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Original Article
Phylogenetic and genome-wide mutational analysis of SARS-CoV-2 strains circulating in Nigeria: no implications for attenuated COVID-19 outcomes
Daniel B. Kolawole, Malachy I. Okeke
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2022;13(2):101-113.   Published online April 22, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0329
  • 1,268 View
  • 45 Download
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the causative agent of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The COVID-19 incidence and mortality rates are low in Nigeria compared to global trends. This research mapped the evolution of SARS-CoV-2 circulating in Nigeria and globally to determine whether the Nigerian isolates are genetically distinct from strains circulating in regions of the world with a high disease burden. Methods: Bayesian phylogenetics using BEAST 2.0, genetic similarity analyses, and genomewide mutational analyses were used to characterize the strains of SARS-CoV-2 isolated in Nigeria. Results: SARS-CoV-2 strains isolated in Nigeria showed multiple lineages and possible introductions from Europe and Asia. Phylogenetic clustering and sequence similarity analyses demonstrated that Nigerian isolates were not genetically distinct from strains isolated in other parts of the globe. Mutational analysis demonstrated that the D614G mutation in the spike protein, the P323L mutation in open reading frame 1b (and more specifically in NSP12), and the R203K/ G204R mutation pair in the nucleocapsid protein were most prevalent in the Nigerian isolates. Conclusion: The SARS-CoV-2 strains in Nigeria were neither phylogenetically nor genetically distinct from virus strains circulating in other countries of the world. Thus, differences in SARS-CoV-2 genomes are not a plausible explanation for the attenuated COVID-19 outcomes in Nigeria.
Review Article
Yersinia pestis antibiotic resistance: a systematic review
Chen Lei, Suresh Kumar
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2022;13(1):24-36.   Published online February 18, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0288
  • 2,029 View
  • 101 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Yersinia pestis, the cause of plague and a potential biological weapon, has always been a threatening pathogen. Some strains of Y. pestis have varying degrees of antibiotic resistance. Thus, this systematic review was conducted to alert clinicians to this pathogen’s potential antimicrobial resistance. A review of the literature was conducted for experimental reports and systematic reviews on the topics of plague, Y. pestis, and antibiotic resistance. From 1995 to 2021, 7 Y. pestis isolates with 4 antibiotic resistance mechanisms were reported. In Y. pestis 17/95, 16/95, and 2180H, resistance was mediated by transferable plasmids. Each plasmid contained resistance genes encoded within specific transposons. Strain 17/95 presented multiple drug resistance, since plasmid 1202 contained 10 resistance determinants. Strains 16/95 and 2180H showed single antibiotic resistance because both additional plasmids in these strains carried only 1 antimicrobial determinant. Strains 12/87, S19960127, 56/13, and 59/13 exhibited streptomycin resistance due to an rpsl gene mutation, a novel mechanism that was discovered recently. Y. pestis can acquire antibiotic resistance in nature not only via conjugative transfer of antimicrobial-resistant plasmids from other bacteria, but also by gene point mutations. Global surveillance should be strengthened to identify antibiotic-resistant Y. pestis strains by whole-genome sequencing and drug susceptibility testing.
Original Articles
Genome-Wide Identification and Characterization of Point Mutations in the SARS-CoV-2 Genome
Jun-Sub Kim, Jun-Hyeong Jang, Jeong-Min Kim, Yoon-Seok Chung, Cheon-Kwon Yoo, Myung-Guk Han
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2020;11(3):101-111.   Published online May 14, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2020.11.3.05
  • 11,472 View
  • 496 Download
  • 49 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) emerged in Wuhan, China, in December 2019 and has been rapidly spreading worldwide. Although the causal relationship among mutations and the features of SARS-CoV-2 such as rapid transmission, pathogenicity, and tropism, remains unclear, our results of genomic mutations in SARS-CoV-2 may help to interpret the interaction between genomic characterization in SARS-CoV-2 and infectivity with the host.

Methods

A total of 4,254 genomic sequences of SARS-CoV-2 were collected from the Global Initiative on Sharing all Influenza Data (GISAID). Multiple sequence alignment for phylogenetic analysis and comparative genomic approach for mutation analysis were conducted using Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis (MEGA), and an in-house program based on Perl language, respectively.

Results

Phylogenetic analysis of SARS-CoV-2 strains indicated that there were 3 major clades including S, V, and G, and 2 subclades (G.1 and G.2). There were 767 types of synonymous and 1,352 types of non-synonymous mutation. ORF1a, ORF1b, S, and N genes were detected at high frequency, whereas ORF7b and E genes exhibited low frequency. In the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of the S gene, 11 non-synonymous mutations were observed in the region adjacent to the angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) binding site.

Conclusion

It has been reported that the rapid infectivity and transmission of SARS-CoV-2 associated with host receptor affinity are derived from several mutations in its genes. Without these genetic mutations to enhance evolutionary adaptation, species recognition, host receptor affinity, and pathogenicity, it would not survive. It is expected that our results could provide an important clue in understanding the genomic characteristics of SARS-CoV-2.

Comparison of Three Different Methods for Detection of IL28 rs12979860 Polymorphisms as a Predictor of Treatment Outcome in Patients with Hepatitis C Virus
Abolfazl Fateh, Mohammadreza Aghasadeghi, Seyed D. Siadat, Farzam Vaziri, Farzin Sadeghi, Roohollah Fateh, Hossein Keyvani, Alireza H. Tasbiti, Shamsi Yari, Angila Ataei-Pirkooh, Seyed H. Monavari
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2016;7(2):83-89.   Published online April 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2015.11.004
  • 1,975 View
  • 16 Download
  • 17 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study aimed to evaluate the specificity, sensitivity, cost, and turn-around time of three methods of gene polymorphism analysis and to study the relationship between IL28B rs12979860 and SVR rate to pegIFN-α/RVB therapy among patients with chronic hepatitis C.
Methods
A total of 100 samples from chronic hepatitis C patients were analyzed in parallel using the three methods: direct sequencing, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS)-PCR.
Results
The different profiles for IL28B rs12979860 alleles (CC, CT, and TT) obtained with PCR-RFLP, ARMS-PCR, and direct sequencing were consistent among the three methods. Prevalence of rs12979860 genotypes CC, CT and TT in HCV genotype 1a was 10(19.6%), 35(68.6%), and six (11.8%), respectively, and in HCV genotype 31, it was 13(26.5%), 31(63.3%), and five (10.2%), respectively. No significant difference was seen between rs12979860 genotype and HCV genotype (p = 0.710).
Conclusion
Screening by ARMS – PCR SNOP detection represents the most efficient and reliable method to determine HCV polymorphisms in routine clinical practice.
Infectivity of Homologous Recombinant HIV-1 Pseudo-virus with Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor-related Mutations from Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy Experienced Patients
Oh-Kyung Kwon, Ju-yeon Choi, Eun-Jin Kim, Sung Soon Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2011;2(1):23-28.   Published online June 30, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2011.04.006
  • 1,674 View
  • 13 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
In this study, the viral fitness of pseudo-viruses with a drug-resistant site in the reverse transcriptase (RT) region of the genome was investigated. The pseudo-viruses were derived from highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-experienced HIV/AIDS patients.
Methods
HIV-1 RNA was extracted from the plasma of HAART-experienced (KRB9149, KRB7021, KRC1097) and HAART-naïve (KRC5180, KRC5123) HIV-1 patients. The RT gene from the extracted viral RNA was amplified and the polymerase chain reaction product was cloned from the pHXB2Δ2-261 RT vector. C8166 and TZM-bl cell lines were used as the HIV-1 replication capacity measurement system. To quantify the infectivity of homologous recombinant HIV-1, the infectivity derived from each pseudo-virus was compared with the infectivity of the reference strain HXB2.
Results
Patient-derived HIV-1 was cotransfected into C8166 cells and the expression level of the p24 antigen was measured. The expression was high in the HIV-1 isolates from patients KRC5180 and KRB9149 and low in patients KRB7021, KRC5123, and KRC1097, when compared with the reference strain. The infectivity of the pseudo-virus measured in TZM-bl cells decreased in the order, reference strain HXB2 > KRC5180 > KRC5123 > KRB9149 > KRB7021 > KRC1097.
Conclusion
In this study, HIV-1 infectivity of the drug-resistant strain isolated from HAART-experienced patients with HIV/AIDS was found to be lower than the infectivity of the reference strain HXB2. This study provides useful data for the phenotypic susceptibility assay in HAART-experienced patients infected with HIV-1.

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives