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Original Article
Investigation of SARS-CoV-2 lineages and mutations circulating in a university-affiliated hospital in South Korea analyzed using Oxford Nanopore MinION sequencing
Hyaekang Kim, Sung Hee Chung, Hyun Soo Kim, Han-Sung Kim, Wonkeun Song, Ki Ho Hong, Jae-Seok Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2022;13(5):360-369.   Published online October 11, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2022.0183
  • 701 View
  • 47 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
Despite the introduction of vaccines, treatments, and massive diagnostic testing, the evolution of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has continued to overcome barriers that had slowed its previous spread. As the virus evolves towards increasing fitness, it is critical to continue monitoring the occurrence of new mutations that could evade human efforts to control them. Methods: We performed whole-genome sequencing using Oxford Nanopore MinION sequencing on 58 SARS-CoV-2 isolates collected during the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic at a tertiary hospital in South Korea and tracked the emergence of mutations responsible for massive spikes in South Korea. Results: The differences among lineages were more pronounced in the spike gene, especially in the receptor-binding domain (RBD), than in other genes. Those RBD mutations could compromise neutralization by antibodies elicited by vaccination or previous infections. We also reported multiple incidences of Omicron variants carrying mutations that could impair the diagnostic sensitivity of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction-based testing. Conclusion: These results provide an understanding of the temporal changes of variants and mutations that have been circulating in South Korea and their potential impacts on antigenicity, therapeutics, and diagnostic escape of the virus. We also showed that the utilization of the nanopore sequencing platform and the ARTIC workf low can provide convenient and accurate SARS-CoV-2 genomic surveillance even at a single hospital.
Brief Report
Genomic Surveillance of SARS-CoV-2: Distribution of Clades in the Republic of Korea in 2020
Ae Kyung Park, Il-Hwan Kim, Junyoung Kim, Jeong-Min Kim, Heui Man Kim, Chae young Lee, Myung-Guk Han, Gi-Eun Rhie, Donghyok Kwon, Jeong-Gu Nam, Young-Joon Park, Jin Gwack, Nam-Joo Lee, SangHee Woo, Jin Sun No, Jaehee Lee, Jeemin Ha, JeeEun Rhee, Cheon-Kwon Yoo, Eun-Jin Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(1):37-43.   Published online February 23, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.12.1.06
  • 4,789 View
  • 189 Download
  • 16 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Since a novel beta-coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) was first reported in December 2019, there has been a rapid global spread of the virus. Genomic surveillance was conducted on samples isolated from infected individuals to monitor the spread of genetic variants of SARS-CoV-2 in Korea. The Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency performed whole genome sequencing of SARS-CoV-2 in Korea for 1 year (January 2020 to January 2021). A total of 2,488 SARS-CoV-2 cases were sequenced (including 648 cases from abroad). Initially, the prevalent clades of SARS-CoV-2 were the S and V clades, however, by March 2020, GH clade was the most dominant. Only international travelers were identified as having G or GR clades, and since the first variant 501Y.V1 was identified (from a traveler from the United Kingdom on December 22nd, 2020), a total of 27 variants of 501Y.V1, 501Y.V2, and 484K.V2 have been classified (as of January 25th, 2021). The results in this study indicated that quarantining of travelers entering Korea successfully prevented dissemination of the SARS-CoV-2 variants in Korea.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Rapid Emergence of the Omicron Variant of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 in Korea
    Ae Kyung Park, Il-Hwan Kim, Chae Young Lee, Jeong-Ah Kim, Hyeokjin Lee, Heui Man Kim, Nam-Joo Lee, SangHee Woo, Jaehee Lee, JeeEun Rhee, Cheon-Kwon Yoo, Eun-Jin Kim
    Annals of Laboratory Medicine.2023; 43(2): 211.     CrossRef
  • Genomic evidence of SARS‐CoV‐2 reinfection in the Republic of Korea
    Ae Kyung Park, Jee Eun Rhee, Il‐Hwan Kim, Heui Man Kim, Hyeokjin Lee, Jeong‐Ah Kim, Chae Young Lee, Nam‐Joo Lee, SangHee Woo, Jaehee Lee, Jin Sun No, Gi‐Eun Rhie, Seong Jin Wang, Sang‐Eun Lee, Young Joon Park, Gemma Park, Jung Yeon Kim, Jin Gwack, Cheon‐K
    Journal of Medical Virology.2022; 94(4): 1717.     CrossRef
  • SARS-CoV-2 B.1.619 and B.1.620 Lineages, South Korea, 2021
    Ae Kyung Park, Il-Hwan Kim, Heui Man Kim, Hyeokjin Lee, Nam-Joo Lee, Jeong-Ah Kim, SangHee Woo, Chae young Lee, Jaehee Lee, Sae Jin Oh, JeeEun Rhee, Cheon-Kwon Yoo, Eun-Jin Kim
    Emerging Infectious Diseases.2022; 28(2): 415.     CrossRef
  • Humoral and Cellular Responses to COVID-19 Vaccines in SARS-CoV-2 Infection-Naïve and -Recovered Korean Individuals
    Ji-Young Hwang, Yunhwa Kim, Kyung-Min Lee, Eun-Jeong Jang, Chang-Hoon Woo, Chang-Ui Hong, Seok-Tae Choi, Sivilay Xayaheuang, Jong-Geol Jang, June-Hong Ahn, Hosun Park
    Vaccines.2022; 10(2): 332.     CrossRef
  • Increase in Viral Load in Patients With SARS-CoV-2 Delta Variant Infection in the Republic of Korea
    Jeong-Min Kim, Jee Eun Rhee, Myeongsu Yoo, Heui Man Kim, Nam-Joo Lee, Sang Hee Woo, Hye-Jun Jo, Donghyok Kwon, Sangwon Lee, Cheon Kwon Yoo, Eun-Jin Kim
    Frontiers in Microbiology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Molecular Dynamics Studies on the Structural Stability Prediction of SARS-CoV-2 Variants Including Multiple Mutants
    Kwang-Eun Choi, Jeong-Min Kim, Jee Eun Rhee, Ae Kyung Park, Eun-Jin Kim, Cheon Kwon Yoo, Nam Sook Kang
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2022; 23(9): 4956.     CrossRef
  • SARS-CoV-2 shedding dynamics and transmission in immunosuppressed patients
    Jee-Soo Lee, Ki Wook Yun, Hyeonju Jeong, Boram Kim, Man Jin Kim, Jae Hyeon Park, Ho Seob Shin, Hyeon Sae Oh, Hobin Sung, Myung Gi Song, Sung Im Cho, So Yeon Kim, Chang Kyung Kang, Pyoeng Gyun Choe, Wan Beom Park, Nam Joong Kim, Myoung-Don Oh, Eun Hwa Choi
    Virulence.2022; 13(1): 1242.     CrossRef
  • Immunological and Pathological Peculiarity of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 Beta Variant
    Sunhee Lee, Gun Young Yoon, Su Jin Lee, Young-Chan Kwon, Hyun Woo Moon, Yu-Jin Kim, Haesoo Kim, Wooseong Lee, Gi Uk Jeong, Chonsaeng Kim, Kyun-Do Kim, Seong-Jun Kim, Dae-Gyun Ahn, Miguel Angel Martinez
    Microbiology Spectrum.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Clinical scoring system to predict viable viral shedding in patients with COVID-19
    Sung Woon Kang, Heedo Park, Ji Yeun Kim, Sunghee Park, So Yun Lim, Sohyun Lee, Joon-Yong Bae, Jeonghun Kim, Seongman Bae, Jiwon Jung, Min Jae Kim, Yong Pil Chong, Sang-Oh Lee, Sang-Ho Choi, Yang Soo Kim, Sung-Cheol Yun, Man-Seong Park, Sung-Han Kim
    Journal of Clinical Virology.2022; 157: 105319.     CrossRef
  • Model-informed COVID-19 exit strategy with projections of SARS-CoV-2 infections generated by variants in the Republic of Korea
    Sung-mok Jung, Kyungmin Huh, Munkhzul Radnaabaatar, Jaehun Jung
    BMC Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Comparative analysis of mutational hotspots in the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 isolates from different geographic origins
    Sanghoo Lee, Mi-Kyeong Lee, Hyeongkyun Na, Jinwoo Ahn, Gayeon Hong, Youngkee Lee, Jimyeong Park, Yejin Kim, Yun-Tae Kim, Chang-Ki Kim, Hwan-Sub Lim, Kyoung-Ryul Lee
    Gene Reports.2021; 23: 101100.     CrossRef
  • Review of Current COVID-19 Diagnostics and Opportunities for Further Development
    Yan Mardian, Herman Kosasih, Muhammad Karyana, Aaron Neal, Chuen-Yen Lau
    Frontiers in Medicine.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Locally harvested Covid-19 convalescent plasma could probably help combat the geographically determined SARS-CoV-2 viral variants
    Manish Raturi, Anuradha Kusum, Mansi Kala, Garima Mittal, Anita Sharma, Naveen Bansal
    Transfusion Clinique et Biologique.2021; 28(3): 300.     CrossRef
  • Molecular Dynamics Studies on the Structural Characteristics for the Stability Prediction of SARS-CoV-2
    Kwang-Eun Choi, Jeong-Min Kim, JeeEun Rhee, Ae Kyung Park, Eun-Jin Kim, Nam Sook Kang
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2021; 22(16): 8714.     CrossRef
  • Management following the first confirmed case of SARS-CoV-2 in a domestic cat associated with a massive outbreak in South Korea
    Taewon Han, Boyeong Ryu, Suyeon Lee, Yugyeong Song, Yoongje Jeong, Ilhwan Kim, Jeongmin Kim, Eunjin Kim, Wonjun Lee, Hyunju Lee, Haekyoung Hwang
    One Health.2021; 13: 100328.     CrossRef
  • Genomic epidemiology reveals the reduction of the introduction and spread of SARS-CoV-2 after implementing control strategies in Republic of Korea, 2020
    Jung-Hoon Kwon, Jeong-Min Kim, Dong-hun Lee, Ae Kyung Park, Il-Hwan Kim, Da-Won Kim, Ji-Yun Kim, Noori Lim, Kyeong-Yeon Cho, Heui Man Kim, Nam-Joo Lee, SangHee Woo, Chae Young Lee, Jin Sun No, Junyoung Kim, JeeEun Rhee, Myung-Guk Han, Gi-Eun Rhie, Cheon K
    Virus Evolution.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Short Communication
Detection of Novel Coronavirus on the Surface of Environmental Materials Contaminated by COVID-19 Patients in the Republic of Korea
Sang-Eun Lee, Deog-Yong Lee, Wook-Gyo Lee, ByeongHak Kang, Yoon Suk Jang, Boyeong Ryu, SeungJae Lee, Hyunjung Bahk, Eungyu Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2020;11(3):128-132.   Published online May 8, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2020.11.3.03
  • 6,600 View
  • 267 Download
  • 20 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

This study aimed to determine the presence of SARS-CoV-2 on surfaces frequently touched by COVID-19 patients, and assess the scope of contamination and transmissibility in facilities where the outbreaks occurred. In the course of this epidemiological investigation, a total of 80 environmental specimens were collected from 6 hospitals (68 specimens) and 2 “mass facilities” (6 specimens from a rehabilitation center and 6 specimens from an apartment building complex). Specific reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction targeting of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and envelope genes, were used to identify the presence of this novel coronavirus. The 68 specimens from 6 hospitals (A, B, C, D, E, and G), where prior disinfection/cleaning had been performed before environmental sampling, tested negative for SARS-CoV-2. However, 2 out of 12 specimens (16.7%) from 2 “mass facilities” (F and H), where prior disinfection/cleaning had not taken place, were positive for SARS-CoV-2 RNA polymerase, and envelope genes. These results suggest that prompt disinfection and cleaning of potentially contaminated surfaces is an effective infection control measure. By inactivating SARS-CoV-2 with disinfection/cleaning the infectivity and transmission of the virus is blocked. This investigation of environmental sampling may help in the understanding of risk assessment of the COVID-19 outbreak in “mass facilities” and provide guidance in using effective disinfectants on contaminated surfaces.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) research agenda for healthcare epidemiology
    Lona Mody, Ibukunoluwa C. Akinboyo, Hilary M. Babcock, Werner E. Bischoff, Vincent Chi-Chung Cheng, Kathleen Chiotos, Kimberly C. Claeys, K. C. Coffey, Daniel J. Diekema, Curtis J. Donskey, Katherine D. Ellingson, Heather M. Gilmartin, Shruti K. Gohil, An
    Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology.2022; 43(2): 156.     CrossRef
  • SARS-CoV-2 on Surfaces and HVAC Filters in Dormitory Rooms
    Jin Pan, Seth A. Hawks, Aaron J. Prussin, Nisha K. Duggal, Linsey C. Marr
    Environmental Science & Technology Letters.2022; 9(1): 71.     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 Cluster Linked to Aerosol Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 via Floor Drains
    Taewon Han, Heedo Park, Yungje Jeong, Jungmin Lee, Eungyeong Shon, Man-Seong Park, Minki Sung
    The Journal of Infectious Diseases.2022; 225(9): 1554.     CrossRef
  • Environmental Contamination with SARS-CoV-2 in Hospital COVID Department: Antigen Test, Real-Time RT-PCR and Virus Isolation
    Urška Rozman, Lea Knez, Goran Novak, Jernej Golob, Anita Pulko, Mojca Cimerman, Matjaž Ocepek, Urška Kuhar, Sonja Šostar Turk
    COVID.2022; 2(8): 1050.     CrossRef
  • Using Environmental Sampling to Enable Zoonotic Pandemic Preparedness
    Avirup Sanyal, Sanskriti Agarwal, Uma Ramakrishnan, Kritika M. Garg, Balaji Chattopadhyay
    Journal of the Indian Institute of Science.2022; 102(2): 711.     CrossRef
  • Anforderungen an die Hygiene bei der Reinigung und Desinfektion von Flächen

    Bundesgesundheitsblatt - Gesundheitsforschung - Ge.2022; 65(10): 1074.     CrossRef
  • SARS-CoV-2 pandemic: a review of molecular diagnostic tools including sample collection and commercial response with associated advantages and limitations
    Harikrishnan Jayamohan, Christopher J. Lambert, Himanshu J. Sant, Alexander Jafek, Dhruv Patel, Haidong Feng, Michael Beeman, Tawsif Mahmood, Ugochukwu Nze, Bruce K. Gale
    Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry.2021; 413(1): 49.     CrossRef
  • Contamination of inert surfaces by SARS-CoV-2: Persistence, stability and infectivity. A review
    Montse Marquès, José L. Domingo
    Environmental Research.2021; 193: 110559.     CrossRef
  • A Systematic Review of Surface Contamination, Stability, and Disinfection Data on SARS-CoV-2 (Through July 10, 2020)
    Noah Bedrosian, Elizabeth Mitchell, Elsa Rohm, Miguel Rothe, Christine Kelly, Gabrielle String, Daniele Lantagne
    Environmental Science & Technology.2021; 55(7): 4162.     CrossRef
  • Transmission of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 via Contaminated Surfaces: What Is to Be Done?
    Craig S Conover
    Clinical Infectious Diseases.2021; 72(11): 2062.     CrossRef
  • Investigation of SARS CoV-2 virus in environmental surface
    Abdollah Dargahi, Farhad Jeddi, Mehdi Vosoughi, Chiman Karami, Aidin Hadisi, S. Ahamad Mokhtari, Hasan Ghobadi, Morteza Alighadri, Somayeh Biparva Haghighi, Hadi Sadeghi
    Environmental Research.2021; 195: 110765.     CrossRef
  • Ist die Desinfektion öffentlicher Flächen zur Prävention von SARS-CoV-2 – infektionen sinnvoll?
    Günter Kampf, Lutz Jatzwauk
    Das Gesundheitswesen.2021; 83(03): 180.     CrossRef
  • SARS-CoV-2 Detection Rates from Surface Samples Do Not Implicate Public Surfaces as Relevant Sources for Transmission
    Günter Kampf, Stephanie Pfaender, Emanuel Goldman, Eike Steinmann
    Hygiene.2021; 1(1): 24.     CrossRef
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    European Journal of Epidemiology.2021; 36(7): 685.     CrossRef
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    Taewon Han, Boyeong Ryu, Suyeon Lee, Yugyeong Song, Yoongje Jeong, Ilhwan Kim, Jeongmin Kim, Eunjin Kim, Wonjun Lee, Hyunju Lee, Haekyoung Hwang
    One Health.2021; 13: 100328.     CrossRef
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    Infectious Diseases in Clinical Practice.2021; 29(6): e371.     CrossRef
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Original Articles
Army Soldiers’ Knowledge of, Attitude Towards, and Preventive Behavior Towards Tuberculosis in Korea
Yun Choi, Geum Hee Jeong
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2018;9(5):269-277.   Published online October 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2018.9.5.09
  • 5,027 View
  • 139 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The aim of this study was to gather information about Korean Army soldiers’ attitude towards tuberculosis to enable the development of an informed educational program and potential intervention plans.

Methods

There were 500 male soldiers serving in the Korean Army who responded to questionnaires regarding knowledge of, attitudes towards, and preventive behavior towards tuberculosis. The questionnaires were collected between September 10 until October 1, 2014. Participants’ characteristic that influenced differences in knowledge, attitudes, and preventive behavior towards tuberculosis were compared by t test. Variables that influenced preventive behavior were identified by multiple regression analysis.

Results

The mean scores assessing knowledge of, attitude, and preventive behavior towards tuberculosis were 11.64 (± 4.03) out of 20 points, 3.21 (± 0.38) out of 4 points, and 2.88 (± 0.42) out of 4 points, respectively. Non-smokers were more knowledgeable about tuberculosis than smokers. Participants who had family or friends with tuberculosis had better knowledge and a more productive attitude to tuberculosis. Participants who were educated or obtained information about tuberculosis, received better scores in all areas of knowledge, attitude and preventive behavior compared to other participants. Non-smoking, family or friends who have had tuberculosis, obtaining information about tuberculosis, and positive attitudes towards treatment and preventive education had an explanatory power of 24.6% with regard to preventive behavior against tuberculosis.

Conclusion

More relatable, systemized education should be provided regularly to improve soldiers’ knowledge of, attitudes towards, and prevention against tuberculosis in the Republic of Korea Army.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Knowledge, Attitudes, and Preventative Behavior Toward Tuberculosis in University Students in Indonesia
    Irma Melyani Puspitasari, Rano Kurnia Sinuraya, Arini Nurhaqiqi Aminudin, Rika Rahmi Kamilah
    Infection and Drug Resistance.2022; Volume 15: 4721.     CrossRef
  • Factors Affecting Preventive Behavior related to Tuberculosis among University Students in Korea: Focused on Knowledge, Attitude and Optimistic Bias related to Tuberculosis
    Myung Soon Kwon, Yun Choi
    Journal of Korean Academy of Fundamentals of Nursi.2020; 27(3): 236.     CrossRef
  • Assessment of knowledge, attitude and practice on tuberculosis among teacher trainees of Samtse College of Education, Bhutan
    Thinley Dorji, Tandin Tshering, Kinley Wangdi, Ritesh G. Menezes
    PLOS ONE.2020; 15(11): e0241923.     CrossRef
  • The Infectivity of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Korean Army Units: Evidence from Outbreak Investigations
    Chang-gyo Yoon, Dong Yoon Kang, Jaehun Jung, Soo Yon Oh, Jin Beom Lee, Mi-Hyun Kim, Younsuk Seo, Hee-Jin Kim
    Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases.2019; 82(4): 298.     CrossRef
Estimating the Incidence of Cases and Deaths Resulting from Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease and Its Related Socioeconomic Disease Burden in Republic of Korea (2010 – 2014)
Donghee Seo
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2018;9(3):112-117.   Published online June 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2018.9.3.05
  • 3,080 View
  • 59 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Hand, Foot and Mouth disease (HFMD) is a highly contagious viral disease that affects young children and frequently causes epidemics. A vaccine is available in China (enterovirus 71) and, the Republic of Korea took the first step to develop a new vaccine. New vaccine development requires that disease burden is calculated in advance so the financial cost, morbidity and mortality can be measured.

Methods

Data from National Sentinel Surveillance and health insurance systems of 1 million claimants were used. Direct medical and non-medical costs, indirect (caregiving and premature death) costs, cases and related deaths were summarized.

Results

From 2010 to 2014, there were an estimated 3,605 to 9,271 cases of HFMD, with 1 to 3 deaths. The estimated socioeconomic disease burden ranged from 80.5 to 164.2 million USD and was similar to that of hepatitis A (93.6–103.8 million USD). Among each costs, costs of caregiving consisted of highest proportion mainly due to hiring caregivers (50% – 60%) or opportunity costs from day off (62% – 69%).

Conclusion

Considering the social impact of HFMD, the estimated socioeconomic disease burden is not high and government policies need to focus on reducing the loss of work in caregivers.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Dynamical analysis for a reaction-diffusion HFMD model with nonsmooth saturation treatment function
    Lei Shi, Hongyong Zhao, Daiyong Wu
    Communications in Nonlinear Science and Numerical .2021; 95: 105593.     CrossRef
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    Hongyong Zhao, Lei Shi, Jing Wang, Kai Wang
    Applied Mathematical Modelling.2021; 93: 745.     CrossRef
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    Lei Shi, Hongyong Zhao, Daiyong Wu
    Advances in Difference Equations.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Scientific Reports.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Jiao-Jiao Zou, Gao-Feng Jiang, Xiao-Xu Xie, Juan Huang, Xiao-Bing Yang
    Medicine.2019; 98(6): e14195.     CrossRef
A Retrospective Mid- and Long-term Follow-up Study on the Changes in Hematologic Parameters in the Highly Exposed Residents of the Hebei Spirit Oil Spill in Taean, South Korea
Young-Hyun Choi, Jee-Young Hong, Moo-Sik Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2017;8(5):358-366.   Published online October 31, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2017.8.5.10
  • 2,782 View
  • 22 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study aimed to analyze changes in hematologic parameters in the residents of the areas highly contaminated by the Hebei Spirit Oil Spill in 2007 and those who participated in the clean-up activities.

Methods

According to demographic characteristics, health status and behavior, and level of exposure to oil, we compared the hematologic results in 2009 and 2012 among 701 residents. The hematologic parameters were composed of white blood cell (WBC) count, and levels of hemoglobin, hematocrit (Hct), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (Cr), total cholesterol (T-chol), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and triglyceride (TG).

Results

Paired t-test revealed that the WBC count and levels of Hct, AST, ALT, glucose, and HbA1c significantly increased, whereas the BUN, Cr, HDL, and TG levels significantly decreased. Multiple linear regression modelling showed a relationship between the level of exposure to oil and temporal changes in Hct, glucose, HbA1c, and BUN levels.

Conclusion

Our results suggest a relationship between level of exposure to oil and changes in hematologic parameters over 3 years. Further studies should be conducted to determine the impact of oil spill on health such as the occurrence of diseases.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Haematological, renal, and hepatic function changes among Rayong oil spill clean-up workers: a longitudinal study
    Benjamin Atta Owusu, Apiradee Lim, Chanthip Intawong, Sunthorn Rheanpumikankit, Saijit Suksri, Thammasin Ingviya
    International Archives of Occupational and Environ.2022; 95(7): 1481.     CrossRef
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    Hosna Moradkhani, Mostafa Leili, Jalal Puralajal, Ashraf Mazaheri Tehrani, Ayat Hossein Panahi, Mohammd Taghi Samadi, Sara Beheshtifar
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    Solomon E Owumi, Bidemi N Oladimeji, Tobiloba C Elebiyo, Uche O Arunsi
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    Sabit Cakmak, Christie Cole, Chris Hebbern, Julie Andrade, Robert Dales
    Environment International.2020; 145: 106121.     CrossRef
  • Developing Large-Scale Research in Response to an Oil Spill Disaster: a Case Study
    Richard K. Kwok, Aubrey K. Miller, Kaitlyn B. Gam, Matthew D. Curry, Steven K. Ramsey, Aaron Blair, Lawrence S. Engel, Dale P. Sandler
    Current Environmental Health Reports.2019; 6(3): 174.     CrossRef
H5N8 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza in the Republic of Korea: Epidemiology During the First Wave, from January Through July 2014
Hachung Yoon, Oun-Kyong Moon, Wooseog Jeong, Jida Choi, Young-Myong Kang, Hyo-Young Ahn, Jee-Hye Kim, Dae-Sung Yoo, Young-Jin Kwon, Woo-Seok Chang, Myeong-Soo Kim, Do-Soon Kim, Yong-Sang Kim, Yi-Seok Joo
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2015;6(2):106-111.   Published online April 30, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2015.01.005
  • 2,028 View
  • 24 Download
  • 12 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study describes the outbreaks of H5N8 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in Korea during the first wave, from January 16, 2014 through July 25, 2014. Its purpose is to provide a better understanding of the epidemiology of H5N8 HPAI.
Methods
Information on the outbreak farms and HPAI positive wild birds was provided by the Animal and Plant Quarantine Agency. The epidemiological investigation sheets for the outbreak farms were examined.
Results
During the 7-month outbreak period (January–July 2014), H5N8 HPAI was confirmed in 212 poultry farms, 38 specimens from wild birds (stools, birds found dead or captured). Ducks were the most frequently infected poultry species (159 outbreak farms, 75.0%), and poultry in 67 (31.6%) outbreak farms was asymptomatic.
Conclusion
As in the previous four H5N1 epidemics of HPAI that occurred in Korea, this epidemic of H5N8 proved to be associated with migratory birds. Poultry farms in Korea can hardly be free from the risk of HPAI introduced via migratory birds. The best way to overcome this geographical factor is to reinforce biosecurity to prevent exposure of farms, related people, and poultry to the pathogen.

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Assessment of Intensive Vaccination and Antiviral Treatment in 2009 Influenza Pandemic in Korea
Chaeshin Chu, Sunmi Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2015;6(1):47-51.   Published online February 28, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.11.007
  • 1,813 View
  • 16 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
We characterized and assessed public health measures, including intensive vaccination and antiviral treatment, implemented during the 2009 influenza pandemic in the Republic of Korea.
Methods
A mathematical model for the 2009 influenza pandemic is formulated. The transmission rate, the vaccination rate, the antiviral treatment rate, and the hospitalized rate are estimated using the least-squares method for the 2009 data of the incidence curves of the infected, vaccinated, treated, and hospitalized.
Results
The cumulative number of infected cases has reduced significantly following the implementation of the intensive vaccination and antiviral treatment. In particular, the intensive vaccination was the most critical factor that prevented severe outbreak.
Conclusion
We have found that the total infected proportion would increase by approximately six times under the half of vaccination rates.

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    Yunhwan Kim, Ana Vivas Barber, Sunmi Lee, Roberto Barrio
    PLOS ONE.2020; 15(6): e0232580.     CrossRef
  • Doing Mathematics with Aftermath of Pandemic Influenza 2009
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2015; 6(1): 1.     CrossRef
Assessment of the Intensive Countermeasures in the 2009 Pandemic Influenza in Korea
Jin Hyuk Choi, Yunhwan Kim, Seoyun Choe, Sunmi Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(2):101-107.   Published online April 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.03.003
  • 1,778 View
  • 17 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
It is critical to implement effective multiple countermeasures to mitigate or retain the spread of pandemic influenza. We propose a mathematical pandemic influenza model to assess the effectiveness of multiple countermeasures implemented in 2009.
Methods
Age-specific parameters, including the transmission rate, the proportion of asymptomatic individuals, the vaccination rate, the social distancing rate, and the antiviral treatment rate are estimated using the least-square method calibrated to the incidence data.
Results
The multiple interventions (intensive vaccination, social distancing, antivrial treatment) were successfully implemented resulting in the dramatic reduction in the total number of incidence.
Conclusion
The model output is sensitive to age-specific parameters and this leads to the fact that a more elaborate age group model should be developed and extensive further studies must be followed.
Articles
Prevalence of Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus in Ixodid Ticks Collected from the Republic of Korea During 2011–2012
Seok-Min Yun, Bong Gu Song, WooYoung Choi, Won Il Park, Sung Yun Kim, Jong Yul Roh, Jungsang Ryou, Young Ran Ju, Chan Park, E-Hyun Shin
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2012;3(4):213-221.   Published online December 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2012.10.004
  • 2,176 View
  • 24 Download
  • 26 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
In this study, we demonstrated that TBEV-infected ticks have been distributed in the ROK, combined with our previous results. These results suggest that TBEV may exist in the ROK, and H. longicornis, H. flava, and I. nipponensis may be potential vectors of TBEV. In addition, these results emphasize the need for further epidemiological research of TBEV.
Methods
We examined for the presence of RNA of TBEV by reverse transcriptase-nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-nested PCR) using ixodid ticks captured in 25 localities of 10 provinces. Ticks were collected by the flagging and dragging method or using sentinel BG traps at forests, grass thickets, and grassland. A total of 13,053 ticks belonging to two genera and four species were collected and pooled (1292 pools), according to collection site, species of tick, and developmental stage.
Results
Among 1292 pools, the envelope (E) protein gene of TBEV was detected using RT-nested PCR in 10 pools (3 pools of the 1,331 adult ticks and 7 pools of the 11,169 nymph ticks) collected from Gangwon-do province, Jeonrabuk-do province, and Jeju Island. The minimum infection rates for TBEV of Haemaphysalis longicornis, Haemaphysalis flava, and Ixodes nipponensis were 0.06%, 0.17%, and 2.38%, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis based on the partial E protein gene was performed to identify relationships between the TBEV strains. This showed that 10 Korean strains clustered with the Western subtype.
Conclusion
In this study, we investigated the prevalence of tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) in ixodid ticks from various regions of the Republic of Korea (ROK) during 2011–2012 to identify whether TBEV is circulating and to determine the endemic regions of TBEV.

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PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives