing medical resources during a crisis, activating the emergency response during the crisis, and fortification of capabilities of public health personnel. It could evolve into a comprehensive national agency to deal with public health crisis based on the experience of previous national emerging infectious diseases.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Investigating the Functional, Non-structural, and Structural Safety Status in Selected Hospitals in Ahvaz
    Shirin Shirzad, ZeinabSadat Nezamodin, Mansour Zahiri
    Jundishapur Journal of Health Sciences.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Viral Entanglements
    Timothy Gitzen
    Current Anthropology.2023; 64(2): 172.     CrossRef
  • No one left behind: risk communication to the street vendors during COVID-19 social distancing
    Pham Tien Thanh, Hanh Thi Hong Nguyen, Le Thi Bao Ngan, Doan My Duyen Nguyen, Gia Han Phan, Thi My Nhung Nguyen
    Library Hi Tech.2022; 40(2): 357.     CrossRef
  • Spatial Variation in Risk for Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Subtype H5N6 Viral Infections in South Korea: Poultry Population-Based Case–Control Study
    Saleem Ahmad, Kye-Young Koh, Dae-Sung Yoo, Jae-Il Lee
    Veterinary Sciences.2022; 9(3): 135.     CrossRef
  • The Evolution of Vigilance and Its Atrophy Preceding the COVID-19 Global Pandemic
    Theodore J. Witek, Robert Schwartz
    Frontiers in Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Healthcare Workers’ Knowledge, Attitude, Practice and Perceived Health Facility Preparedness Regarding COVID-19 in Sierra Leone
    Sulaiman Kanu, Peter Bai James, Abdulai Jawo Bah, John Alimamy Kabba, Musa Salieu Kamara, Christine Ellen Elleanor Williams, Joseph Sam Kanu
    Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare.2021; Volume 14: 67.     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 Pandemic in Hong Kong and Gaza Strip: Lessons Learned from Two Densely Populated Locations in the World
    Hammoda Abu-Odah, Sheena Ramazanu, Eslam Saleh, Jonathan Bayuo, Yehia Abed, Motasem Said Salah
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2021; 12(1): 44.     CrossRef
  • Citizens’ Opinion on Governmental Response to COVID-19 Outbreak: A Qualitative Study from Iran
    Kamran Bagheri Lankarani, Behnam Honarvar, Ahmad Kalateh Sadati, Mohammad Reza Rahmanian Haghighi
    INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, .2021; 58: 004695802110249.     CrossRef
  • The Korean government’s public health responses to the COVID-19 epidemic through the lens of industrial policy
    Hee-Young Shin
    International Review of Applied Economics.2021; 35(6): 851.     CrossRef
  • Preparedness of Frontline Doctors in Jordan Healthcare Facilities to COVID-19 Outbreak
    Aiman Suleiman, Isam Bsisu, Hasan Guzu, Abeer Santarisi, Murad Alsatari, Ala’ Abbad, Ahmad Jaber, Taima’a Harb, Ahmad Abuhejleh, Nisreen Nadi, Abdelkarim Aloweidi, Mahmoud Almustafa
    International Journal of Environmental Research an.2020; 17(9): 3181.     CrossRef
  • Lessons learned from Korea: COVID-19 pandemic
    Hazhir Moradi, Atefeh Vaezi
    Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology.2020; 41(7): 873.     CrossRef
  • Lesson Learned from the Power of Open Data: Resolving the Mask Shortage Problem Caused by COVID-19 in South Korea
    Haklae Kim
    Sustainability.2020; 13(1): 278.     CrossRef
  • A Systematic Narrative Review of Comprehensive Preparedness Strategies of Healthcare Resources for a Large Resurgence of COVID-19 Nationally, with Local or Regional Epidemics: Present Era and Beyond
    Young Kyung Yoon, Jacob Lee, Sang Il Kim, Kyong Ran Peck
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Jonggul Lee, Bo Youl Choi, Eunok Jung
    Journal of Theoretical Biology.2018; 454: 320.     CrossRef
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    Sangwoo Tak, Anton Jareb, Suon Choi, Marvin Sikes, Yeon Hwa Choi, Hyeong-wook Boo
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2018; 9(1): 32.     CrossRef
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    Soyoung Kim, Jonggul Lee, Eunok Jung
    Journal of Theoretical Biology.2017; 412: 74.     CrossRef
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    Chulwoo Rhee, Howard Burkom, Chang-gyo Yoon, Miles Stewart, Yevgeniy Elbert, Aaron Katz, Sangwoo Tak
    Health Security.2016; 14(3): 152.     CrossRef
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    Eun Kyung CHOI, Jong-Koo LEE
    Korean Journal of Medical History.2016; 25(3): 489.     CrossRef
  • Crisis prevention and management by infection control nurses during the Middle East respiratory coronavirus outbreak in Korea
    Jeong Sil Choi, Kyung Mi Kim
    American Journal of Infection Control.2016; 44(4): 480.     CrossRef
  • Ebola virus disease in nonendemic countries
    Samson Sai-Yin Wong, Sally Cheuk-Ying Wong
    Journal of the Formosan Medical Association.2015; 114(5): 384.     CrossRef
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    Jonggul Lee, Eunok Jung
    Journal of Theoretical Biology.2015; 380: 60.     CrossRef
  • How to Manage a Public Health Crisis and Bioterrorism in Korea
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2013; 4(5): 223.     CrossRef
Original Article
Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Pandemic Influenza A(H1N1) 2009 Vaccine Based on an Outbreak Investigation During the 2010–2011 Season in Korean Military Camps
Kyo-Hyun Kim, Yoon Gu Choi, Hyun-Bae Yoon, Jung-Woo Lee, Hyun-Wook Kim, Chaeshin Chu, Young-Joon Park
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2013;4(4):209-214.   Published online August 31, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.07.002
  • 3,130 View
  • 20 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
In December 2010, there was an outbreak of acute febrile respiratory disease in many Korean military camps that were not geographically related. A laboratory analysis confirmed a number of these cases to be infected by the pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 (H1N1pdm09) virus. Because mass vaccination against H1N1pdm09 was implemented at the infected military camps eleven months ago, the outbreak areas in which both vaccinated and nonvaccinated individuals were well mixed, gave us an opportunity to evaluate the effectiveness of H1N1pdm09 vaccine through a retrospective cohort study design.
Methods
A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to the three military camps in which the outbreak occurred for case detection, determination of vaccination status, and characterization of other risk factors. The overall response rate was 86.8% (395/455). Case was defined as fever (≥38 °C) with cough or sore throat, influenza-like illness (ILI), and vaccination status verified by vaccination registry. Crude vaccine effectiveness (VE) was calculated as “1 − attack rate in vaccinated individuals/attack rate in nonvaccinated individuals”, and adjusted VE was calculated as “1 – odds ratio” using logistic regression adjusted for potential confounding factor. A number of ILI definitions were used to test the robustness of the result.
Results
The attack rate of ILI was 12.8% in register-verified vaccinated individuals and 24.0% in nonvaccinated individuals. The crude VE was thus calculated to be 46.8% [95% confidence interval (CI): 14.5–66.9]. The adjusted VE rate was 46.8% (95% CI: –9.4 to 74.1). Various combinations of ILI symptoms also showed similar VE rates.
Conclusion
We evaluated the effectiveness of H1N1pdm09 vaccine in the 2010–2011 season in an outbreak setting. Although the result was not sensitive to any analytical method used and ILI case definition, the magnitude of effectiveness was lower than estimated in the 2009–2010 season.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Assessment of Intensive Vaccination and Antiviral Treatment in 2009 Influenza Pandemic in Korea
    Chaeshin Chu, Sunmi Lee
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2015; 6(1): 47.     CrossRef
  • Was the Mass Vaccination Effective During the Influenza Pandemic 2009–2010 in Korea?
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2013; 4(4): 177.     CrossRef
Article
Sensitivity Analysis of the Parameters of Korea’s Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Plan
Chaeshin Chu, Junehawk Lee, Dong Hoon Choi, Seung-Ki Youn, Jong-Koo Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2011;2(3):210-215.   Published online December 31, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2011.11.048
  • 3,094 View
  • 20 Download
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Our aim was to evaluate Korea’s Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Plan.
Methods
We conducted a sensitivity analysis on the expected number of outpatients and hospital bed occupancy, with 1,000,000 parameter combinations, in a situation of pandemic influenza, using the mathematical simulation program InfluSim.
Results
Given the available resources in Korea, antiviral treatment and social distancing must be combined to reduce the number of outpatients and hospitalizations sufficiently; any single intervention is not enough. The antiviral stockpile of 4–6% is sufficient for the expected eligible number of cases to be treated. However, the eligible number assumed (30% for severe cases and 26% for extremely severe cases) is very low compared to the corresponding number in European countries, where up to 90% of the population are assumed to be eligible for antiviral treatment.
Conclusions
A combination of antiviral treatment and social distancing can mitigate a pandemic, but will only bring it under control for the most optimistic parameter combinations.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Working memory capacity predicts individual differences in social-distancing compliance during the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States
    Weizhen Xie, Stephen Campbell, Weiwei Zhang
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.2020; 117(30): 17667.     CrossRef
  • Assessment of Intensive Vaccination and Antiviral Treatment in 2009 Influenza Pandemic in Korea
    Chaeshin Chu, Sunmi Lee
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2015; 6(1): 47.     CrossRef
  • Doing Mathematics with Aftermath of Pandemic Influenza 2009
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2015; 6(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Roll the Dice
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2014; 5(5): 243.     CrossRef
  • Journal Publishing: Never Ending Saga
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2014; 5(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Summing Up Again
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2014; 5(4): 177.     CrossRef
  • Years of Epidemics (2009–2011): Pandemic Influenza and Foot-and-Mouth Disease Epidemic in Korea
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2013; 4(3): 125.     CrossRef
  • Public Health Crisis Preparedness and Response in Korea
    Hye-Young Lee, Mi-Na Oh, Yong-Shik Park, Chaeshin Chu, Tae-Jong Son
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2013; 4(5): 278.     CrossRef
  • Was the Mass Vaccination Effective During the Influenza Pandemic 2009–2010 in Korea?
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2013; 4(4): 177.     CrossRef
  • How to Manage a Public Health Crisis and Bioterrorism in Korea
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2013; 4(5): 223.     CrossRef

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives