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2 "Pregnant women"
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Psychological outcomes of the COVID-19 pandemic among pregnant women in Indonesia: a cross-sectional study
Rahmah Hida Nurrizka, Yuri Nurdiantami, Feda Anisah Makkiyah
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(2):80-87.   Published online April 29, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.12.2.05
  • 3,154 View
  • 190 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The objective of this study was to analyze the psychological outcomes of pregnant women during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in several areas that are epicenters for the spread of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in Indonesia.
Methods
This cross-sectional study used data obtained from an online survey administered to 120 women who were pregnant and gave birth during the COVID-19 pandemic in Indonesia. The psychological condition of pregnant women was measured using the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale-21 questionnaire which was modified for conditions experienced during the COVID-19 pandemic. We classified pregnant women into 2 groups according to their psychological condition: pregnant women who experienced anxiety and pregnant women who did not experience anxiety or felt normal. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was undertaken for the 2 groups. This study also used univariate analysis and bivariate analysis.
Results
The results of the ROC analysis resulted in a cutoff score of 3.56. The proportion of respondents who felt anxious was 53.3% and the proportion of respondents who did not feel anxious or felt normal was 46.7%. Anxiety was most common among pregnant women with high education levels, gestational age <19 weeks, and working pregnant women.
Conclusion
Maternal health services need to be performed with strict health protocols, complemented by pregnancy counseling services. This will provide a feeling of comfort and safety as pregnant women receive health services and give birth.
Gender-based Violence Among Pregnant Women of Syangja District, Nepal
Samjhana Gurung, Jeevan Acharya
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2016;7(2):101-107.   Published online April 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2015.11.010
  • 1,565 View
  • 17 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study aims to determine prevalence of gender-based violence among pregnant women attending an antenatal care (ANC) clinic.
Methods
Between September 2014 and December 2014, a cross-sectional study was conducted among 202 pregnant women attending the antenatal ward of the Primary Healthcare Centre (PHC) of Syangja district, Nepal. The data were collected using semistructure questionnaires with face-to-face interviews. SPSS software (IBM Corp, Armonk, NY, USA) was used for analysis the data.
Results
The prevalence rate of gender-based violence was found to be 91.1% (184). Most of the respondents (87%) faced economic violence followed by psychological (53.8%), sexual (41.8%), and physical (4.3%) violence. Women experienced: (1) psychological violence with most complaining of angry looks followed by jealousy or anger while talking with other men, insults using abusive language and neglect; (2) economic violence with most complaining of financial hardship, denial of basic needs and an insistence on knowing where respondents were and restricting them to parents' home or friends/relatives' houses (jealousy); (3) physical violence by slapping, pushing, shaking, or throwing something at her, twisting arm or pulling hair, and punching and kicking; and (4) sexual violence by physically forcing her to have sexual intercourse without consent, and hurting or causing injury to private parts. Most (100%) of the perpetrators were found to be husbands and mothers-in-law (10.7%) who violated them rarely.
Conclusion
The prevalence of gender-based violence (GBV) among pregnant women attending the ANC clinic was greater in the Syangja district of Nepal. Women's empowerment, economic autonomy, sensitization, informal or formal training regarding GBV for men and women, and the need for large-scale population-based surveys are the major recommendations of this study.

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives