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Mediation Effects of Basic Psychological Needs Between Autonomy Support from Healthcare Providers and Self-Management Among Cancer Survivors
Eun-Jung Bae, Yun-Hee Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2019;10(6):385-393.   Published online December 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2019.10.6.09
  • 3,602 View
  • 174 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study examined the mediating effects of basic psychological needs between patient autonomy support from healthcare providers, and self-management among cancer survivors.

Methods

This study collected data from 148 cancer patients who had visited D hospitals in B city, Korea. A structured questionnaire was distributed to determine patient characteristics, healthcare provider autonomy support, basic psychological needs, and self-management. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Pearson’s correlation coefficient, and regression analysis that implemented Baron and Kenny’s method for mediation were used for analyses.

Results

Self-management was significantly correlated with the level of healthcare provider autonomy support (r = 0.38, p < 0.001), autonomy (r = 0.40, p < 0.001), competence (r = 0.25, p = 0.002), and relatedness (r = 0.32, p < 0.001). Furthermore, autonomy (β = 0.30, p < 0.001) and relatedness (β = 0.22, p = 0.008) had partial mediating effects on the relationship between healthcare provider autonomy support and self-management (Z = 3.13, p = 0.002 and Z = 2.29, p = 0.022, respectively).

Conclusion

Autonomy and relatedness mediated the impact of healthcare provider autonomy support for self-management among cancer survivors. This suggests that strategies for enhancing autonomy and relatedness should be considered when developing self-management interventions for cancer survivor patients.

Citations

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  • Integrated, cross-sectoral psycho-oncology (isPO): a new form of care for newly diagnosed cancer patients in Germany
    Michael Kusch, Hildegard Labouvie, Vera Schiewer, Natalie Talalaev, Jan C. Cwik, Sonja Bussmann, Lusine Vaganian, Alexander L. Gerlach, Antje Dresen, Natalia Cecon, Sandra Salm, Theresia Krieger, Holger Pfaff, Clarissa Lemmen, Lisa Derendorf, Stephanie St
    BMC Health Services Research.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Interaction styles of health care professionals supporting patients with chronic conditions in general hospitals towards self-management: one-year follow-up data from a brief educational intervention
    Davy Vancampfort, James Mugisha
    International Journal of Health Promotion and Educ.2022; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Factors associated with self‐management after hybrid revascularization in patients with peripheral artery disease: A structural equations model
    So‐Young Kim, Yun Mi Lee, Youn‐Jung Son
    Journal of Advanced Nursing.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Morbidity Profile of Cases Attended Oncology Center of Mansoura University (OCMU), Egypt: A Cross-Sectional Study
Miada M. F. Elmetwaly, Ziad A. Emarah, Abd Elhamied M. Abd Elhamied, Mohamed A. Hegazy, Emily A. Kamel, Adel I. Al-Wehedy
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2019;10(3):177-186.   Published online June 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2019.10.3.09
  • 3,649 View
  • 53 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

In Egypt, the National Cancer Registry Program integrates hospital-based data from multiple Egyptian governorates to obtain representative rates. Unfortunately, Dakahlia (one of the largest Egyptian governorates) was not integrated in the National Cancer Registry Program. This research aimed to acquire malignancy rates from the Oncology Center of Mansoura University, which is one of the two oncology centers present in Dakalia Governorate in Egypt.

Methods

Electronic records of patients who attended the Oncology Center of Mansoura University during 2016 were accessed with permission. Analysis was performed to extract diagnostic categories (age, gender, and geographic distribution of cases).

Results

Most commonly diagnosed malignancies were breast cancer which represented about 10% of cases in the Oncology Center of Mansoura University during 2016. This was followed by leukemia (3.80%), lymphoma (3.59%), and liver cancer (3.44%). Diagnoses encountered included benign and malignant tumors as well as non-tumor diagnoses. The Mansoura district had the highest proportionate rate of breast cancer cases. Females in the age group ≥ 35 < 60 years had the highest incidence of malignancy cases across all diagnoses.

Conclusion

The burden of breast cancer in Mansoura district is high. Risk factors need further evaluation with a recommendation to perform an environmental risk assessment.

Citations

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  • Parental occupational and environmental risk factors for childhood bone cancer in Mansoura oncology center: a case control study
    S El-Helaly, E Khashaba, H El Domiaty, A Darwish
    International Journal of Environmental Health Rese.2022; : 1.     CrossRef
Comparative Analysis of the Trends in Medical Utilization of Cancer Inpatients in Korea
Hyun-Ju Lee, Sung-Soo Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2017;8(5):342-350.   Published online October 31, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2017.8.5.08
  • 2,368 View
  • 30 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Cancer has attracted worldwide attention. The incidence and prevalence are increasing, and it is the main cause of death. The purpose of this study was to identify the characteristics of hospitalized cancer patients.

Methods

This study is a secondary data study using the Korean National Hospital Discharge In-depth Injury Survey Data conducted annually by the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Using these data, we extracted inpatients who principal diagnosis is cancer for nine years from 2005 to 2013.

Results

According to the analysis, the annual trend of cancer inpatients is steadily increasing. In 2025, it is expected to increase to about 670,000 inpatients. A cancer diagnosis created a change in medical utilization depending on the characteristics of patients and hospital. Men are more at risk of cancer than women. The number of hospital beds and hospital days were inversely proportional to cancer inpatients. There was also a difference in the equity of medical utilization by region. Other cancer management policies should be based on sex.

Conclusion

Populations between the ages of 45 and 64 years should be a priority in cancer policy. Because of the long-term hospitalization of patients with death as the outcome, a terminal cancer patient care facility is needed. These conclusions can provide a basis for various health policies.

Influence of Socioeconomic Status, Comorbidity, and Disability on Late-stage Cancer Diagnosis
Bo Ram Park, So Young Kim, Dong Wook Shin, Hyung Kook Yang, Jong Hyock Park
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2017;8(4):264-270.   Published online August 31, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2017.8.4.06
  • 2,710 View
  • 29 Download
  • 6 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Understanding factors affecting advanced stage at diagnosis is vital to improve cancer outcomes and overall survival. We investigated the factors affecting later-stage cancer diagnosis.

Methods

Patients completed self-reported questionnaires. We collected cancer stage data from medical records review. Logistic regression analyses were performed to identify factors associated with later stage cancer at diagnosis by gender.

Results

In total, 1,870 cancer patients were included in the study; 55.8% were men, 31.1% had more than one comorbid condition, and 63.5% had disabilities. About half of the patients were smokers, and drank alcohol, and 58.0% were diagnosed at an advanced stage. By cancer type, lung and liver cancers (both genders), prostate (men), colorectal, cervical, and thyroid cancer (women) were more likely to be diagnosed at a later stage. After controlling for socioeconomic factors, comorbidity (odds ratio [OR], 1.48 in men) and disability (OR, 1.64 in men and 1.52 in women) remained significantly associated with late-stage diagnosis.

Conclusion

In this nationwide study, using combined information from patients and medical records, we found that male patients with comorbidities or disabilities, and female patients with disabilities were more likely to have advanced stage cancer at diagnosis. Targeted approaches by cancer type and health conditions are recommended.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Obstacles dans le dépistage du cancer du sein chez les personnes ayant un handicap
    Sylvia Mazellier, Rajeev Ramanah, Catherine Guldenfels, Carole Mathelin
    Bulletin du Cancer.2022; 109(2): 185.     CrossRef
  • Cancer Disparities Experienced by People with Disabilities
    Rosemary B. Hughes, Susan Robinson-Whelen, Carly Knudson
    International Journal of Environmental Research an.2022; 19(15): 9187.     CrossRef
  • Prognostic factors and survival analysis of Hurthle cell carcinoma: A population-based study
    Bailey M. Humphreys, Kelvin O. Memeh, Alex Funkhouser, Tanaz M. Vaghaiwalla
    Surgery.2022; 172(5): 1379.     CrossRef
  • Impact of comorbidity assessment methods to predict non-cancer mortality risk in cancer patients: a retrospective observational study using the National Health Insurance Service claims-based data in Korea
    Sanghee Lee, Yoon Jung Chang, Hyunsoon Cho
    BMC Medical Research Methodology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Disparities in the Diagnosis, Treatment, and Survival Rate of Cervical Cancer among Women with and without Disabilities
    Jin Young Choi, Kyoung Eun Yeob, Seung Hwa Hong, So Young Kim, Eun-Hwan Jeong, Dong Wook Shin, Jong Heon Park, Gil-won Kang, Hak Soon Kim, Jong Hyock Park, Ichiro Kawachi
    Cancer Control.2021; 28: 107327482110552.     CrossRef
  • Gynecologic Care in Women With Down Syndrome
    Anna J. B. Smith, Jeremy Applebaum, Edward J. Tanner, George T. Capone
    Obstetrics & Gynecology.2020; 136(3): 518.     CrossRef
Analysis of Factors Affecting Women of Childbearing Age to Screen Using Visual Inspection with Acetic Acid
Sondang Sidabutar, Santi Martini, Chatarina Umbul Wahyuni
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2017;8(1):61-64.   Published online February 28, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2017.8.1.08
  • 2,874 View
  • 34 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The purpose of this study was to evaluate patient factors such as knowledge, attitude, motivation, perception, socio-economic status and travel time to health facilities and assess how these factors affected patients’ decision to pursue cervical cancer screening with visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA).

Methods

A total of 80 women of childbearing age who visited Kenjeran and Balongsari Public Health Centers for health assessments were involved in this study. Patients who agreed to participate in the study underwent a verbal questionnaire to evaluate various factors.

Results

Bivariate analysis concluded that knowledge, attitude, motivation, perception, socioeconomic status, and travel time to health facilities were significantly different between women who received VIA screening and women who did not receive VIA screening (p < 0.05). The factors of knowledge, attitudes, motivation, perception, socio-economic status, and the travel time to health facilities accounted for 2.920-fold, 2.043-fold, 3.704-fold, 2.965-fold, 3.198-fold and 2.386-fold possibility, respectively, of patients to pursue cervical cancer screening with VIA. Multivariate analysis showed that perception, socio-economic status, and travel time to health facilities were the most important factors influencing whether or not women pursued VIA screening.

Conclusion

Knowledge, attitude, motivation, perception, socio-economic status, and travel time to health facilities appears to affect women’s’ decision to pursue cervical cancer screening with VIA, with the largest intake being the motivational factor.

Citations

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  • Barriers to and Facilitators of Cervical Cancer Screening among Women in Southeast Asia: A Systematic Review
    Brandon Chua, Viva Ma, Caitlin Asjes, Ashley Lim, Mahsa Mohseni, Hwee Lin Wee
    International Journal of Environmental Research an.2021; 18(9): 4586.     CrossRef
  • Health Education of Visual Inspection of Acetic Acid using Audiovisual Toward Motivation of Childbearing Age Women To Do the Test : A Case Study in Jemawan Klaten
    S S T Hamranani, Devi Permatasari, Indriani
    Journal of Physics: Conference Series.2019; 1179(1): 012128.     CrossRef
Epidemiology and Inequality in the Incidence and Mortality of Nasopharynx Cancer in Asia
Neda Mahdavifar, Mahshid Ghoncheh, Abdollah Mohammadian-Hafshejani, Bahman Khosravi, Hamid Salehiniya
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2016;7(6):360-372.   Published online December 31, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2016.11.002
  • 2,493 View
  • 19 Download
  • 36 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
One of the most common head and neck cancers is nasopharynx cancer. Knowledge about the incidence and mortality of this disease and its distribution in terms of geographical areas is necessary for further study and better planning. Therefore, this study was conducted with the aim of determining the incidence and mortality rates of nasopharynx cancer and its relationship with the Human Development Index (HDI) in Asia in 2012.
Methods
The aim of this ecologic study was to assess the correlation between age-specific incidence rate (ASIR) and age-specific mortality rate (ASMR) with HDI and its components, which include the following: life expectancy at birth, mean years of schooling, and gross national income per capita. Data about SIR and SMR for every Asian country for 2012 were obtained from the global cancer project. We used the correlation bivariate method for the assessment. Statistical significance was assumed if p < 0.05. All reported p values are two-sided. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS (Version 15.0, SPSS Inc.).
Results
A total of 68,272 cases (males, 71.02%; females, 28.97%; sex ratio, 2.45) and 40,530 mortalities (males, 71.63%; females, 28.36%; sex ratio, 2.52) were recorded in Asian countries in 2012. The five countries with the highest ASIR of nasopharynx cancer were Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Vietnam, and Brunei, and the five countries with the highest ASMR were Indonesia, Vietnam, Singapore, Malaysia, and Brunei. The correlation between HDI and ASIR was 0.097 (p = 0.520) [0.105 in men (p = 0.488) and 0.119 in women (p = 0.901)]. The correlation between HDI and ASMR was –0.102 (p = 0.502) [–0.072 in men (p = 0.633) and –0.224 in women (p = 0.134)].
Conclusion
Nasopharynx cancer is native to Southeast Asia. The highest incidence and mortality rates are found in Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Vietnam, and Brunei. No significant relation was found between the standardized incidence and mortality rates of nasopharynx cancer and the HDI components. Further studies are recommended in Southeast Asian countries in order to find the etiology of cancer, as well as its diagnosis and treatment.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Circular RNA circ_0008450 regulates the proliferation, migration, invasion, apoptosis and chemosensitivity of CDDP-resistant nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells by the miR-338-3p/SMAD5 axis
    Lin Liu, Bin Lu, Yan Li
    Anti-Cancer Drugs.2022; 33(1): e260.     CrossRef
  • Hypermethylation of the RASSF1A gene promoter as the tumor DNA marker for nasopharyngeal carcinoma
    Thuan Duc Lao, Hue Hong Thieu, Dung Huu Nguyen, Thuy Ai Huyen Le
    The International Journal of Biological Markers.2022; 37(1): 31.     CrossRef
  • miR-135b-5p Targets SIRT1 to Inhibit Deacetylation of c-JUN and Increase MMP7 Expression to Promote Migration and Invasion of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cells
    Yali Cheng
    Molecular Biotechnology.2022; 64(6): 693.     CrossRef
  • Trends in the Incidence of Nasopharyngeal Cancer in Saudi Arabia Across One Decade (2007 to 2016)
    Abdualrahman F Kabli, Khalil F Miyajan, Abdulmohsen S Alqurashi, Ammar K Mandili, Revan M Mujahed, Bayan F Hafiz, Roaa M Mandora, Ameen Z Herabi
    Cureus.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Causes of Death in Long-Term Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Survivors
    Shi-Ping Yang, Ming-Yue Rao, Qing-Shuang Chen, Ping Zhou, Chen-Lu Lian, San-Gang Wu
    Frontiers in Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Is Mostly Latent and Clonal in Angioimmunoblastic T Cell Lymphoma (AITL)
    Racha Bahri, François Boyer, Mohamad Adnan Halabi, Alain Chaunavel, Jean Feuillard, Arnaud Jaccard, Sylvie Ranger-Rogez
    Cancers.2022; 14(12): 2899.     CrossRef
  • Study of Three Potential Diagnostic Biomarkers in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Samples from Guilan, North of Iran
    Saghi Jani Kargar Moghaddam, Amaneh Mohammadi Roushandeh, Mehryar Habibi Roudkenar, Shadman Nemati, Nima Najafi-Ghalehlou, Toofan Pakzad, Masoud Hamidi
    International Archives of Otorhinolaryngology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Ming Shi, Jiangnan Du, Jingjing Shi, Yunchuanxiang Huang, Yan Zhao, Lan Ma
    Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Platelet to Lymphocytes Ratio to Predict Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Progressivity
    Goesti Yudistira, Yussy Afriani Dewi, Melati Sudiro
    Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences.2022; 10(B): 2189.     CrossRef
  • Skin sparing in intensity-modulated radiation therapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma
    MisbaHamid Baba, BenoyK Singh, Shaq ulQamar Wani
    Journal of Medical Physics.2022; 47(3): 243.     CrossRef
  • Assessment of Response to Chemoradiation and Radiation Therapy in Patients with Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma
    Sebastian Ario Susanto, Yussy Afriani Dewi, Raden Ayu Hardianti Saputri
    Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences.2022; 10(B): 2307.     CrossRef
  • Genetic variants in NKG2D axis and susceptibility to Epstein–Barr virus-induced nasopharyngeal carcinoma
    Nguyen Hoang Viet, Nguyen Quang Trung, Le Thanh Dong, Ly Quoc Trung, J. Luis Espinoza
    Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology.2021; 147(3): 713.     CrossRef
  • Corticosteroid Therapy in Optic Neuropathy Secondary to Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma
    Zulaikha Wahab, Evelyn Tai, Wan-Hazabbah Wan Hitam, Khairy Shamel Sonny Teo
    Cureus.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Effect of Hispidulin, a Flavonoid from Salvia plebeia, on Human Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma CNE-2Z Cell Proliferation, Migration, Invasion, and Apoptosis
    Yiqun Dai, Xiaolong Sun, Bohan Li, Hui Ma, Pingping Wu, Yingping Zhang, Meilin Zhu, Hong-Mei Li, Minjian Qin, Cheng-Zhu Wu
    Molecules.2021; 26(6): 1604.     CrossRef
  • δ-Tocotrienol induces apoptosis and inhibits proliferation of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells
    Junjun Shen, Tao Yang, Yiping Tang, Tianyi Guo, Ting Guo, Tao Hu, Feijun Luo, Qinlu Lin
    Food & Function.2021; 12(14): 6374.     CrossRef
  • WNT8B as an Independent Prognostic Marker for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma
    Chawalit Ngernsombat, Pongphol Prattapong, Noppadol Larbcharoensub, Krittika Khotthong, Tavan Janvilisri
    Current Oncology.2021; 28(4): 2529.     CrossRef
  • Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma and Its Association with Epstein-Barr Virus
    Harish N. Vasudevan, Sue S. Yom
    Hematology/Oncology Clinics of North America.2021; 35(5): 963.     CrossRef
  • Association between stage and histopathological type of nasopharyngeal cancer on occurrence of postirradiation otitis media with effusion
    Lina Lasminingrum, Shinta Fitri Boesoeri, Sally Mahdiani, Eveline Sabrina Ranti
    International Journal of Surgery Open.2021; 36: 100376.     CrossRef
  • Current Status and Future Perspectives about Molecular Biomarkers of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma
    Pui Yan Siak, Alan Soo-Beng Khoo, Chee Onn Leong, Boon-Peng Hoh, Shiau-Chuen Cheah
    Cancers.2021; 13(14): 3490.     CrossRef
  • Carcinomatous‑like mastitis due to axillary lymphadenopathy in a case of nasopharyngeal carcinoma: A case report
    Cristina Oprean, Nusa Segarceanu, Alexandra Stan, Cristian Suciu, Daciana Grujic, Ioana Rivis, Alis Liliana Dema, Ana Bredicean
    Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Dosimetric Comparison of Helical Tomotherapy, Volume-Modulated Arc Therapy, and Fixed-Field Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma
    Shan Lu, Huiqi Fan, Xueyuan Hu, Xin Li, Yingying Kuang, Deyang Yu, Shanshan Yang
    Frontiers in Oncology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The dosimetric comparison between tomotherapy and RapidArc in normal tissue sparing for nasopharyngeal carcinoma
    Pubade Kaewpruk, Somvilai Chakrabandhu, Somsak Wanwilairat, Wannapha Nobnop
    Journal of Radiotherapy in Practice.2020; 19(3): 237.     CrossRef
  • Combination of Plasma MIF and VCA-IgA Improves the Diagnostic Specificity for Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma
    Ning Xue, Shan Xing, Weiguo Ma, Jiahe Sheng, Zhiliang Huang, Qingxia Xu
    Technology in Cancer Research & Treatment.2020; 19: 153303382093577.     CrossRef
  • Pathological features of nasopharyngeal carcinoma: A single-center study in Vietnam
    Nguyen Cuong Pham, Thanh Xuan Nguyen, Nguyen Tuong Pham, Thanh Chinh Phan, Hai Thanh Phan
    Annals of Cancer Research and Therapy.2020; 28(2): 125.     CrossRef
  • Association between variant alleles of major histocompatibility complex class II regulatory genes and nasopharyngeal carcinoma susceptibility
    Ping Zhou, Sha Liu, Nan-Nan Ji, Shuang Zhang, Peng Wang, Bing Lin, Ping Yang, Xian-Tao Lin, Yi-Zheng Cai, Zi-Ming Wang, Han Zhou, Shi-Yao Sun, Xin-Bao Hao
    European Journal of Cancer Prevention.2020; 29(6): 531.     CrossRef
  • Hyperperfusion Syndrome and Baroreflex Failure following Carotid Artery Angioplasty and Stenting for Symptomatic Radiation-Associated Carotid Artery Stenosis
    Hui-Meng Chang
    Case Reports in Neurology.2020; 12(Suppl. 1): 76.     CrossRef
  • Novel patterns of the Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen (EBNA-1) V-Val subtype in EBV-associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma from Vietnam
    LD Thuan, ND Kha, NT Minh, LHA Thuy
    Balkan Journal of Medical Genetics.2019; 22(1): 61.     CrossRef
  • miR-29c regulates resistance to paclitaxel in nasopharyngeal cancer by targeting ITGB1
    Limin Huang, Chaoquan Hu, Hui Chao, Rongpin Wang, He Lu, Hong Li, Hui Chen
    Experimental Cell Research.2019; 378(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Systematic review and meta-analysis of prognostic microRNA biomarkers for survival outcome in nasopharyngeal carcinoma
    Shanthi Sabarimurugan, Chellan Kumarasamy, Siddhartha Baxi, Arikketh Devi, Rama Jayaraj, Yukinori Takenaka
    PLOS ONE.2019; 14(2): e0209760.     CrossRef
  • Epstein‐Barr virus strain variation and cancer
    Teru Kanda, Misako Yajima, Kazufumi Ikuta
    Cancer Science.2019; 110(4): 1132.     CrossRef
  • Nasopharyngeal cancer in Saudi Arabia: Epidemiology and possible risk factors
    Abdullah Dakheel Alotaibi, Hussain Gadelkarim Ahmed, Abdelbaset Mohamed Elasbali
    Journal of Oncological Sciences.2019; 5(1): 23.     CrossRef
  • Association BetweenLMP-1,LMP-2, and miR-155 Expression as Potential Biomarker in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients: A Case/Control Study in Vietnam
    Thuan Duc Lao, Thuy Ai Huyen Le
    Genetic Testing and Molecular Biomarkers.2019; 23(11): 815.     CrossRef
  • Lapatinib sensitivity in nasopharyngeal carcinoma is modulated by SIRT2-mediated FOXO3 deacetylation
    Sathid Aimjongjun, Zimam Mahmud, Yannasittha Jiramongkol, Glowi Alasiri, Shang Yao, Ernesto Yagüe, Tavan Janvilisri, Eric W.-F. Lam
    BMC Cancer.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • PPARβ/δ Agonist GW501516 Inhibits Tumorigenicity of Undifferentiated Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma in C666-1 Cells by Promoting Apoptosis
    Yangyang Ji, Hui Li, Fang Wang, Linglan Gu
    Frontiers in Pharmacology.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Pembrolizumab in Asia-Pacific patients with advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: Analyses from KEYNOTE-012
    Makoto Tahara, Kei Muro, Yasuhisa Hasegawa, Hyun Cheol Chung, Chia-Chi Lin, Bhumsuk Keam, Kenichi Takahashi, Jonathan D. Cheng, Yung-Jue Bang
    Cancer Science.2018; 109(3): 771.     CrossRef
  • KISS1gene suppresses metastasis of nasopharyngeal cancerviaactivation of the ERK1/2 pathway
    Tingting Li, Qian Sun, Yan Zhou, Zelai He, Hao Liu, Ping Xiang, Jin Xi, Xiazi Zhang, Hao Jiang
    RSC Advances.2017; 7(84): 53445.     CrossRef
Intake Trends of Red Meat, Alcohol, and Fruits and Vegetables as Cancer-Related Dietary Factors from 1998 to 2009
Min Kyung Park, Hee Young Paik, Yeonsook Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2016;7(3):180-189.   Published online June 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2016.04.005
  • 1,898 View
  • 15 Download
  • 7 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide, and cancer incidence and mortality have been increasing steadily in South Korea. This study aimed to examine the change in consumption of three cancer-related dietary factors—red meat, alcohol, and fruits/vegetables, and to evaluate consumption of these dietary factors among Koreans according to the criteria from the recommendations of the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute of Cancer Research.
Methods
Consumption of red meat, alcoholic beverages, and fruits and vegetables was calculated from the 24-hour recall data of 36,486 individuals older than 20 years who were selected from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1998–2009. The intake adequacy of these three factors was evaluated by the recommended criteria of the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute of Cancer Research report.
Results
The mean red meat intake in the men in their 20s increased sharply (from 91.6 g to 111.3 g, p < 0.05). The mean alcohol intake increased continuously in men (from 10.3 g to 20.0 g, p < 0.05) and women (from 1.5 g to 3.5 g, p < 0.05). The mean fruit/vegetable intake decreased in the 21–29–year age group (from 349.4 g to 306.7 g in men; from 393.3 g to 292.5 g in women; p < 0.05). The percentage of individuals who did not meet the intake criteria for the three cancer-related dietary factors was especially high, and the percentage increased over 10 years in those in their 20s (p < 0.05).
Conclusion
We confirmed that intakes of red meat, alcoholic drink, and fruits and vegetables have moved toward a negative direction in both men and women in their 20s.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Lifestyle and Sociodemographic and Economic Characteristics of Patients with Lung Cancer in Morocco
    Imane Harkati, Mohamed Kamal Hilali, Nezha Oumghar, Mouna Khouchani, Mohamed Loukid
    Canadian Respiratory Journal.2020; 2020: 1.     CrossRef
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    So-young Kim, EunJu Lee
    British Food Journal.2020; 122(9): 2841.     CrossRef
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    Jakyung Son, Yujin Lee, Kyong Park
    European Journal of Nutrition.2019; 58(6): 2477.     CrossRef
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    Hye Ah Lee, Hyo Jeong Hwang, Se Young Oh, Eun Hee Ha, Hyesook Park
    Environmental Pollution.2018; 243: 189.     CrossRef
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    Hye Lee, Hyesook Park
    Nutrients.2018; 10(8): 1077.     CrossRef
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    Ji Kim, Jeonghee Lee, So-Youn Jung, Jeongseon Kim
    Nutrients.2017; 9(12): 1331.     CrossRef
  • Associations between high-risk alcohol consumption and sarcopenia among postmenopausal women
    Yu-Jin Kwon, Hyoung-Ji Lim, Yong-Jae Lee, Hye-Sun Lee, John A. Linton, Jae Woo Lee, Hee-Taik Kang
    Menopause.2017; 24(9): 1022.     CrossRef
Joint Disease Mapping of Two Digestive Cancers in Golestan Province, Iran Using a Shared Component Model
Parisa Chamanpara, Abbas Moghimbeigi, Javad Faradmal, Jalal Poorolajal
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2015;6(3):205-210.   Published online June 30, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2015.02.002
  • 1,840 View
  • 15 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Recent studies have suggested the occurrence patterns and related diet factor of esophagus cancer (EC) and gastric cancer (GC). Incidence of these cancers was mapped either in general and stratified by sex. The aim of this study was to model the geographical variation in incidence of these two related cancers jointly to explore the relative importance of an intended risk factor, diet low in fruit and vegetable intake, in Golestan, Iran.
Methods
Data on the incidence of EC and GC between 2004 and 2008 were extracted from Golestan Research Center of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Hamadan, Iran. These data were registered as new observations in 11 counties of the province yearly. The Bayesian shared component model was used to analyze the spatial variation of incidence rates jointly and in this study we analyzed the data using this model. Joint modeling improved the precision of estimations of underlying diseases pattern, and thus strengthened the relevant results.
Results
From 2004 to 2008, the joint incidence rates of the two cancers studied were relatively high (0.8–1.2) in the Golestan area. The general map showed that the northern part of the province was at higher risk than the other parts. Thus the component representing diet low in fruit and vegetable intake had larger effect of EC and GC incidence rates in this part. This incidence risk pattern was retained for female but for male was a little different.
Conclusion
Using a shared component model for joint modeling of incidence rates leads to more precise estimates, so the common risk factor, a diet low in fruit and vegetables, is important in this area and needs more attention in the allocation and delivery of public health policies.

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    Ningxu Zhang, Yilan Liao, Zhoupeng Ren
    International Health.2021; 13(2): 161.     CrossRef
  • Epidemiologic Study of Gastric Cancer in Iran: A Systematic Review


    Khadijeh Kalan Farmanfarma, Neda Mahdavifar, Soheil Hassanipour, Hamid Salehiniya
    Clinical and Experimental Gastroenterology.2020; Volume 13: 511.     CrossRef
  • Bivariate spatio-temporal shared component modeling: Mapping of relative death risk due to colorectal and stomach cancers in Iran provinces
    Vahid Ahmadipanahmehrabadi, Akbar Hassanzadeh, Behzad Mahaki
    International Journal of Preventive Medicine.2019; 10(1): 39.     CrossRef
  • Spatial Patterns of Ischemic Heart Disease in Shenzhen, China: A Bayesian Multi-Disease Modelling Approach to Inform Health Planning Policies
    Qingyun Du, Mingxiao Zhang, Yayan Li, Hui Luan, Shi Liang, Fu Ren
    International Journal of Environmental Research an.2016; 13(4): 436.     CrossRef
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    Carlos Carcach, Evelyn Artola
    Crime Science.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
Gastric and Esophageal Cancers Incidence Mapping in Golestan Province, Iran: Using Bayesian–Gibbs Sampling
Atefeh-Sadat Hosseintabar Marzoni, Abbas Moghimbeigi, Javad Faradmal
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2015;6(2):100-105.   Published online April 30, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2015.01.004
  • 1,786 View
  • 16 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Recent studies of esophageal cancer (EC) and gastric cancer (GC) have been reported to have high incidence rates of these cancers in Golestan Province of Iran. The present study describes the geographical patterns of EC and GC incidence based on cancer registry data and display statistically significant regions within this province.
Methods
In order to map the distribution of upper gastrointestinal cancer, relative risk (RR) were calculated. Therefore, to estimate a more reliable RR, Poisson regression models were used. The adjusted models (adjusted to urban–rural area, sex, and grouped age proportion) were utilized. We considered two-component random effects for each observation, an unstructured (noncorrelated) and a group of “neighbor” (correlated) heterogeneities. We estimated the model parameters using Gibbs sampling and empirical Bayes method. We used EC and GC data that were registered with Golestan Research Center of Gastroenterology and Hepatology in the years 2004–2008.
Results
The EC and GC maps were drawn for 2004–2008 in the province. Kalaleh and Minoodasht counties have a high RR of EC and GC in the years of study. In almost all years, the areas with a high RR were steady.
Conclusion
The EC and GC maps showed significant spatial patterns of risk in Golestan province of Iran. Further study is needed to multivariate clustering and mapping of cancers RRs with considering diet and socioeconomic factors.

Citations

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  • Meat consumption and risk of esophageal and gastric cancer in the Golestan Cohort Study, Iran
    Giulia Collatuzzo, Arash Etemadi, Masoud Sotoudeh, Arash Nikmanesh, Hossein Poustchi, Masoud Khoshnia, Akram Pourshams, Maryam Hashemian, Gholamreza Roshandel, Sanford M. Dawsey, Christian C. Abnet, Farin Kamangar, Paul Brennan, Paolo Boffetta, Reza Malek
    International Journal of Cancer.2022; 151(7): 1005.     CrossRef
  • Epidemiologic Study of Gastric Cancer in Iran: A Systematic Review


    Khadijeh Kalan Farmanfarma, Neda Mahdavifar, Soheil Hassanipour, Hamid Salehiniya
    Clinical and Experimental Gastroenterology.2020; Volume 13: 511.     CrossRef
  • Building cancer registries in a lower resource setting: The 10-year experience of Golestan, Northern Iran
    Gholamreza Roshandel, Shahryar Semnani, Abdolreza Fazel, Mohammadreza Honarvar, MohammadHossein Taziki, SeyedMehdi Sedaghat, Nafiseh Abdolahi, Mohammad Ashaari, Mohammad Poorabbasi, Susan Hasanpour, SeyedAhmad Hosseini, SeyedMohsen Mansuri, Ataollah Jahan
    Cancer Epidemiology.2018; 52: 128.     CrossRef
Predicting 5-Year Survival Status of Patients with Breast Cancer based on Supervised Wavelet Method
Maryam Farhadian, Hossein Mahjub, Jalal Poorolajal, Abbas Moghimbeigi, Muharram Mansoorizadeh
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(6):324-332.   Published online December 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.09.002
  • 1,725 View
  • 16 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Classification of breast cancer patients into different risk classes is very important in clinical applications. It is estimated that the advent of high-dimensional gene expression data could improve patient classification. In this study, a new method for transforming the high-dimensional gene expression data in a low-dimensional space based on wavelet transform (WT) is presented.
Methods
The proposed method was applied to three publicly available microarray data sets. After dimensionality reduction using supervised wavelet, a predictive support vector machine (SVM) model was built upon the reduced dimensional space. In addition, the proposed method was compared with the supervised principal component analysis (PCA).
Results
The performance of supervised wavelet and supervised PCA based on selected genes were better than the signature genes identified in the other studies. Furthermore, the supervised wavelet method generally performed better than the supervised PCA for predicting the 5-year survival status of patients with breast cancer based on microarray data. In addition, the proposed method had a relatively acceptable performance compared with the other studies.
Conclusion
The results suggest the possibility of developing a new tool using wavelets for the dimension reduction of microarray data sets in the classification framework.

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    Shiva Borzouei, Hossein Mahjub, NegarAsaad Sajadi, Maryam Farhadian
    Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care.2020; 9(3): 1470.     CrossRef
  • Thyroid disorder diagnosis based on Mamdani fuzzy inference system classifier
    Negar Asaad Sajadi, Hossein Mahjub, Shiva Borzouei, Maryam Farhadian
    Koomesh Journal.2020; 22(1): 107.     CrossRef
  • Diagnosis of hypothyroidism using a fuzzy rule-based expert system
    Negar Asaad Sajadi, Shiva Borzouei, Hossein Mahjub, Maryam Farhadian
    Clinical Epidemiology and Global Health.2019; 7(4): 519.     CrossRef
  • WaveICA: A novel algorithm to remove batch effects for large-scale untargeted metabolomics data based on wavelet analysis
    Kui Deng, Fan Zhang, Qilong Tan, Yue Huang, Wei Song, Zhiwei Rong, Zheng-Jiang Zhu, Kang Li, Zhenzi Li
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A New Direction of Cancer Classification: Positive Effect of Low-Ranking MicroRNAs
Feifei Li, Minghao Piao, Yongjun Piao, Meijing Li, Keun Ho Ryu
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(5):279-285.   Published online October 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.08.004
  • 1,825 View
  • 14 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Many studies based on microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles showed a new aspect of cancer classification. Because one characteristic of miRNA expression data is the high dimensionality, feature selection methods have been used to facilitate dimensionality reduction. The feature selection methods have one shortcoming thus far: they just consider the problem of where feature to class is 1:1 or n:1. However, because one miRNA may influence more than one type of cancer, human miRNA is considered to be ranked low in traditional feature selection methods and are removed most of the time. In view of the limitation of the miRNA number, low-ranking miRNAs are also important to cancer classification.
Methods
We considered both high- and low-ranking features to cover all problems (1:1, n:1, 1:n, and m:n) in cancer classification. First, we used the correlation-based feature selection method to select the high-ranking miRNAs, and chose the support vector machine, Bayes network, decision tree, k-nearest-neighbor, and logistic classifier to construct cancer classification. Then, we chose Chi-square test, information gain, gain ratio, and Pearson's correlation feature selection methods to build the m:n feature subset, and used the selected miRNAs to determine cancer classification.
Results
The low-ranking miRNA expression profiles achieved higher classification accuracy compared with just using high-ranking miRNAs in traditional feature selection methods.
Conclusion
Our results demonstrate that the m:n feature subset made a positive impression of low-ranking miRNAs in cancer classification.

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    Erdenebileg Batbaatar, Van-Huy Pham, Keun Ho Ryu
    Applied Sciences.2020; 10(3): 834.     CrossRef
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    Moshood A. Hambali, Tinuke O. Oladele, Kayode S. Adewole
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    Jnanendra Prasad Sarkar, Indrajit Saha, Adrian Lancucki, Nimisha Ghosh, Michal Wlasnowolski, Grzegorz Bokota, Ashmita Dey, Piotr Lipinski, Dariusz Plewczynski
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    Peipei Li, Yongjun Piao, Ho Sun Shon, Keun Ho Ryu
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Exposure to Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and the Risk of Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
Jae-Hong Park, Eun Shil Cha, Yousun Ko, Myung-Sil Hwang, Jin-Hwan Hong, Won Jin Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(2):77-84.   Published online April 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.02.001
  • 1,970 View
  • 24 Download
  • 19 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study extended and updated a meta-analysis of the association between exposure to dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and the risk of breast cancer.
Methods
We reviewed the published literature on exposure to DDE and breast cancer risk to update a meta-analysis from 2004. The total of 35 studies included 16 hospital-based case–control studies, 11 population-based case–control studies, and 10 nested case–control studies identified through keyword searches in the PubMed and EMBASE databases.
Results
The summary odds ratio (OR) for the identified studies was 1.03 (95% confidence interval 0.95–1.12) and the overall heterogeneity in the OR was observed (I2 = 40.9; p = 0.006). Subgroup meta-analyses indicated no significant association between exposure to DDE and breast cancer risk by the type of design, study years, biological specimen, and geographical region of the study, except from population-based case–control studies with estimated DDE levels in serum published in 1990s.
Conclusion
Existing studies do not support the view that DDE increases the risk of breast cancer in humans. However, further studies incorporating more detailed information on DDT exposure and other potential risk factors for breast cancer are needed.

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    El Hadia Mansouri, Mohamed Reggabi
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    Yuntao Zhang, Ran Chen, Jim E. Riviere, Jeffrey Comer
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    Delphine Bachelet, Marc-André Verner, Monica Neri, Émilie Cordina Duverger, Corinne Charlier, Patrick Arveux, Sami Haddad, Pascal Guénel
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Comparison of Breast Cancer Screening Results in Korean Middle-Aged Women: A Hospital-based Prospective Cohort Study
TaeBum Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2013;4(4):197-202.   Published online August 31, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.06.002
  • 1,845 View
  • 18 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The aim of this hospital-based prospective study was to evaluate the diagnostic ability of breast cancer screening in Korean middle-aged women using age, ultrasonography, mammography, and magnification mammography, which are commonly used in most hospitals.
Methods
A total of 21 patents were examined using ultrasonography, mammography, and magnification mammography, and their data were prospectively analyzed from August 2011 to March 2013. All patients were divided into benign and malignant groups and the screening results were classified using the American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS). The final pathology report was used as the reference standard and the sensitivity and specificity of ultrasonography, mammography, and magnification mammography were evaluated using receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) analysis.
Results
The analysis included 21 patients who underwent biopsy. Among them, three (14.3%) were positive and 18 (85.7%) negative for breast cancer. The average age was 50.5 years (range = 38–61 years). The sensitivity was the same for ultrasonography and magnification mammography and the specificity of magnification mammography was higher than that of ultrasonography. The highest area under the ROC curve (AUC) was observed in the combination of age and magnification mammography (1.000) and the decreasing order of AUC in others was magnification mammography (0.833), ultrasonography (0.787), mammography (0.667), and age (0.648).
Conclusions
In Korean women, the diagnostic accuracy of magnification mammography was better than that of ultrasonography and mammography. The combination of age and magnification mammography increased the sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy.

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    Maryam Farhadian, Hossein Mahjub, Jalal Poorolajal, Abbas Moghimbeigi, Muharram Mansoorizadeh
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PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives