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Original Article
Army Soldiers’ Knowledge of, Attitude Towards, and Preventive Behavior Towards Tuberculosis in Korea
Yun Choi, Geum Hee Jeong
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2018;9(5):269-277.   Published online October 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2018.9.5.09
  • 5,255 View
  • 142 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The aim of this study was to gather information about Korean Army soldiers’ attitude towards tuberculosis to enable the development of an informed educational program and potential intervention plans.

Methods

There were 500 male soldiers serving in the Korean Army who responded to questionnaires regarding knowledge of, attitudes towards, and preventive behavior towards tuberculosis. The questionnaires were collected between September 10 until October 1, 2014. Participants’ characteristic that influenced differences in knowledge, attitudes, and preventive behavior towards tuberculosis were compared by t test. Variables that influenced preventive behavior were identified by multiple regression analysis.

Results

The mean scores assessing knowledge of, attitude, and preventive behavior towards tuberculosis were 11.64 (± 4.03) out of 20 points, 3.21 (± 0.38) out of 4 points, and 2.88 (± 0.42) out of 4 points, respectively. Non-smokers were more knowledgeable about tuberculosis than smokers. Participants who had family or friends with tuberculosis had better knowledge and a more productive attitude to tuberculosis. Participants who were educated or obtained information about tuberculosis, received better scores in all areas of knowledge, attitude and preventive behavior compared to other participants. Non-smoking, family or friends who have had tuberculosis, obtaining information about tuberculosis, and positive attitudes towards treatment and preventive education had an explanatory power of 24.6% with regard to preventive behavior against tuberculosis.

Conclusion

More relatable, systemized education should be provided regularly to improve soldiers’ knowledge of, attitudes towards, and prevention against tuberculosis in the Republic of Korea Army.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Knowledge, Attitudes, and Preventative Behavior Toward Tuberculosis in University Students in Indonesia
    Irma Melyani Puspitasari, Rano Kurnia Sinuraya, Arini Nurhaqiqi Aminudin, Rika Rahmi Kamilah
    Infection and Drug Resistance.2022; Volume 15: 4721.     CrossRef
  • Factors Affecting Preventive Behavior related to Tuberculosis among University Students in Korea: Focused on Knowledge, Attitude and Optimistic Bias related to Tuberculosis
    Myung Soon Kwon, Yun Choi
    Journal of Korean Academy of Fundamentals of Nursi.2020; 27(3): 236.     CrossRef
  • Assessment of knowledge, attitude and practice on tuberculosis among teacher trainees of Samtse College of Education, Bhutan
    Thinley Dorji, Tandin Tshering, Kinley Wangdi, Ritesh G. Menezes
    PLOS ONE.2020; 15(11): e0241923.     CrossRef
  • The Infectivity of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Korean Army Units: Evidence from Outbreak Investigations
    Chang-gyo Yoon, Dong Yoon Kang, Jaehun Jung, Soo Yon Oh, Jin Beom Lee, Mi-Hyun Kim, Younsuk Seo, Hee-Jin Kim
    Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases.2019; 82(4): 298.     CrossRef
Articles
Acute Health Effects Among Military Personnel Participating in the Cleanup of the Hebei Spirit Oil Spill, 2007, in Taean County, Korea
Jin Gwack, Ju Hyung Lee, Young Ah Kang, Kyu-jin Chang, Moo Sik Lee, Jee Young Hong
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2012;3(4):206-212.   Published online December 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2012.10.001
  • 2,029 View
  • 17 Download
  • 13 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study was conducted to investigate acute health effects and its related factors among military personnel participating in the cleanup of the 2007 Hebei Spirit oil spill accident in Taean county, Korea.
Methods
We collected data on acute symptoms during the cleanup and their predictors using a self-administered questionnaire to 2624 military personnel. Selfreported symptoms included six neurologic symptoms, five respiratory symptoms, two dermatologic symptoms, three ophthalmic symptoms, and three general symptoms. Independent variables were demographic factors (gender, age, education level, and rank), health behavioral factors (smoking history and usage of the personal protective equipment such as masks and gloves), and occupational history such as where and for how long individuals participated in cleanup.
Results
The duration of work days was significantly associated with 17 acute symptoms except for itchiness and red skin.Working in Taean county also increased the risk of most acute symptoms except headache and back pain. In regard to personal protective equipment, wearing masks was mainly related to the development of respiratory symptoms such as sore throat and wearing other protective equipment was related to the development of sore throat, back pain, headache, and cough. Military personnel younger than 25 years reported 4.66 times more hot flushing and 5.39 times more itchiness than those older than 25 years.
Conclusion
It should be emphasized that for early-stage cleanup the number of workers should be minimized, sufficient personal protective equipment with approved quality for blocking noxious gas should be supplied, and systematic health care for the workers should be provided. Health effects could be diminished by providing adequate education regarding the appropriate use of protective equipment, especially to nonprofessionals such as residents and volunteers. To make disaster response expeditious, a national and regional preparedness plans and a professional response team for emergency environmental assessment and emergency action should be established beforehand to make prompt decisions.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Barriers to the effective management of water streams in uMlazi township, KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa
    Ntokozo Amanda Xaba, Stanley Onwubu
    International Journal of Research in Business and .2022; 11(3): 217.     CrossRef
  • Self-reported myocardial infarction and fatal coronary heart disease among oil spill workers and community members 5 years after Deepwater Horizon
    Jean Strelitz, Alexander P. Keil, David B. Richardson, Gerardo Heiss, Marilie D. Gammon, Richard K. Kwok, Dale P. Sandler, Lawrence S. Engel
    Environmental Research.2019; 168: 70.     CrossRef
  • Neurological symptoms associated with oil spill response exposures: Results from the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Coast Guard Cohort Study
    Jayasree Krishnamurthy, Lawrence S. Engel, Li Wang, Erica G. Schwartz, Kate Christenbury, Benjamin Kondrup, John Barrett, Jennifer A. Rusiecki
    Environment International.2019; 131: 104963.     CrossRef
  • Activation of the nucleotide excision repair pathway by crude oil exposure: A translational study from model organisms to the Hebei Spirit Oil Spill Cohort
    Youngho Kim, Jaeseong Jeong, Nivedita Chatterjee, Un Hyuk Yim, Jung-Hwan Kwon, Myung-Sook Park, Jinhee Choi
    Environmental Pollution.2019; 254: 112997.     CrossRef
  • The deepwater horizon oil spill coast guard cohort study: A cross-sectional study of acute respiratory health symptoms
    Melannie Alexander, Lawrence S. Engel, Nathan Olaiya, Li Wang, John Barrett, Laura Weems, Erica G. Schwartz, Jennifer A. Rusiecki
    Environmental Research.2018; 162: 196.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of Korea and World Marine Oil Spill Studies: Long-term Trend Analysis Through in-depth Literature Review
    Joungyoon Chun, Bosik Kang, Choong-Ki Kim
    Journal of the Korean Society for Marine Environme.2018; 21(1): 30.     CrossRef
  • Deepwater Horizon oil spill exposures and nonfatal myocardial infarction in the GuLF STUDY
    Jean Strelitz, Lawrence S. Engel, Richard K. Kwok, Aubrey K. Miller, Aaron Blair, Dale P. Sandler
    Environmental Health.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A Retrospective Mid- and Long-term Follow-up Study on the Changes in Hematologic Parameters in the Highly Exposed Residents of the Hebei Spirit Oil Spill in Taean, South Korea
    Young-Hyun Choi, Jee-Young Hong, Moo-Sik Lee
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2017; 8(5): 358.     CrossRef
  • Human health and ecological assessment programs for Hebei Spirit oil spill accident of 2007: Status, lessons, and future challenges
    Dawoon Jung, Jung-Ah Kim, Myung-Sook Park, Un Hyuk Yim, Kyungho Choi
    Chemosphere.2017; 173: 180.     CrossRef
  • Potential Health and Safety Concerns for Oil spill Responders Working in Proximity to Spills of Unconventional Crude Oil
    P.G. Lambert, M. Goldthorp, B. Fieldhouse, N. Jones, S. Laforest, F. Mirnaghi, C.E. Brown
    International Oil Spill Conference Proceedings.2017; 2017(1): 2110.     CrossRef
  • Health Effect Assessment on Cleanup Workers of an Oil Spill in Yeosu
    Geunbae Kim, Tack Shin Kang, Mira Yoon, Hyejung Jo, Youngkyung Joo, Seung Do Yu, Bo Eun Lee
    Korean Journal of Environmental Health Sciences.2016; 42(6): 385.     CrossRef
  • Heavy Metals and Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon Concentrations in Surface Water of Esi River, Western Niger Delta
    Samuel O. Akporido, Percy C. Onianwa
    Research Journal of Environmental Sciences.2015; 9(2): 88.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of Pulmonary and Systemic Toxicity of Oil Dispersant (COREXIT EC9500A®) following Acute Repeated Inhalation Exposure
    Jenny R. Roberts, Stacey E. Anderson, Hong Kan, Kristine Krajnak, Janet A. Thompson, Allison Kenyon, William T. Goldsmith, Walter McKinney, David G. Frazer, Mark Jackson, Jeffrey S. Fedan
    Environmental Health Insights.2014; 8s1: EHI.S15262.     CrossRef

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives