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PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives

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Phylogenetic and genome-wide mutational analysis of SARS-CoV-2 strains circulating in Nigeria: no implications for attenuated COVID-19 outcomes
Daniel B. Kolawole, Malachy I. Okeke
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2022;13(2):101-113.   Published online April 22, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0329
  • 1,298 View
  • 45 Download
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the causative agent of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The COVID-19 incidence and mortality rates are low in Nigeria compared to global trends. This research mapped the evolution of SARS-CoV-2 circulating in Nigeria and globally to determine whether the Nigerian isolates are genetically distinct from strains circulating in regions of the world with a high disease burden. Methods: Bayesian phylogenetics using BEAST 2.0, genetic similarity analyses, and genomewide mutational analyses were used to characterize the strains of SARS-CoV-2 isolated in Nigeria. Results: SARS-CoV-2 strains isolated in Nigeria showed multiple lineages and possible introductions from Europe and Asia. Phylogenetic clustering and sequence similarity analyses demonstrated that Nigerian isolates were not genetically distinct from strains isolated in other parts of the globe. Mutational analysis demonstrated that the D614G mutation in the spike protein, the P323L mutation in open reading frame 1b (and more specifically in NSP12), and the R203K/ G204R mutation pair in the nucleocapsid protein were most prevalent in the Nigerian isolates. Conclusion: The SARS-CoV-2 strains in Nigeria were neither phylogenetically nor genetically distinct from virus strains circulating in other countries of the world. Thus, differences in SARS-CoV-2 genomes are not a plausible explanation for the attenuated COVID-19 outcomes in Nigeria.
Perceptions of the COVID-19 vaccine and willingness to receive vaccination among health workers in Nigeria
Oluseyi Ademola Adejumo, Olorunfemi Akinbode Ogundele, Cynthia Roli Madubuko, Rosena Olubanke Oluwafemi, Ogochukwu Chinedum Okoye, Kenechukwu Chukwuemeka Okonkwo, Sunday Samson Owolade, Oladimeji Adedeji Junaid, Olutoyin Morenike Lawal, Adenike Christianah Enikuomehin, Maureen Iru Ntaji, Aisha Sokunbi, Aina Omodele Timothy, Olatunji Sunday Abolarin, Emmanuel Olalekan Ali, John Oghenevwirhe Ohaju-Obodo
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(4):236-243.   Published online July 19, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0023
  • 6,327 View
  • 386 Download
  • 15 Citations
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The study aimed to examine health workers’ perceptions of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine in Nigeria and their willingness to receive the vaccine when it becomes available.
Methods
This multi-center cross-sectional study used non-probability convenience sampling to enroll 1,470 hospital workers aged 18 and above from 4 specialized hospitals. A structured and validated self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. Data entry and analysis were conducted using IBM SPSS ver. 22.0.
Results
The mean age of respondents was 40±6 years. Only 53.5% of the health workers had positive perceptions of the COVID-19 vaccine, and only slightly more than half (55.5%) were willing to receive vaccination. Predictors of willingness to receive the COVID-19 vaccine included having a positive perception of the vaccine (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 4.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.50−5.69), perceiving a risk of contracting COVID-19 (AOR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.25–3.98), having received tertiary education (AOR, 3.50; 95% CI, 1.40−6.86), and being a clinical health worker (AOR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.01−1.68).
Conclusion
Perceptions of the COVID-19 vaccine and willingness to receive the vaccine were sub-optimal among this group. Educational interventions to improve health workers' perceptions and attitudes toward the COVID-19 vaccine are needed.
Modeling the Spread of Ebola
Tae Sug Do, Young S. Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2016;7(1):43-48.   Published online February 28, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2015.12.012
  • 1,750 View
  • 17 Download
  • 12 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study aims to create a mathematical model to better understand the spread of Ebola, the mathematical dynamics of the disease, and preventative behaviors.
Methods
An epidemiological model is created with a system of nonlinear differential equations, and the model examines the disease transmission dynamics with isolation through stability analysis. All parameters are approximated, and results are also exploited by simulations. Sensitivity analysis is used to discuss the effect of intervention strategies.
Results
The system has only one equilibrium point, which is the disease-free state (S,L,I,R,D) = (N,0,0,0,0). If traditional burials of Ebola victims are allowed, the possible end state is never stable. Provided that safe burial practices with no traditional rituals are followed, the endemic-free state is stable if the basic reproductive number, R0, is less than 1. Model behaviors correspond to empirical facts. The model simulation agrees with the data of the Nigeria outbreak in 2004: 12 recoveries, eight deaths, Ebola free in about 3 months, and an R0 value of about 2.6 initially, which signifies swift spread of the infection. The best way to reduce R0 is achieving the speedy net effect of intervention strategies. One day's delay in full compliance with building rings around the virus with isolation, close observation, and clear education may double the number of infected cases.
Conclusion
The model can predict the total number of infected cases, number of deaths, and duration of outbreaks among others. The model can be used to better understand the spread of Ebola, educate about prophylactic behaviors, and develop strategies that alter environment to achieve a disease-free state. A future work is to incorporate vaccination in the model when the vaccines are developed and the effects of vaccines are known better.

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives