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Original Articles
Association between the empirical dietary inflammatory index and musculoskeletal pain in community-dwelling older adults: a cross-sectional study
Mahshid Rezaei, Zahra Tajary, Zahra Esmaeily, Atefeh Eyvazkhani, Shahrzad Daei, Marjan Mansouri Dara, Mohaddeseh Rezaei, Abolghassem Djazayeri, Ahmadreza Dorosty Motlagh
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2023;14(1):51-58.   Published online February 20, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2022.0194
  • 2,396 View
  • 77 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Inflammation has been proposed to be one of the main causes of musculoskeletal pain. Diet is a lifestyle factor that plays an important role in managing inflammation; thus, we assessed the inflammatory potential of diets using the empirical dietary inflammatory index (EDII) to investigate the relationship between diet and musculoskeletal pain.
Methods
This cross-sectional study included 212 elderly individuals who were selected from health centers in Tehran, Iran. Dietary intake was evaluated using a valid and reliable 147-item food frequency questionnaire. To measure the intensity of pain, a visual analogue scale was used. Multiple linear regression was applied to assess the association between the EDII and musculoskeletal pain.
Results
In total, 62.7% and 37.3% of participants had mild and severe pain, respectively. The EDII values were 0.97±0.72 and 1.10±0.66, respectively, in those with mild and severe pain. A higher EDII score was associated with more intense musculoskeletal pain after adjusting for age and sex (β=0.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.06–0.26; p<0.001), but not after adjustment for other confounders (β=–0.13; 95% CI, –1.54 to 0.60; p=0.39).
Conclusion
Our findings indicated that higher dietary inflammation might not be associated with musculoskeletal pain in older adults. However, further investigations are required to confirm these findings.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Exploring the association between dietary Inflammatory Index and chronic pain in US adults using NHANES 1999–2004
    Lunxue Qing, Yingying Zhu, Changhe Yu, Yang Zhang, Jinxia Ni
    Scientific Reports.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The dietary inflammatory index and cardiometabolic parameters in US firefighters
    Andria Christodoulou, Costas A. Christophi, Mercedes Sotos-Prieto, Steven Moffatt, Longgang Zhao, Stefanos N. Kales, James R. Hébert
    Frontiers in Nutrition.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association between dietary inflammatory index and musculoskeletal disorders in adults
    Firoozeh Khamoushi, Davood Soleimani, Farid Najafi, Neshat Ahmadi, Neda Heidarzadeh-Esfahani, Bita Anvari, Ebrahim Shakiba, Yahya Pasdar
    Scientific Reports.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
Barriers, Attitudes, and Dietary Behaviors Regarding Sodium Reduction in the Elderly Korean–Chinese Population in Yanbian, China
Jounghee Lee, Wenying Cui, Meixiang Jin
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2017;8(3):185-194.   Published online June 30, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2017.8.3.05
  • 4,093 View
  • 35 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This research investigated the barriers, attitudes, and dietary behaviors related to sodium reduction among the elderly Korean–Chinese population in Yanbian, China.

Methods

We conducted this pilot study using both descriptive research and a focus group interview at the elderly community center in Yanbian.

Results

In total, 21 elderly Korean–Chinese (average age, 71 years) were examined. The findings showed that the top three barriers to sodium reduction were 1) the difficulties associated with having meals with others, 2) a preference for liquid based-dishes, and 3) the lack of taste in low-sodium dishes. Although the participants strongly believed that a reduced-sodium diet would improve their health, they were poorly aware of the amount of sodium in various foods and dishes. In particular, the focus group interviews with eight participants (mean age, 67 years) revealed that salt-preserved foods (e.g., Korean pickled cabbage called ‘kimchi’ and soybean paste) were frequently consumed as part of their food culture, and that very salty dishes were served at restaurants, both of which lead to a high sodium intake.

Conclusion

This study provides useful preliminary data to help design a nutrition intervention program for sodium reduction that targets the elderly Korean–Chinese population in China.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Assessing Dietary Salt Intake and Pilot-Testing a Home-Based Intervention to Lower Salt Intake Among Filipino College Students
    Angelo Joaquin M. Armas, Jade Alexie E. Aranda, Hyacintha S. Arcos, Ferdinand L. Arellano, Clarissa Bernette L. Arguelles, Angelo Martin M. Arreza, Mark Anthony G. Arriza, Charlene Kristine A. Ascan, Gian Carlo S. Torres
    Journal of Community Health Nursing.2024; 41(1): 57.     CrossRef
  • Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP) of Malay Elderly on Salt Intake and Its Relationship With Blood Pressure
    Hasnah Haron, NurAisyah Farhana Kamal, Hanis Mastura Yahya, Suzana Shahar
    Frontiers in Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Is a Hypertension Diagnosis Associated With Improved Dietary Outcomes Within 2 to 4 Years? A Fixed‐Effects Analysis From the China Health and Nutrition Survey
    Tania C. Aburto, Penny Gordon‐Larsen, Jennifer M. Poti, Annie G. Howard, Linda S. Adair, Christy L. Avery, Barry M. Popkin
    Journal of the American Heart Association.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Gaps in awareness and control of hypertension: a cross-sectional study in Chinese urban adults
    Ai Zhao, Shengjie Tan, Ignatius Man-Yau Szeto, Yan Wang, Liping Meng, Ting Li, Wenzhi Zhao, Meichen Wang, Yumei Zhang
    Journal of Human Hypertension.2018; 32(6): 423.     CrossRef
Association Between Serum Vitamin D and Metabolic Risk Factors in Korean Schoolgirls
Han Byul Jang, Hye-Ja Lee, Ju Yeon Park, Jae-Heon Kang, Jihyun Song
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2013;4(4):179-186.   Published online August 31, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.06.004
  • 3,377 View
  • 20 Download
  • 15 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Vitamin D, a key regulator of bone metabolism, has been recently been linked with energy homeostasis and metabolic disorders in western countries. However, few studies have focused on the association of vitamin D with metabolic risk factors among Asian children. We studied the prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency and the association of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] with metabolic risk factors in Korean schoolgirls.
Methods
The sample consisted of 320 13-year-old girls recruited from two middle schools in the city of Gwacheon, Korea (latitude 37°N), in July 2011. Anthropometric and blood biochemistry data were obtained for this cross-sectional observational study. We also obtained lifestyle data from questionnaires and dietary data from 3-day food diaries.
Results
Vitamin D deficiency [25(OH)D < 20 ng/mL] was noted in 63.8% of participants. The mean 25(OH)D level was not significantly lower in the overweight group. Level of physical activity and vitamin D intake did not significantly affect 25(OH)D. However, 25(OH)D levels were positively correlated with milk intake and negatively correlated with soft drink intake. Serum 25(OH)D had a negative relationship with fasting glucose and insulin resistance index (homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance; HOMA-IR) after adjustment for physical activity and body mass index z score (r = −0.144, p = 0.015), and with metabolic risk score similarly (r = −0.141, p = 0.012). Levels of insulin, HOMA-IR, and systolic blood pressure were higher in girls with deficient 25(OH)D levels than in those with sufficient levels.
Conclusion
We found that low 25(OH)D levels were associated with higher blood glucose and insulin resistance. Korean girls with low 25(OH)D levels could be at increased risk for metabolic disorders.

Citations

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  • The Relationship Between Vitamin D Serum Levels and Metabolic Syndrome in Patients Referred to Central Laboratory of ACECR in Mashhad, Iran
    Azam Shafaei, Zahra Saghiri, Mohammad Pahlavan Noghabi, Jalal Ghorbani, Arezoo Oroji, Fatemeh Sadabadi, Ahmad Vahedi, Maryam Shahi, Mahboobeh Talebi Mehrdar, Malihe Moammeri Salahshooh
    Jentashapir Journal of Cellular and Molecular Biol.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Vitamin D status and blood pressure in children and adolescents: a systematic review of observational studies
    Myriam Abboud, Fatme Al Anouti, Dimitrios Papandreou, Rana Rizk, Nadine Mahboub, Suzan Haidar
    Systematic Reviews.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Relationship Between Vitamin D Status and the Relevant Parameters of Glucose in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes
    Thanh Tung Tran Huu, Huu Dang Tran, Thua Nguyen Tran, Bui Bao Hoang
    Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets .2021; Volume 14: 2489.     CrossRef
  • Different Cabergoline Effect on Metabolic and Anthropometric Parameters in Female Prolactinoma Patients Versus Idiopathic Hyperprolactinemia Patients
    Mohamed M. Aboelnaga, Eman H. Eladawy, Maha M. Elshafei, Nahed Abdullah, Moustafa El. Shaer
    Endocrine, Metabolic & Immune Disorders - Drug Tar.2019; 19(4): 511.     CrossRef
  • Seasonality of tuberculosis in the Republic of Korea, 2006-2016
    Eun Hee Kim, Jong-Myon Bae
    Epidemiology and Health.2018; 40: e2018051.     CrossRef
  • Current Evidence on Vitamin D Deficiency and Metabolic Syndrome in Obese Children: What Does the Evidence from Saudi Arabia Tell Us?
    Asma Alaklabi, Naser Alsharairi
    Children.2018; 5(1): 11.     CrossRef
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    Hyun Yoon, Dae Keun Jeong, Chang Eun Park, Hye Jong Oh, Sung Gil Kim
    International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutriti.2017; 68(1): 121.     CrossRef
  • Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D associated with indicators of body fat and insulin resistance in prepubertal chilean children
    G Cediel, C Corvalán, C Aguirre, D L de Romaña, R Uauy
    International Journal of Obesity.2016; 40(1): 147.     CrossRef
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    Hyun Yoon, Gwang Seok Kim, Sung Gil Kim, Ae Eun Moon
    Journal of Clinical Biochemistry and Nutrition.2015; 57(1): 82.     CrossRef
  • Vitamin D Deficiency and Cardiometabolic Risks: A Juxtaposition of Arab Adolescents and Adults
    Nasser M. Al-Daghri, Yousef Al-Saleh, Naji Aljohani, Majed Alokail, Omar Al-Attas, Abdullah M. Alnaami, Shaun Sabico, Maha Alsulaimani, Mohammed Al-Harbi, Hanan Alfawaz, George P. Chrousos, Joseph Devaney
    PLOS ONE.2015; 10(7): e0131315.     CrossRef
  • Association of Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D with Life Style and Dietary Factors in Egyptian Prepubescent Children
    Mones M. Abu Shady, Mai M. Youssef, Manal A. Shehata, Ebtissam M. Salah El-Din, Heba A. ElMalt
    Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences.2015; 3(1): 80.     CrossRef
  • The Study of Serum Vitamin D and Insulin Resistance in Chinese Populations with Normal Glucose Tolerance
    Lin Ding, Congcong Wang, Heliang Ma, Yuling Tian, Yong Lu, Shuguang Pang
    International Journal of Endocrinology.2014; 2014: 1.     CrossRef
  • Does Sufficient Evidence Exist to Support a Causal Association between Vitamin D Status and Cardiovascular Disease Risk? An Assessment Using Hill’s Criteria for Causality
    Patricia Weyland, William Grant, Jill Howie-Esquivel
    Nutrients.2014; 6(9): 3403.     CrossRef
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    Catherine A. Peterson, Aneesh K. Tosh, Anthony M. Belenchia
    Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metaboli.2014; 5(6): 166.     CrossRef
  • Vitamin D Status among Thai School Children and the Association with 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D and Parathyroid Hormone Levels
    Lisa A. Houghton, Andrew R. Gray, Michelle J. Harper, Pattanee Winichagoon, Tippawan Pongcharoen, Sueppong Gowachirapant, Rosalind S. Gibson, Dominique Heymann
    PLoS ONE.2014; 9(8): e104825.     CrossRef
Article
Dietary Patterns and Osteoporosis Risk in Postmenopausal Korean Women
Seon-Joo Park, Seong-Eun Joo, Haesook Min, Jae Kyung Park, Yeonjung Kim, Sung Soo Kim, Younjhin Ahn
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2012;3(4):199-205.   Published online December 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2012.10.005
  • 3,417 View
  • 20 Download
  • 28 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The prevalence of osteoporosis and related fractures has increased rapidly in Korean women. Proper nutrition intake is associated with the prevention of osteoporosis. We analyzed the association between dietary patterns and the risk of osteoporosis during a 4-year follow-up in postmenopausal Korean women.
Methods
Postmenopausal women (n = 1,725) who participated in the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study were enrolled. Food intake was assessed using a validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire, and a quantitative ultrasound device was used to measure the speed of sound at the radius and tibia.
Results
Three major dietary patterns were identified using factor analysis based on baseline intake data: traditional (high intake of rice, kimchi, and vegetables), dairy (high intake of milk, dairy products, and green tea), and western (high intake of sugar, fat, and bread). Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate relative risk for osteoporosis. An inverse association was detected between the dairy dietary pattern and the osteoporosis incidence [relative risk (RR): 0.63, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.42–0.93, p-trend=0.055 in radius; RR: 0.56, 95% CI: 0.35–0.90, p-trend=0.048 in tibia]. Individuals in the highest quintile for the traditional dietary pattern (p-trend = 0.009 in tibia) and western dietary pattern (p-trend = 0.043 in radius) demonstrated a higher risk of osteoporosis incidence than those in the lowest quintile.
Conclusion
These results suggested that high consumption of milk, dairy products, and green tea may reduce the risk of osteoporosis in postmenopausal Korean women.

Citations

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Original Article
The Influence of Dietary Patterns on the Nutritional Profile in a Korean Child Cohort Study
Hyeon-Jeong Choi, Hyojee Joung, Hye-Ja Lee, Han Byul Jang, Jae-Heon Kang, Jihyun Song
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2011;2(1):59-64.   Published online June 30, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2011.04.007
  • 3,148 View
  • 17 Download
  • 14 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The aim of the present study was to identify the major dietary patterns of seven- and eight-year-old Korean children and to examine the relationship between dietary patterns and obesity, nutrient intake, and diet quality.
Methods
The subjects were 284 seven- and eight-year-old children who participated in the Gwacheon child cohort study. Three dietary patterns emerged from the factor analysis: Korean, modified Western, and Western. Cluster analysis was used to classify the subjects into two dietary groups: Korean and Western diet patterns.
Results
The two different dietary patterns were closely related to dietary quality which in turn was related to health risks. The Western diet group had a lower fiber intake, a higher intake of energy, fat and calcium and a higher dietary diversity score (DDS) than the Korean diet group. The number of days when fruit, milk and dairy products were omitted from the diet was higher for the Korean diet group than for the Western group.
Conclusions
Dietary patterns and related diet quality should be considered when designing nutrition policy and intervention programs for children.

Citations

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PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives