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Review Articles
Predictors of outcomes 3 to 12 months after traumatic brain injury: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Younes Iderdar, Maryem Arraji, Nadia Al Wachami, Morad Guennouni, Karima Boumendil, Yassmine Mourajid, Noureddine Elkhoudri, Elmadani Saad, Mohamed Chahboune
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2024;15(1):3-17.   Published online February 5, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2023.0288
  • 1,925 View
  • 111 Download
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
The exact factors predicting outcomes following traumatic brain injury (TBI) remain elusive. In this systematic review and meta-analysis, we examined factors influencing outcomes in adult patients with TBI, from 3 months to 1 year after injury. A search of four electronic databases—PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and ScienceDirect—yielded 29 studies for review and 16 for meta-analysis, in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis guidelines. In patients with TBI of any severity, mean differences were observed in age (8.72 years; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.77–12.66 years), lymphocyte count (−0.15 109/L; 95% CI, −0.18 to −0.11), glucose levels (1.20 mmol/L; 95% CI, 0.73–1.68), and haemoglobin levels (−0.91 g/dL; 95% CI, −1.49 to −0.33) between those with favourable and unfavourable outcomes. The prevalence rates of unfavourable outcomes were as follows: abnormal cisterns, 65.7%; intracranial pressure above 20 mmHg, 52.9%; midline shift of 5 mm or more, 63%; hypotension, 71%; hypoxia, 86.8%; blood transfusion, 70.3%; and mechanical ventilation, 90%. Several predictors were strongly associated with outcome. Specifically, age, lymphocyte count, glucose level, haemoglobin level, severity of TBI, pupillary reaction, and type of injury were identified as potential predictors of long-term outcomes.
Effects of medication adherence interventions for older adults with chronic illnesses: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Hae Ok Jeon, Myung-Ock Chae, Ahrin Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2022;13(5):328-340.   Published online October 12, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2022.0168
  • 4,110 View
  • 189 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to understand the characteristics of medication adherence interventions for older adults with chronic illnesses, and to investigate the average effect size by combining the individual effects of these interventions. Data from studies meeting the inclusion criteria were systematically collected in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis guidelines. The results showed that the average effect size (Hedges’ g) of the finally selected medication adherence interventions for older adults with chronic illnesses calculated using a random-effects model was 0.500 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.342−0.659). Of the medication adherence interventions, an implementation intention intervention (using face-to-face meetings and telephone monitoring with personalized behavioral strategies) and a health belief model–based educational program were found to be highly effective. Face-to-face counseling was a significantly effective method of implementing medication adherence interventions for older adults with chronic illnesses (Hedges’ g=0.531, 95% CI, 0.186−0.877), while medication adherence interventions through education and telehealth counseling were not effective. This study verified the effectiveness of personalized behavioral change strategies and cognitive behavioral therapy based on the health belief model, as well as face-to-face meetings, as medication adherence interventions for older adults with chronic illnesses.
Worldwide prevalence of fungal coinfections among COVID-19 patients: a comprehensive systematic review and meta-analysis
Saber Soltani, Milad Zandi, Samireh Faramarzi, Ramin Shahbahrami, Mohebat Vali, Sara Akhavan Rezayat, Reza Pakzad, Pooneh Malekifar, Iraj Pakzad, Neda Jahandoost, Jalal Moludi
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2022;13(1):15-23.   Published online February 8, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0293
  • 7,841 View
  • 125 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Microbial coinfections can increase the morbidity and mortality rates of viral respiratory diseases. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the pooled prevalence of fungal coinfections in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients. Web of Science, Medline, Scopus, and Embase were searched without language restrictions to identify the related research on COVID-19 patients with fungal coinfections from December 1, 2019, to December 30, 2020. A random-effects model was used for analysis. The sample size included 2,246 patients from 8 studies. The pooled prevalence of fungal coinfections was 12.60%. The frequency of fungal subtype coinfections was 3.71% for Aspergillus, 2.39% for Candida, and 0.39% for other. The World Health Organization’s Regional Office for Europe and Regional Office for Southeast Asia had the highest (23.28%) and lowest (4.53%) estimated prevalence of fungal coinfection, respectively. Our findings showed a high prevalence of fungal coinfections in COVID-19 cases, which is a likely contributor to mortality in COVID-19 patients. Early identification of fungal pathogens in the laboratory for COVID-19 patients can lead to timely treatment and prevention of further damage by this hidden infection.
COVID-19 Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Laboratory Findings, Comorbidities, and Clinical Outcomes Comparing Medical Staff versus the General Population
Mina Ebrahimi, Amal Saki Malehi, Fakher Rahim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2020;11(5):269-279.   Published online October 22, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2020.11.5.02
  • 8,851 View
  • 134 Download
  • 11 Web of Science
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material

This review compared coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) laboratory findings, comorbidities, and clinical outcomes in patients from the general population versus medical staff to aid diagnosis of COVID-19 in a more timely, efficient, and accurate way. Electronic databases were searched up to 23rd March, 2020. The initial search yielded 6,527 studies. Following screening, 24 studies were included [18 studies (11,564 cases) of confirmed COVID-19 cases in the general public, and 6 studies (394 cases) in medical staff] in this review. Significant differences were observed in white blood cell counts (p < 0.001), lymphocyte counts (p < 0.001), platelet counts (p = 0.04), procalcitonin levels (p < 0.001), lactate dehydrogenase levels (p < 0.001), and creatinine levels (p = 0.03) when comparing infected medical staff with the general public. The mortality rate was higher in the general population than in medical staff (8% versus 2%). This review showed that during the early stages of COVID-19, laboratory findings alone may not be significant predictors of infection and may just accompany increasing C-reactive protein levels, erythrocyte sedimentation rates, and lactate dehydrogenase levels. In the symptomatic stage, the lymphocyte and platelet counts tended to decrease. Elevated D-dimer fibrin degradation product was associated with poor prognosis.

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  • microRNA-185 Inhibits SARS-CoV-2 Infection through the Modulation of the Host’s Lipid Microenvironment
    Nadine Ahmed, Magen E. Francis, Noreen Ahmed, Alyson A. Kelvin, John Paul Pezacki
    Viruses.2023; 15(9): 1921.     CrossRef
  • Protective action of natural and induced immunization against the occurrence of delta or alpha variants of SARS-CoV-2 infection: a test-negative case-control study
    Giovanni Corrao, Matteo Franchi, Federico Rea, Danilo Cereda, Antonio Barone, Catia Rosanna Borriello, Petra Giulia Della Valle, Michele Ercolanoni, Ida Fortino, Jose Jara, Olivia Leoni, Francesco Mazziotta, Elisabetta Pierini, Giuseppe Preziosi, Marcello
    BMC Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Balancing Benefits and Harms of COVID-19 Vaccines: Lessons from the Ongoing Mass Vaccination Campaign in Lombardy, Italy
    Giovanni Corrao, Federico Rea, Matteo Franchi, Danilo Cereda, Antonio Barone, Catia Rosanna Borriello, Giulia Petra Della Valle, Michele Ercolanoni, Jose Jara, Giuseppe Preziosi, Manuel Maffeo, Francesco Mazziotta, Elisabetta Pierini, Francesco Lecis, Pie
    Vaccines.2022; 10(4): 623.     CrossRef
  • Vulnerability Predictors of Post-Vaccine SARS-CoV-2 Infection and Disease—Empirical Evidence from a Large Population-Based Italian Platform
    Giovanni Corrao, Matteo Franchi, Danilo Cereda, Francesco Bortolan, Olivia Leoni, Catia Rosanna Borriello, Petra Giulia Della Valle, Marcello Tirani, Giovanni Pavesi, Antonio Barone, Michele Ercolanoni, Jose Jara, Massimo Galli, Guido Bertolaso
    Vaccines.2022; 10(6): 845.     CrossRef
  • Factors associated with severe or fatal clinical manifestations of SARS‐CoV‐2 infection after receiving the third dose of vaccine
    Giovanni Corrao, Matteo Franchi, Danilo Cereda, Francesco Bortolan, Olivia Leoni, Jose Jara, Giuseppina Valenti, Giovanni Pavesi
    Journal of Internal Medicine.2022; 292(5): 829.     CrossRef
  • Role of multiresolution vulnerability indices in COVID-19 spread in India: a Bayesian model-based analysis
    Rupam Bhattacharyya, Anik Burman, Kalpana Singh, Sayantan Banerjee, Subha Maity, Arnab Auddy, Sarit Kumar Rout, Supriya Lahoti, Rajmohan Panda, Veerabhadran Baladandayuthapani
    BMJ Open.2022; 12(11): e056292.     CrossRef
  • A novel multi-omics-based highly accurate prediction of symptoms, comorbid conditions, and possible long-term complications of COVID-19
    Debmalya Barh, Sandeep Tiwari, Bruno Silva Andrade, Marianna E. Weener, Aristóteles Góes-Neto, Vasco Azevedo, Preetam Ghosh, Kenneth Blum, Nirmal Kumar Ganguly
    Molecular Omics.2021; 17(2): 317.     CrossRef
  • Clinical and laboratory factors associated with coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid‐19): A systematic review and meta‐analysis
    Le Huu Nhat Minh, Ali Ahmed‐Fouad Abozaid, Nam Xuan Ha, Loc Le Quang, Abdelrahman Gamil Gad, Ranjit Tiwari, Tran Nhat‐Le, Dinh Kim Quyen, Balqees AL‐Manaseer, Nguyen Dang Kien, Nguyen Lam Vuong, Ahmad Helmy Zayan, Le Huu Hanh Nhi, Kadek Agus Surya Dila, J
    Reviews in Medical Virology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Epidemiologic and Clinic Characteristics of the First Wave of the COVID-19 Pandemic in Hospitalized Patients from Galați County
    Mihaela-Camelia Vasile, Anca-Adriana Arbune, Gabriela Lupasteanu, Constantin-Marinel Vlase, George-Cosmin Popovici, Manuela Arbune
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2021; 10(18): 4210.     CrossRef
  • Human Amniotic Fluid for the Treatment of Hospitalized, Symptomatic, and Laboratory-verified SARS-CoV-2 Patients
    Mojgan Barati, Fakher Rahim
    The Open Biology Journal.2021; 9(1): 36.     CrossRef
  • Stratification of the risk of developing severe or lethal Covid-19 using a new score from a large Italian population: a population-based cohort study
    Giovanni Corrao, Federico Rea, Flavia Carle, Salvatore Scondotto, Alessandra Allotta, Vito Lepore, Antonio D'Ettorre, Cinzia Tanzarella, Patrizia Vittori, Sabrina Abena, Marica Iommi, Liana Spazzafumo, Michele Ercolanoni, Roberto Blaco, Simona Carbone, Cr
    BMJ Open.2021; 11(11): e053281.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Meta-Analysis of the Effects of Physical Modality Therapy and Exercise Therapy on Neck and Shoulder Myofascial Pain Syndrome
Chan-Myeong Kim, Ji-Won Park
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2020;11(4):251-258.   Published online August 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2020.11.4.15
  • 6,875 View
  • 152 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The main purpose of this study was to identify the effects of physical therapy modalities and exercise therapy on myofascial pain syndrome by assessing the degree of effect size (ES) and related variables.

Methods

Related studies published between 1st January 2008 and 31st December 2019were retrieved from national [KCI, RISS, National Assembly Library and DBpia (n = 405)] and international [PubMed, Embase, Google Scholar and Cochrane library (n = 1,600)] databases. According to the selection criteria, 25 studies were selected for review.

Results

The degree of ES in the physical therapy and exercise therapy combined group (1.83) showed the largest mean ES. The size of the effect according to the number of people to be treated was 41 or more (1.64), and showed the largest mean ES. The size of the effect according to treatment period was 16 to 30 days (1.41). The size of the effect for 6 to 10 treatments (1.51) showed the largest mean ES. Trim and fill results showed that the calibration ES was 0.67.

Conclusion

Physical therapy modalities and exercise therapy had a great effect on myofascial pain syndrome in the neck and shoulders, and the effect differed according to the methods of intervention, and the methods of evaluation.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Impact of Dry Needling With Electrical Stimulation on Pain and Disability in Patients With Musculoskeletal Shoulder Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials
    Anthony N Baumann, Andrew Fiorentino, Caleb J Oleson, John Martin Leland
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Meta-Analysis of the Effects of Various Physical Therapy Method about Shoulder Adhesive Capsulitis: The Cases of Domestic Research
    Chan Myeong Kim
    The Journal of Korean Physical Therapy.2020; 32(5): 277.     CrossRef
Therapeutic Intervention for Visuo-Spatial Neglect after Stroke: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials
Jae-Sung Kwon
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2018;9(2):59-65.   Published online April 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2018.9.2.04
  • 6,410 View
  • 76 Download
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The aims of this meta-analysis were to examine intervention methods of qualitatively, well-designed studies from the past 10 years for treating visuo-spatial neglect (VSN) in patients who had suffered a stroke, and to evaluate the combined effects of intervention.

Methods

Studies published between 2008 and 2017 on the theme of VSN were collected from PubMed, CINAHL, and MEDLINE, representative academic databases and search engines. The PEDro scale was used for evaluating the quality of methodology. The sample size, mean, and standard deviation of identified studies were used for meta-analysis.

Results

Eight studies were selected for analysis. The PEDro scores of the selected studies were ≥ 7, with 237 subjects analyzed. The results of intervention were classified into “mental function” and “activity and participation” based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. The analyzed effect sizes for combined outcomes, mental function and, activity and participation, were 0.728 (medium effect size), 0.850 (large effect size), and 0.536 (medium effect size), respectively.

Conclusion

Intervention methods for treating VSN had a short-term effect on cognitive function (visual perception). In particular, non-invasive brain stimulation therapy showed a large effect size for VSN treatment.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Non-pharmacological interventions for spatial neglect or inattention following stroke and other non-progressive brain injury
    Verity Longley, Christine Hazelton, Calvin Heal, Alex Pollock, Kate Woodward-Nutt, Claire Mitchell, Gorana Pobric, Andy Vail, Audrey Bowen
    Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Neural Mechanisms of Spatial Attention Deficits in Trauma
    Stefanie R. Russman Block, Daniel H. Weissman, Chandra Sripada, Mike Angstadt, Elizabeth R. Duval, Anthony P. King, Israel Liberzon
    Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and .2020; 5(10): 991.     CrossRef
  • Updated Approach to Stroke Rehabilitation
    Leroy R. Lindsay, Diane A. Thompson, Michael W. O’Dell
    Medical Clinics of North America.2020; 104(2): 199.     CrossRef
  • Implementing a Rehabilitation Protocol for Spatial Neglect Assessment and Treatment in an Acute Care Hospital
    Kimberly Hreha, Peii Chen, Jennifer LaRosa, Christopher Santos, Cindy Gocon, A.M. Barrett
    Journal of Acute Care Physical Therapy.2020; 11(2): 59.     CrossRef
  • Alertness Training Improves Spatial Bias and Functional Ability in Spatial Neglect
    Thomas Van Vleet, Paolo Bonato, Eric Fabara, Sawsan Dabit, Sarah‐Jane Kim, Christopher Chiu, Antonio Luigi Bisogno, Michael Merzenich, Maurizio Corbetta, Joseph DeGutis
    Annals of Neurology.2020; 88(4): 747.     CrossRef
Estimating Tuberculin Skin Test Reactions among Children and Teenagers Who Received the Bacillus Calmette-Guerin Vaccination at Birth: A Meta-analysis
Mohammad Sadegh Rezai, Siavosh Abedi, Mahdi Afshari, Mahmood Moosazadeh
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2017;8(1):3-10.   Published online February 28, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2017.8.1.02
  • 4,451 View
  • 32 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Tuberculin skin reaction size is one indicator of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine efficacy and a way to diagnose latent infection. Several primary studies have examined this issue. Combining the results of these studies using a meta-analysis will provide reliable evidence regarding this indicator for policymakers. This study aimed to estimate the total frequency of different tuberculin skin test reactions among Iranian children and teenagers who received the BCG vaccination at birth.

Methods

National and international databanks were searched using relevant keywords. After the search strategy was restricted and duplicates were excluded, the titles and abstracts of the remaining papers were screened. All included studies included healthy children who received the BCG vaccine without confirmed tuberculosis exposure. Heterogeneity of the results was assessed using the Cochrane test and I2 index showed the random effects model as the best model for estimating the pooled results.

Results

We combined the results of 14 primary studies including purified protein derivative reaction test measures of 26,281 Iranian children. The frequencies (95% confidence intervals) of the reactions were 8.5% (6.2–10.8) for patients with a reaction size ≥ 10 mm, 29.9% (22.3–37.4) for a reaction size of 5–9 mm, and 60% (48.9–71.1) for a reaction size < 5 mm.

Conclusion

Our study showed that large numbers of Iranian children and teens have no positive BCG vaccine reaction and a considerable number of children have been exposed to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

Citations

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  • Comparison of Serum Immunoglobulin Levels and Lymphocyte Counts in Children with Lymphadenitis Following BCG Vaccination
    Leila Barati, Arash Kalantari, Jalaladdin Sheikh, Fateme-Sadat Tabatabaee, Farshid Kompani, Maryam Najafinejad, Ahmad Sohrabi, Fatemeh Cheraghali
    Iranian Journal of Pediatrics.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Is latent tuberculosis infection challenging in Iranian health care workers? A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Mohammad Hossein YektaKooshali, Farahnaz Movahedzadeh, Ali Alavi Foumani, Hoda Sabati, Alireza Jafari, HASNAIN SEYED EHTESHAM
    PLOS ONE.2019; 14(10): e0223335.     CrossRef
Epidemiological and Clinical Features of People with Malta Fever in Iran: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Mahmood Moosazadeh, Roja Nikaeen, Ghasem Abedi, Motahareh Kheradmand, Saeid Safiri
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2016;7(3):157-167.   Published online June 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2016.04.009
  • 3,697 View
  • 24 Download
  • 18 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Numerous studies have reported the epidemiological and clinical features of Malta fever incidence in Iran. Review and synthesis of the related literature through meta-analysis can provide an appropriate measurement for aforementioned indices. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine the epidemiological and clinical features of people with Malta fever in Iran.
Methods
The required documents were obtained through searching national and international databases. In each study, standard deviation of the indices was calculated using binomial distribution formulas. Finally, the heterogeneity index was determined between studies using Cochran (Q) and I2 tests.
Results
Combining the results of 47 articles in the meta-analysis indicated that 57.6% (55.02–60.1%) and 42.3% (49.8–44.9%) of the patients were male and female, respectively. Most of the patients lived in rural areas; 68.4% (63.6–73.2%) compared to 31.4% (26.7–36.3%). In addition, 20.8% (17.4–24.2%) of the patients were ranchers and farmers, 16.9% (14.5–19.4%) were students, and 31.6% (27–36.2%) were housewives. Of the patients studies, 50.5% (35.6–65.2%) experienced contact with animals and 57.1% (46.4–67.9%) used unpasteurized dairy products. Fever, joint pain, and sweating were detected among 65.7% (53.7–77.8%) and 55.3% (44.4–66.2%), respectively.
Conclusion
The present study revealed that the frequency of male patients with brucellosis was considerably more than that of female patients. The number of patients with Malta fever in rural areas was significantly more than in urban areas. High-risk behavior, unprotected contact with animals, and using unpasteurized dairy products were among the most significant factors affecting Malta fever incidence in Iran. Fever, joint pain, and sweating were detected among most of the patients with Malta fever.

Citations

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  • A study of rural populations’ knowledge, attitude, and practice about brucellosis: a descriptive, cross-sectional, multicenter study
    Zahra Montaseri, Zahra Mohebi, Rahil Masoumi, Azizallah Dehghan, Mostafa Bijani
    BMC Research Notes.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Brucellosis infection complicated with myelitis: a case report and literature review
    Xiaoyu Ma, Ying Wang, Qiong Wu, Xiaomei Ma, Qiang Wang, Qinghong Guo
    Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Diagnostic significance of hematological parameters in brucellosis
    Mehmet Çelik, Mehmet Reşat Ceylan, Deniz Altındağ, Nevin Güler Dinçer, Sevil Alkan
    Journal of Clinical Medicine of Kazakhstan.2023; 20(1): 50.     CrossRef
  • Presence of Brucella spp. in Milk and Dairy Products: A Comprehensive Review and Its Perspectives
    Md. Sadequl Islam, Md. Ariful Islam, Md. Moshiur Rahman, Khaleda Islam, Md. Mominul Islam, Md. Murtuza Kamal, Md. Nazrul Islam, Gianfranco Picone
    Journal of Food Quality.2023; 2023: 1.     CrossRef
  • Predicting of Bacteremia in Patients with Brucellosis Using Machine Learning Methods
    Mehmet ÇELİK, Mehmet Reşat CEYLAN, Deniz ALTINDAĞ, Sait Can YÜCEBAŞ, Nevin GÜLER DİNCER, Sevil ALKAN
    Journal of Contemporary Medicine.2023; 13(3): 459.     CrossRef
  • Toponyms in dermatology
    Heera Ramesh, Sachin Somashekar
    Indian Journal of Dermatology.2022; 67(3): 279.     CrossRef
  • Brucella pleurisy: An extremely rare complication of brucellosis
    Ahmad Alikhani, Hamideh Abbaspour Kasgari, Haadi Majidi, Zahra Nekoukar
    Clinical Case Reports.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Design and validation of brucellosis prevention questionnaire focused on animal vaccination
    Farhad Bahadori, Fazlollah Ghofranipour, Saeideh Ghaffarifar, Reza Ziaei
    BMC Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Forecasting the monthly incidence rate of brucellosis in west of Iran using time series and data mining from 2010 to 2019
    Hadi Bagheri, Leili Tapak, Manoochehr Karami, Zahra Hosseinkhani, Hamidreza Najari, Safdar Karimi, Zahra Cheraghi, Esteban Tlelo-Cuautle
    PLOS ONE.2020; 15(5): e0232910.     CrossRef
  • Epidemiologically characteristics of human brucellosis and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of Brucella melitensis in Hinggan League of the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China
    Hai-Tao Yuan, Cheng-Ling Wang, Li-Na Liu, Dan Wang, Dan Li, Zhen-Jun Li, Zhi-Guo Liu
    Infectious Diseases of Poverty.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Brucellosis: Evaluation of Two Hundred and Ten Cases with Different Clinical Features
    Esma Eroglu, Bahar Kandemir
    Annals of the Academy of Medicine, Singapore.2020; 49(7): 462.     CrossRef
  • A comparison of three data mining time series models in prediction of monthly brucellosis surveillance data
    Nasrin Shirmohammadi‐Khorram, Leili Tapak, Omid Hamidi, Zohreh Maryanaji
    Zoonoses and Public Health.2019; 66(7): 759.     CrossRef
  • Human brucellosis caused by raw dairy products: A review on the occurrence, major risk factors and prevention
    Maryam Dadar, Youcef Shahali, Adrian M. Whatmore
    International Journal of Food Microbiology.2019; 292: 39.     CrossRef
  • Epidemiological, Clinical and Paraclinical Evaluation of Recorded Cases with Brucellosis in Kermanshah Province Health Center 2012 - 2016
    Hossein Hatami, Ali Ramezankhani, Farahnaz Shekarchi
    Journal of Kermanshah University of Medical Scienc.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Epidemiological, risk factors, clinical, and laboratory features of brucellosis in the Southwest of Iran within 2009–2015
    Mahmood Nabavi, Hossein Hatami, Hedayatollah Jamaliarand
    International Journal of Preventive Medicine.2019; 10(1): 108.     CrossRef
  • Meta-Analysis of the Changes of Peripheral Blood T Cell Subsets in Patients with Brucellosis
    Rongjiong Zheng, Songsong Xie, Shaniya Niyazi, Xiaobo Lu, Lihua Sun, Yan Zhou, Yuexin Zhang, Kai Wang
    Journal of Immunology Research.2018; 2018: 1.     CrossRef
  • A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Epidemiology and Clinical Manifestations of Human Brucellosis in China
    Rongjiong Zheng, Songsong Xie, Xiaobo Lu, Lihua Sun, Yan Zhou, Yuexin Zhang, Kai Wang
    BioMed Research International.2018; 2018: 1.     CrossRef
  • The clinical features of 590 patients with brucellosis in Xinjiang, China with the emphasis on the treatment of complications
    Bin Jia, Fengbo Zhang, Ying Lu, Wenbao Zhang, Jun Li, Yuexin Zhang, Jianbing Ding, Mazin Barry
    PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.2017; 11(5): e0005577.     CrossRef
Exposure to Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and the Risk of Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
Jae-Hong Park, Eun Shil Cha, Yousun Ko, Myung-Sil Hwang, Jin-Hwan Hong, Won Jin Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(2):77-84.   Published online April 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.02.001
  • 3,651 View
  • 28 Download
  • 25 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study extended and updated a meta-analysis of the association between exposure to dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and the risk of breast cancer.
Methods
We reviewed the published literature on exposure to DDE and breast cancer risk to update a meta-analysis from 2004. The total of 35 studies included 16 hospital-based case–control studies, 11 population-based case–control studies, and 10 nested case–control studies identified through keyword searches in the PubMed and EMBASE databases.
Results
The summary odds ratio (OR) for the identified studies was 1.03 (95% confidence interval 0.95–1.12) and the overall heterogeneity in the OR was observed (I2 = 40.9; p = 0.006). Subgroup meta-analyses indicated no significant association between exposure to DDE and breast cancer risk by the type of design, study years, biological specimen, and geographical region of the study, except from population-based case–control studies with estimated DDE levels in serum published in 1990s.
Conclusion
Existing studies do not support the view that DDE increases the risk of breast cancer in humans. However, further studies incorporating more detailed information on DDT exposure and other potential risk factors for breast cancer are needed.

Citations

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  • Causes and Risk Factors of Breast Cancer, What Do We Know for Sure? An Evidence Synthesis of Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses
    Borghild Løyland, Ida Hellum Sandbekken, Ellen Karine Grov, Inger Utne
    Cancers.2024; 16(8): 1583.     CrossRef
  • Breast cancer immunophenotypes and serum organochlorine pesticides in Mexican women: Mixture exposure approach
    Rodrigo Ugalde-Resano, Ángel Mérida-Ortega, Mariano E. Cebrián, Lizbeth López-Carrillo
    Environmental Pollution.2024; 358: 124495.     CrossRef
  • Validation and green profile assessment of a binary solvent liquid phase microextraction method for the determination of chlorbenside and fenobucarb in lake and wastewater samples by GC–MS
    Dotse Selali Chormey
    Environmental Science and Pollution Research.2023; 30(15): 44697.     CrossRef
  • Putative interactions between transthyretin and endosulfan II and its relevance in breast cancer
    Saurabh Sharma, Lakshay Malhotra, Paromita Mukherjee, Navneet Kaur, Thammineni Krishanlata, Chittur V. Srikanth, Vandana Mishra, Basu Dev Banerjee, Abdul Samath Ethayathulla, Radhey Shyam Sharma
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PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives