Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
6 "gender"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Brief Report
Gender differences in hepatitis A seropositivity rates according to the Republic of Korea’s vaccination policy
Hyunjin Son, Sunhyun Ahn, Wonseo Park, Gayoung Chun, Unyeong Go, Sang Gon Lee, Eun Hee Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2024;15(2):168-173.   Published online April 16, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2023.0263
  • 836 View
  • 26 Download
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study aimed to investigate differences in the anti-hepatitis A virus (HAV) antibody seropositivity rate by age and gender. Methods: We collected information on anti-HAV immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin M status from samples submitted for HAV antibody testing in 2012–2022. A total of 1,333,615 cases were included in the analysis. Results: By age, the seropositivity rate was represented by a U-shaped curve, such that the rate was low for the group aged 20 to 39 years and higher in those who were younger or older. Over time, the curve shifted rightward, and the seropositivity rate declined gradually in the group aged 35 to 39 years and older. A gender-based difference in antibody seropositivity rate was especially noticeable in the group aged 20 to 29 years. This difference between genders widened in the participants’ early 20s—when men in the Republic of Korea enlist in the military—and the divergence continued subsequently for older individuals. Conclusion: These results indicate a higher risk of severe infection among older individuals and a gender-based difference in seroprevalence. Therefore, it is necessary to implement policies to promote vaccination in adults.
Original Articles
Gender Difference in the Association Between E-Cigarette Use and Depression among US Adults
Baksun Sung
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(1):13-19.   Published online February 23, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.12.1.03
  • 9,022 View
  • 146 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The objective of this study was to determine the association between e-cigarette use and depression and examine how this association is different by gender among US adults.

Methods

Data from the 2017 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and Selected Metropolitan/Micropolitan Area Risk Trends was used, and included 174,351 of 230,875 US adults aged 18 years and older. Data were analyzed using the multivariate logistic regression models.

Results

After adjusting for age, race, education, income, marital status, employment status, smoking status, and physical activity, firstly, “current daily e-cigarette users” (AOR = 2.487, p < 0.001), “current non-daily e-cigarette users” (AOR = 1.623, p < 0.001), and “former e-cigarette users” (AOR = 1.573, p < 0.001) were associated with increased odds of depression compared with “never e-cigarette users.” Secondly, women were associated with increased odds of depression compared with men (AOR = 1.797, p < 0.001). Finally, male “current daily e-cigarette users” (AOR = 1.366, p < 0.01) were associated with increased odds of depression compared with female “never e-cigarette users.”

Conclusion

Thus, even though women tend to be more vulnerable to depression compared with men, e-cigarette use was positively associated with depression among both men and women.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Association between e-cigarette use behaviors and perceived harmfulness of e-cigarettes and anxiety/depression symptoms among Black/African American Adults
    David Adzrago, Kayo Fujimoto, Melissa B. Harrell, Antwan Jones, J. Michael Wilkerson
    Preventive Medicine Reports.2023; 31: 102080.     CrossRef
  • Association between E-Cigarette Use Behaviors and Anxiety/Depression among Black/African American Adults Based on Sexual Identity
    David Adzrago, Melissa B. Harrell, Kayo Fujimoto, Antwan Jones, J. Michael Wilkerson
    International Journal of Environmental Research an.2023; 20(3): 2078.     CrossRef
  • The Association Between Nicotine Dependence and Mental Health in the General Population of Saudi Arabia: A Cross-Sectional Analytical Study
    Danah Abdullah Albarrak, Abdulrahman Bandar Alotaibi, Roaa Faisal Alotaibi, Sara Hussain Alramadhan, Alhanouf Ibrahim Bin Muhanna, Abdulrahman Mohammed Aldehan, Khalid A Bin Abdulrahman
    International Journal of General Medicine.2023; Volume 16: 5801.     CrossRef
  • Use of electronic vaping products and mental health among adolescent high school students in the United States: The moderating effect of sex
    Philip Baiden, Hannah S. Szlyk, Patricia Cavazos-Rehg, Henry K. Onyeaka, JaNiene E. Peoples, Erin Kasson
    Journal of Psychiatric Research.2022; 147: 24.     CrossRef
Gender Differences in Harmful Use of Alcohol Among Korean Adults
Eunok Park, Yeon Sook Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2019;10(4):205-214.   Published online August 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2019.10.4.02
  • 6,076 View
  • 66 Download
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Harmful alcohol consumption is associated with considerable social and economic damage to individuals and society. Because gender and ethnic background influence alcohol intake differently, examining gender specific factors influencing harmful drinking is necessary. This study investigated gender differences in alcohol consumption, harmful drinking, and the associated factors among Korean adults.

Methods

We analyzed the data from the 2012–2015 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Data from survey participants aged 20–64 years (N = 18,581) were included. The Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test was used for alcohol dependence, and pooled weights were used. Chi-squared tests and multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted.

Results

The prevalence of harmful alcohol use (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test score ≥ 16) was 10.7% in the total sample; 18.4% in men and 3.4% in women, which constituted a significant difference. Education, marital status, smoking, perceived stress, and depressive feeling were associated with harmful drinking in both genders. However, household income, occupation, and perceived health status were associated with harmful drinking only in men.

Conclusion

Since there are gender differences in harmful drinking and alcohol dependence, gender tailored prevention and intervention strategies for alcohol dependence are necessary including consideration of smoking, stress, and depressive feeling.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Sex differences in the association between social jetlag and hazardous alcohol consumption in Korean workers: A nationwide cross-sectional study
    Seong-Uk Baek, Jong-Uk Won, Yu-Min Lee, Jin-Ha Yoon
    Sleep Medicine.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Characteristics and Clinical Course of Diabetes of the Exocrine Pancreas: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study
    Nami Lee, So Jeong Park, Dongwoo Kang, Ja Young Jeon, Hae Jin Kim, Dae Jung Kim, Kwan-Woo Lee, Edward J. Boyko, Seung Jin Han
    Diabetes Care.2022; 45(5): 1141.     CrossRef
  • Harmful alcohol use among mothers of under-five child: findings from the Panel Study on Korean Children
    Seulgi Kim, Seung-Ah Choe, Sung-Il Cho
    BMC Women's Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Characteristics and Clinical Course of Diabetes of the Exocrine Pancreas: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Studybrief Title: Diabetes of the Exocrine Pancreas
    Nami Lee, So Jeong Park, Dongwoo Kang, Ja Young Jeon, Hae Jin Kim, Dae Jung Kim, Kwan-Woo Lee, Edward J. Boyko, Seung Jin Han
    SSRN Electronic Journal .2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Associations between Harmful Experiences from Alcohol Use of Others and Mental Health in Korean Adolescents
    Mi Ah Han
    International Journal of Environmental Research an.2019; 16(21): 4240.     CrossRef
Gender-Specific Relationship Between Executive Function and Self-Rated Health
Mi Sook Jung, Kyoung Suk Lee, Mijung Kim, Hyeri Yun
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2019;10(2):93-101.   Published online April 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2019.10.2.08
  • 7,668 View
  • 48 Download
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Self-rated health is a comprehensive measure of health. As gender difference in self-rated health is found, identifying gender-specific factors related to self-rated health is important. Poor executive functioning negatively affects an individual’s independence and healthy lifestyle, but it is unknown relationships between executive function and self-rated health and gender differences in these relationships. Therefore, gender differences were examined in the relationship between executive function and self-rated health in the community.

Methods

Individuals completed questionnaires about their health status and subjective decline in executive function. Neuropsychological tests were also performed to assess objective executive functioning. Two separate multivariable linear regression analyses were conducted by gender.

Results

Better objective executive function was related to greater self-rated health scores (better self-rated health) in men alone (βs = 0.341), while better subjective executive function was significantly associated with greater self-rated health scores in both men and women (βs = 0.385 and 0.443, respectively).

Conclusion

Gender differences are important when reporting perceived health status, in particular the different effects of subjective and objective executive function on self-rated health across genders. Clinicians need to be aware of the potential value of subjective executive function complaints when evaluating health status.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Self-rated flexibility significantly reflects the hip flexibility, but not the ankle flexibility
    Wootaek Lim
    Isokinetics and Exercise Science.2024; 32(2): 171.     CrossRef
  • The Scale Assessment of Executive Functions-Adult (SAEF-A): Construction of a valid ecological instrument
    Farah El houari, Ibtissam El Harch, Abdelkrim Janati Idrissi, Samira El fakir, Benaissa Zarhbouch, Zouhayr Souirti
    Applied Neuropsychology: Adult.2024; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Educational Attainment and Perceived Need for Future ADL Assistance
    Julia M. Finan, Scott D. Landes
    Journal of Applied Gerontology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The impact of epidemic infectious diseases on the relationship between subjective well-being and social class identity in older adults: The mediating role of Self-rated health
    Qianxi Feng, Yan Li, Miao Wan, Wei Li, Roghieh Nooripour
    PLOS ONE.2024; 19(3): e0301289.     CrossRef
  • Psychometric properties of the Teenage Executive Functioning Inventory (TEXI): A confirmatory factor analysis and measurement invariance by gender in Bangladeshi adolescents
    Bijon Baroi, Samsad Afrin Himi
    Applied Neuropsychology: Child.2024; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Current state, equality level and trends of self-rated health among old adults with intact physical condition
    Weicun Ren, Clifford Silver Tarimo, Zhang Liang
    BMC Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Gender features of awareness and attitude towards a healthy lifestyle among users of medical Internet resources
    A.N. Korobeynikova, M.V. Bezzubtseva, A.E. Demkina, A.D. Yuldasheva, S.V. Popova, A.L. Pivenshtein, A.V. Isaeva, V.G. Starosvetskaya, Z.G. Akaeva, E.L. Kolesnik
    Profilakticheskaya meditsina.2023; 26(10): 62.     CrossRef
  • Validation of a proxy‐reported SARC‐F questionnaire for current and retrospective screening of sarcopenia‐related functional impairments
    Johannes Maurus, Tobias Terzer, Axel Benner, Sabine Goisser, Annette Eidam, Anja Roth, Maike Janssen, Sonia Jaramillo, Hannes Martin Lorenz, William Micol, Klaus Hauer, Carsten Müller‐Tidow, Jürgen M. Bauer, Karin Jordan, Nina Rosa Neuendorff
    Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle.2022; 13(1): 264.     CrossRef
  • Association between Hippocampal Volume and Working Memory in 10,000+ 9–10-Year-Old Children: Sex Differences
    Shervin Assari, Shanika Boyce, Tanja Jovanovic
    Children.2021; 8(5): 411.     CrossRef
  • Social Capital and Self-Rated Health: Empirical Evidence from China
    Jiafeng Gu, Ruiyu Zhu
    International Journal of Environmental Research an.2020; 17(23): 9108.     CrossRef
  • Effect of self-rated health status on functioning difficulties among older adults in Ghana: Coarsened exact matching method of analysis of the World Health Organization’s study on global AGEing and adult health, Wave 2
    John Tetteh, Robert Kogi, Anita Ohenewa Yawson, George Mensah, Richard Biritwum, Alfred Edwin Yawson, Heidi H. Ewen
    PLOS ONE.2019; 14(11): e0224327.     CrossRef
Do Factors Associated Self-rated Good Health and Their Influences Differ between Males and Females across Different Age Groups in Korean and Australia?
Hyo Young Lee, Stephanie Doris Short
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2017;8(1):11-25.   Published online February 28, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2017.8.1.03
  • 4,370 View
  • 22 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This was a comparative study between Australia and Korea that investigated whether and to what extent factors related to self-rated good health (SRGH) differ by gender among age groups.

Methods

This study was a secondary analysis of data that were collected in nationally representative, cross-sectional, and population-based surveys. We analyzed Australian and Korean participants > 20 years of age using 2011 data from the Australian National Nutritional Physical Activity Survey (n = 9,276) and the Korean National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (n = 5,915). Analyses were based on multiple logistic regression after controlling for covariates.

Results

Factors associated with SRGH and the extent of their influence differed by gender among age groups within each nation. Australian SRGH was associated with more factors than Korean SRGH, except in participants > 65 years old. Many differences among adults aged 20–44 years were observed, particularly with regard to the influence of socioeconomic factors. Living with a spouse only influenced SRGH in men 20–44 years old in both countries, negatively for Korean men and positively for Australian men. In this same age group, SRGH was positively influenced by employment and attainment of a higher education level in Australian men but not among Korean men; among women, income, but not education, affected SRGH in Korea, whereas in Australia, women were more influenced by education than by income. Lack of chronic disease had a strong influence on SRGH in both countries and was influential in all Australians and Koreans except those ≥ 65 years old.

Conclusion

Broad features of society should be considered when discussing health and differences in associated factors and their influences. For focused public health interventions of population groups, it is also necessary to consider gender and age groups within social environments.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Factors and age-related drivers that influence self-rated bad health in police officers: A cross-sectional study
    Hyo Young Lee, Hyuk Im, Kyu-Min Kim
    Preventive Medicine Reports.2024; 42: 102748.     CrossRef
  • The effects of medication adherence and health literacy on health‐related quality of life in older people with hypertension
    Nam Hee Park, Mi Sook Song, So Young Shin, Ji‐hye Jeong, Hyo Young Lee
    International Journal of Older People Nursing.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
Gender-based Violence Among Pregnant Women of Syangja District, Nepal
Samjhana Gurung, Jeevan Acharya
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2016;7(2):101-107.   Published online April 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2015.11.010
  • 3,286 View
  • 21 Download
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study aims to determine prevalence of gender-based violence among pregnant women attending an antenatal care (ANC) clinic.
Methods
Between September 2014 and December 2014, a cross-sectional study was conducted among 202 pregnant women attending the antenatal ward of the Primary Healthcare Centre (PHC) of Syangja district, Nepal. The data were collected using semistructure questionnaires with face-to-face interviews. SPSS software (IBM Corp, Armonk, NY, USA) was used for analysis the data.
Results
The prevalence rate of gender-based violence was found to be 91.1% (184). Most of the respondents (87%) faced economic violence followed by psychological (53.8%), sexual (41.8%), and physical (4.3%) violence. Women experienced: (1) psychological violence with most complaining of angry looks followed by jealousy or anger while talking with other men, insults using abusive language and neglect; (2) economic violence with most complaining of financial hardship, denial of basic needs and an insistence on knowing where respondents were and restricting them to parents' home or friends/relatives' houses (jealousy); (3) physical violence by slapping, pushing, shaking, or throwing something at her, twisting arm or pulling hair, and punching and kicking; and (4) sexual violence by physically forcing her to have sexual intercourse without consent, and hurting or causing injury to private parts. Most (100%) of the perpetrators were found to be husbands and mothers-in-law (10.7%) who violated them rarely.
Conclusion
The prevalence of gender-based violence (GBV) among pregnant women attending the ANC clinic was greater in the Syangja district of Nepal. Women's empowerment, economic autonomy, sensitization, informal or formal training regarding GBV for men and women, and the need for large-scale population-based surveys are the major recommendations of this study.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Prevalence of Violence in Iranian Pregnant Women: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    Shohreh Shafiei, Maryam Chegeni, Sima Afrashteh, Hamid Reza Shoraka, Azam Bazrafshan, Zohreh Bagherinezhad, Masumeh Ghazanfarpour, Hamid Sharifi
    Maternal and Child Health Journal.2022; 26(10): 1983.     CrossRef
  • Gendered consequences of social changes in Nepal: rich possibilities
    Radha Adhikari, Jeevan R Sharma
    European Bulletin of Himalayan Research.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Gebelikte aile içi şiddete maruz kalmanın postpartum depresyon ve maternal bağlanmaya etkisi
    Ayten TAŞPINAR, Seher SARIKAYA KARABUDAK, Ayden ÇOBAN, Filiz ADANA
    Adıyaman Üniversitesi Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi.2021; : 94.     CrossRef
  • Is there an association between fertility and domestic violence in Nepal?
    Sarah Raifman, Mahesh Puri, Jennet Arcara, Nadia Diamond-Smith
    AJOG Global Reports.2021; 1(2): 100011.     CrossRef
  • Intimate partner violence among pregnant women attending antenatal care services in the rural Gambia
    Joseph W. Jatta, Ararso Baru, Olufunmilayo I. Fawole, Oladosu A. Ojengbede, Yong-hui Dang
    PLOS ONE.2021; 16(8): e0255723.     CrossRef
  • Factors associated with contraceptive use in rural Nepal: Gender and decision-making
    Preeti K. Mahato, Zoë A. Sheppard, Edwin van Teijlingen, Nisa De Souza
    Sexual & Reproductive Healthcare.2020; 24: 100507.     CrossRef
  • Experiences and Perceptions of Abused Turkish Women Regarding Violence Against Women
    Emel Bahadir-Yilmaz, Fatma Oz
    Community Mental Health Journal.2019; 55(4): 686.     CrossRef
  • Intimate Partner Violence in Relation to Husband Characteristics and Women Empowerment: Evidence from Nepal
    Sujan Gautam, Hyoung-Sun Jeong
    International Journal of Environmental Research an.2019; 16(5): 709.     CrossRef
  • Criticality as Ideological Becoming: Developing English Teachers for Critical Pedagogy in Nepal
    Bal Krishna Sharma, Prem Phyak
    Critical Inquiry in Language Studies.2017; 14(2-3): 210.     CrossRef
  • In Bangla There Is No Word for Vagina <br>—Reflections on Language, Sexual Health, and Women’s Access to Healthcare in Resource-Limited Countries
    Annekathryn Goodman, Mithila Faruque, Rachel M. Clark
    Health.2016; 08(12): 1244.     CrossRef

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives