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Original Articles
Investigation of SARS-CoV-2 lineages and mutations circulating in a university-affiliated hospital in South Korea analyzed using Oxford Nanopore MinION sequencing
Hyaekang Kim, Sung Hee Chung, Hyun Soo Kim, Han-Sung Kim, Wonkeun Song, Ki Ho Hong, Jae-Seok Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2022;13(5):360-369.   Published online October 11, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2022.0183
  • 598 View
  • 46 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
Despite the introduction of vaccines, treatments, and massive diagnostic testing, the evolution of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has continued to overcome barriers that had slowed its previous spread. As the virus evolves towards increasing fitness, it is critical to continue monitoring the occurrence of new mutations that could evade human efforts to control them. Methods: We performed whole-genome sequencing using Oxford Nanopore MinION sequencing on 58 SARS-CoV-2 isolates collected during the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic at a tertiary hospital in South Korea and tracked the emergence of mutations responsible for massive spikes in South Korea. Results: The differences among lineages were more pronounced in the spike gene, especially in the receptor-binding domain (RBD), than in other genes. Those RBD mutations could compromise neutralization by antibodies elicited by vaccination or previous infections. We also reported multiple incidences of Omicron variants carrying mutations that could impair the diagnostic sensitivity of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction-based testing. Conclusion: These results provide an understanding of the temporal changes of variants and mutations that have been circulating in South Korea and their potential impacts on antigenicity, therapeutics, and diagnostic escape of the virus. We also showed that the utilization of the nanopore sequencing platform and the ARTIC workf low can provide convenient and accurate SARS-CoV-2 genomic surveillance even at a single hospital.
Neck circumference and incidence of cerebrovascular disease over 12 years among Korean adults
Jae-Seon Han, Yun-Hee Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2022;13(1):71-79.   Published online February 8, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0277
  • 1,497 View
  • 40 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Neck circumference is associated with a distinctive fat storage process that confers additional metabolic risk. Hence, this study aimed to investigate the correlation between baseline neck circumference and the incidence of cerebrovascular disease using a prospective community-based sample of Korean adults over 12 years of follow-up, after controlling for selected covariates. Methods: Participants with non-cerebrovascular disease were divided into 4 groups (Q1–Q4) based on their baseline neck circumference. Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to evaluate the relationship between neck circumference and cerebrovascular disease incidence over a 12-year period. Results: Among this study’s 3,662 participants, 128 (3.50%) developed cerebrovascular disease. The incidence of cerebrovascular disease increased from 2.2% in Q1 to 4.3% in Q2, 2.5% in Q3, and 5.0% in Q4. When compared to Q1, the relative risks of cerebrovascular disease development were 0.57 (95% CI, 0.25–1.31), 0.86 (95% CI, 0.38–1.96), and 0.79 (95% CI, 0.30–2.07) in man and 1.86 (95% CI, 0.66–5.20), 3.50 (95% CI, 1.25–9.86), and 4.71 (95% CI, 1.50–14.77) in woman in Q2, Q3, and Q4, respectively, after adjusting for most risk factors related to cerebrovascular disease. Conclusion: The relationship between neck circumference and cerebrovascular disease was stronger in woman than in man, indicating potential differences between the sexes. These results are meaningful for evaluating and surveilling neck circumference as a promising tool for identifying subgroups of vulnerable and at-risk populations.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The association of Carbohydrate Quality Index with cardiovascular disease risk factors among women with overweight and obesity: A cross-sectional study
    Darya Khosravinia, Farideh Shiraseb, Atieh Mirzababaei, Elnaz Daneshzad, Shahin Jamili, Cain C. T. Clark, Khadijeh Mirzaei
    Frontiers in Nutrition.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Laboratory investigations of herpes simplex virus-1 and -2 clinical samples in Korea
Eun Ju Oh, Young Sam Yuk, Jae Kyung Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(6):385-389.   Published online December 1, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0146
  • 2,776 View
  • 55 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections have been reported in 60% to 95% of the adult population worldwide, making them one of the most common infectious conditions globally. HSV-1 and HSV-2 cause severe disease in immunocompromised patients. Therefore, the aim of this study was to provide information that could be used to reduce the incidence of genital herpes caused by HSV-1 and HSV-2.
Methods
From September 2018 to December 2020, 59,381 specimens were collected from outpatients across primary and secondary hospitals in Korea who requested U2Bio (Seoul, Korea) to conduct molecular biological testing of their samples for sexually transmitted infections. In this study, the positivity rates of HSV-1 and HSV-2 were analyzed according to age, sex, and specimen type.
Results
In the age-specific analysis of HSV-1, the highest positivity rate (0.58%) was observed in patients under 19 years of age, whereas the lowest positivity rate (0.08%) was observed in patients aged over 70 years. In the age-specific analysis of HSV-2, the highest positivity rate (2.53%) was likewise observed in patients under 19 years of age.
Conclusion
Our study identified differences in the infection rates of HSV-1 and HSV-2 depending on patients’ sex and age. These differences will be useful for improving disease prevention and control measures for HSV-1 and HSV-2.
Trends in recent waterborne and foodborne disease outbreaks in South Korea, 2015–2019
Sang Hyuk Lee, Jae-Won Yun, Ji Hee Lee, Yeon Haw Jung, Dong Han Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(2):73-79.   Published online April 29, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.12.2.04
  • 3,880 View
  • 128 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study analyzed trends in foodborne and waterborne diseases in South Korea between 2015 and 2019.
Methods
The data consisted of information on outbreaks of waterborne and foodborne infectious diseases reported through the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC) system. We analyzed the trends and epidemiological aspects of outbreaks by month, place of occurrence, and causative pathogens in this observational study.
Results
The number of outbreaks has steadily increased over the last 5 years, but the number of cases per outbreak has followed a decreasing trend. Incidence at daycare centers and preschools has been steadily increasing over consecutive years.
Conclusion
The steady number of patients and decreasing number of cases per outbreak, even as the number of outbreaks has been increasing, suggest that the KCDC’s professional management system is operating effectively. It is necessary to continue improving the objectivity and efficiency of the management system and to carefully examine the increasing number of outbreaks in smaller-scale group catering facilities, such as daycare centers and preschools. Outbreaks can be prevented by closely examining those caused by unidentified pathogens and group outbreaks caused by other diseases, identifying problems, and supplementing the management system.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Survival of murine norovirus and hepatitis A virus in bottled drinking water, strawberries, and oysters
    Ziwei Zhao, Md Iqbal Hossain, Soontag Jung, Zhaoqi Wang, Daseul Yeo, Mengxiao Song, Ae Min, Sunho Park, Changsun Choi
    Food Control.2022; 133: 108623.     CrossRef
  • Trends in gastrointestinal infections before and during non-pharmaceutical interventions in Korea in comparison with the United States
    Soyeoun Kim, Jinhyun Kim, Bo Youl Choi, Boyoung Park
    Epidemiology and Health.2022; 44: e2022011.     CrossRef
  • Molecular Identification of Bacillus Isolated from Korean Water Deer (Hydropotes inermis argyropus) and Striped Field Mouse (Apodemus agrarius) Feces by Using an SNP-Based 16S Ribosomal Marker
    Md-Mafizur Rahman, Sang-Jin Lim, Yung-Chul Park
    Animals.2022; 12(8): 979.     CrossRef
  • Trends in Acute Gastroenteritis through the Pathogen Surveillance System in Incheon Metropolitan City, 2018-2021
    Jung Hee Kim, Sung Min Song, Ju Hee Kim, Soo Min Lim, Su Jin Park, Hwa Jung Nam, Young Woo Gong, Mun Ju Kwon
    Journal of Bacteriology and Virology.2022; 52(2): 54.     CrossRef
Brief Report
Genomic Surveillance of SARS-CoV-2: Distribution of Clades in the Republic of Korea in 2020
Ae Kyung Park, Il-Hwan Kim, Junyoung Kim, Jeong-Min Kim, Heui Man Kim, Chae young Lee, Myung-Guk Han, Gi-Eun Rhie, Donghyok Kwon, Jeong-Gu Nam, Young-Joon Park, Jin Gwack, Nam-Joo Lee, SangHee Woo, Jin Sun No, Jaehee Lee, Jeemin Ha, JeeEun Rhee, Cheon-Kwon Yoo, Eun-Jin Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(1):37-43.   Published online February 23, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.12.1.06
  • 4,759 View
  • 188 Download
  • 16 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Since a novel beta-coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) was first reported in December 2019, there has been a rapid global spread of the virus. Genomic surveillance was conducted on samples isolated from infected individuals to monitor the spread of genetic variants of SARS-CoV-2 in Korea. The Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency performed whole genome sequencing of SARS-CoV-2 in Korea for 1 year (January 2020 to January 2021). A total of 2,488 SARS-CoV-2 cases were sequenced (including 648 cases from abroad). Initially, the prevalent clades of SARS-CoV-2 were the S and V clades, however, by March 2020, GH clade was the most dominant. Only international travelers were identified as having G or GR clades, and since the first variant 501Y.V1 was identified (from a traveler from the United Kingdom on December 22nd, 2020), a total of 27 variants of 501Y.V1, 501Y.V2, and 484K.V2 have been classified (as of January 25th, 2021). The results in this study indicated that quarantining of travelers entering Korea successfully prevented dissemination of the SARS-CoV-2 variants in Korea.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Rapid Emergence of the Omicron Variant of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 in Korea
    Ae Kyung Park, Il-Hwan Kim, Chae Young Lee, Jeong-Ah Kim, Hyeokjin Lee, Heui Man Kim, Nam-Joo Lee, SangHee Woo, Jaehee Lee, JeeEun Rhee, Cheon-Kwon Yoo, Eun-Jin Kim
    Annals of Laboratory Medicine.2023; 43(2): 211.     CrossRef
  • Genomic evidence of SARS‐CoV‐2 reinfection in the Republic of Korea
    Ae Kyung Park, Jee Eun Rhee, Il‐Hwan Kim, Heui Man Kim, Hyeokjin Lee, Jeong‐Ah Kim, Chae Young Lee, Nam‐Joo Lee, SangHee Woo, Jaehee Lee, Jin Sun No, Gi‐Eun Rhie, Seong Jin Wang, Sang‐Eun Lee, Young Joon Park, Gemma Park, Jung Yeon Kim, Jin Gwack, Cheon‐K
    Journal of Medical Virology.2022; 94(4): 1717.     CrossRef
  • SARS-CoV-2 B.1.619 and B.1.620 Lineages, South Korea, 2021
    Ae Kyung Park, Il-Hwan Kim, Heui Man Kim, Hyeokjin Lee, Nam-Joo Lee, Jeong-Ah Kim, SangHee Woo, Chae young Lee, Jaehee Lee, Sae Jin Oh, JeeEun Rhee, Cheon-Kwon Yoo, Eun-Jin Kim
    Emerging Infectious Diseases.2022; 28(2): 415.     CrossRef
  • Humoral and Cellular Responses to COVID-19 Vaccines in SARS-CoV-2 Infection-Naïve and -Recovered Korean Individuals
    Ji-Young Hwang, Yunhwa Kim, Kyung-Min Lee, Eun-Jeong Jang, Chang-Hoon Woo, Chang-Ui Hong, Seok-Tae Choi, Sivilay Xayaheuang, Jong-Geol Jang, June-Hong Ahn, Hosun Park
    Vaccines.2022; 10(2): 332.     CrossRef
  • Increase in Viral Load in Patients With SARS-CoV-2 Delta Variant Infection in the Republic of Korea
    Jeong-Min Kim, Jee Eun Rhee, Myeongsu Yoo, Heui Man Kim, Nam-Joo Lee, Sang Hee Woo, Hye-Jun Jo, Donghyok Kwon, Sangwon Lee, Cheon Kwon Yoo, Eun-Jin Kim
    Frontiers in Microbiology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Molecular Dynamics Studies on the Structural Stability Prediction of SARS-CoV-2 Variants Including Multiple Mutants
    Kwang-Eun Choi, Jeong-Min Kim, Jee Eun Rhee, Ae Kyung Park, Eun-Jin Kim, Cheon Kwon Yoo, Nam Sook Kang
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2022; 23(9): 4956.     CrossRef
  • SARS-CoV-2 shedding dynamics and transmission in immunosuppressed patients
    Jee-Soo Lee, Ki Wook Yun, Hyeonju Jeong, Boram Kim, Man Jin Kim, Jae Hyeon Park, Ho Seob Shin, Hyeon Sae Oh, Hobin Sung, Myung Gi Song, Sung Im Cho, So Yeon Kim, Chang Kyung Kang, Pyoeng Gyun Choe, Wan Beom Park, Nam Joong Kim, Myoung-Don Oh, Eun Hwa Choi
    Virulence.2022; 13(1): 1242.     CrossRef
  • Immunological and Pathological Peculiarity of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 Beta Variant
    Sunhee Lee, Gun Young Yoon, Su Jin Lee, Young-Chan Kwon, Hyun Woo Moon, Yu-Jin Kim, Haesoo Kim, Wooseong Lee, Gi Uk Jeong, Chonsaeng Kim, Kyun-Do Kim, Seong-Jun Kim, Dae-Gyun Ahn, Miguel Angel Martinez
    Microbiology Spectrum.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Clinical scoring system to predict viable viral shedding in patients with COVID-19
    Sung Woon Kang, Heedo Park, Ji Yeun Kim, Sunghee Park, So Yun Lim, Sohyun Lee, Joon-Yong Bae, Jeonghun Kim, Seongman Bae, Jiwon Jung, Min Jae Kim, Yong Pil Chong, Sang-Oh Lee, Sang-Ho Choi, Yang Soo Kim, Sung-Cheol Yun, Man-Seong Park, Sung-Han Kim
    Journal of Clinical Virology.2022; 157: 105319.     CrossRef
  • Model-informed COVID-19 exit strategy with projections of SARS-CoV-2 infections generated by variants in the Republic of Korea
    Sung-mok Jung, Kyungmin Huh, Munkhzul Radnaabaatar, Jaehun Jung
    BMC Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Comparative analysis of mutational hotspots in the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 isolates from different geographic origins
    Sanghoo Lee, Mi-Kyeong Lee, Hyeongkyun Na, Jinwoo Ahn, Gayeon Hong, Youngkee Lee, Jimyeong Park, Yejin Kim, Yun-Tae Kim, Chang-Ki Kim, Hwan-Sub Lim, Kyoung-Ryul Lee
    Gene Reports.2021; 23: 101100.     CrossRef
  • Review of Current COVID-19 Diagnostics and Opportunities for Further Development
    Yan Mardian, Herman Kosasih, Muhammad Karyana, Aaron Neal, Chuen-Yen Lau
    Frontiers in Medicine.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Locally harvested Covid-19 convalescent plasma could probably help combat the geographically determined SARS-CoV-2 viral variants
    Manish Raturi, Anuradha Kusum, Mansi Kala, Garima Mittal, Anita Sharma, Naveen Bansal
    Transfusion Clinique et Biologique.2021; 28(3): 300.     CrossRef
  • Molecular Dynamics Studies on the Structural Characteristics for the Stability Prediction of SARS-CoV-2
    Kwang-Eun Choi, Jeong-Min Kim, JeeEun Rhee, Ae Kyung Park, Eun-Jin Kim, Nam Sook Kang
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2021; 22(16): 8714.     CrossRef
  • Management following the first confirmed case of SARS-CoV-2 in a domestic cat associated with a massive outbreak in South Korea
    Taewon Han, Boyeong Ryu, Suyeon Lee, Yugyeong Song, Yoongje Jeong, Ilhwan Kim, Jeongmin Kim, Eunjin Kim, Wonjun Lee, Hyunju Lee, Haekyoung Hwang
    One Health.2021; 13: 100328.     CrossRef
  • Genomic epidemiology reveals the reduction of the introduction and spread of SARS-CoV-2 after implementing control strategies in Republic of Korea, 2020
    Jung-Hoon Kwon, Jeong-Min Kim, Dong-hun Lee, Ae Kyung Park, Il-Hwan Kim, Da-Won Kim, Ji-Yun Kim, Noori Lim, Kyeong-Yeon Cho, Heui Man Kim, Nam-Joo Lee, SangHee Woo, Chae Young Lee, Jin Sun No, Junyoung Kim, JeeEun Rhee, Myung-Guk Han, Gi-Eun Rhie, Cheon K
    Virus Evolution.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Original Article
Predictors Affecting the Elderly’s Use of Emergency Medical Services
Ju Moon Park, Aeree Sohn
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2020;11(4):209-215.   Published online August 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2020.11.4.10
  • 3,176 View
  • 60 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Elderly adults are the demographic most likely to utilize emergency medical services (EMS). This study aimed to examine the difference in EMS utilization in subgroups of the elderly population by assessing the predictors for using EMS.

Methods

Using both descriptive and logistic regression analyses, this study analyses data from the 2014 Korean Health Panel Survey (n = 3,175).

Results

It was observed that certain predisposing factors such as age, sex, and marital status were significant predictors of EMS utilization. However, differences in EMS need do not fully account for the original differences observed between subgroups of elderly Koreans. While health status and disability were important predictors of elderly Koreans using EMS, place of residence did not account for subgroup differences. Nonetheless, place of residence remained particularly important predictors of EMS utilization for the elderly.

Conclusion

Emergency needs and resource availability are 2 main determinants for elderly Koreans using EMS. In addition, it was observed that the demographic subgroup profile of unmarried/divorced/separated/widowed men who were aged 75 and older was least likely to utilize EMS. Improving their resource availability to meet their EMS needs should be a top priority for national policy making to narrow elderly population subgroup differences.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Social Factors Contributing to Healthcare Service Requirements during the First COVID-19 Lockdown among Older Adults
    Ohad Shaked, Liat Korn, Yair Shapiro, Avi Zigdon
    Healthcare.2022; 10(10): 1854.     CrossRef
Short Communication
Detection of Novel Coronavirus on the Surface of Environmental Materials Contaminated by COVID-19 Patients in the Republic of Korea
Sang-Eun Lee, Deog-Yong Lee, Wook-Gyo Lee, ByeongHak Kang, Yoon Suk Jang, Boyeong Ryu, SeungJae Lee, Hyunjung Bahk, Eungyu Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2020;11(3):128-132.   Published online May 8, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2020.11.3.03
  • 6,579 View
  • 267 Download
  • 20 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

This study aimed to determine the presence of SARS-CoV-2 on surfaces frequently touched by COVID-19 patients, and assess the scope of contamination and transmissibility in facilities where the outbreaks occurred. In the course of this epidemiological investigation, a total of 80 environmental specimens were collected from 6 hospitals (68 specimens) and 2 “mass facilities” (6 specimens from a rehabilitation center and 6 specimens from an apartment building complex). Specific reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction targeting of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and envelope genes, were used to identify the presence of this novel coronavirus. The 68 specimens from 6 hospitals (A, B, C, D, E, and G), where prior disinfection/cleaning had been performed before environmental sampling, tested negative for SARS-CoV-2. However, 2 out of 12 specimens (16.7%) from 2 “mass facilities” (F and H), where prior disinfection/cleaning had not taken place, were positive for SARS-CoV-2 RNA polymerase, and envelope genes. These results suggest that prompt disinfection and cleaning of potentially contaminated surfaces is an effective infection control measure. By inactivating SARS-CoV-2 with disinfection/cleaning the infectivity and transmission of the virus is blocked. This investigation of environmental sampling may help in the understanding of risk assessment of the COVID-19 outbreak in “mass facilities” and provide guidance in using effective disinfectants on contaminated surfaces.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) research agenda for healthcare epidemiology
    Lona Mody, Ibukunoluwa C. Akinboyo, Hilary M. Babcock, Werner E. Bischoff, Vincent Chi-Chung Cheng, Kathleen Chiotos, Kimberly C. Claeys, K. C. Coffey, Daniel J. Diekema, Curtis J. Donskey, Katherine D. Ellingson, Heather M. Gilmartin, Shruti K. Gohil, An
    Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology.2022; 43(2): 156.     CrossRef
  • SARS-CoV-2 on Surfaces and HVAC Filters in Dormitory Rooms
    Jin Pan, Seth A. Hawks, Aaron J. Prussin, Nisha K. Duggal, Linsey C. Marr
    Environmental Science & Technology Letters.2022; 9(1): 71.     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 Cluster Linked to Aerosol Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 via Floor Drains
    Taewon Han, Heedo Park, Yungje Jeong, Jungmin Lee, Eungyeong Shon, Man-Seong Park, Minki Sung
    The Journal of Infectious Diseases.2022; 225(9): 1554.     CrossRef
  • Environmental Contamination with SARS-CoV-2 in Hospital COVID Department: Antigen Test, Real-Time RT-PCR and Virus Isolation
    Urška Rozman, Lea Knez, Goran Novak, Jernej Golob, Anita Pulko, Mojca Cimerman, Matjaž Ocepek, Urška Kuhar, Sonja Šostar Turk
    COVID.2022; 2(8): 1050.     CrossRef
  • Using Environmental Sampling to Enable Zoonotic Pandemic Preparedness
    Avirup Sanyal, Sanskriti Agarwal, Uma Ramakrishnan, Kritika M. Garg, Balaji Chattopadhyay
    Journal of the Indian Institute of Science.2022; 102(2): 711.     CrossRef
  • Anforderungen an die Hygiene bei der Reinigung und Desinfektion von Flächen

    Bundesgesundheitsblatt - Gesundheitsforschung - Ge.2022; 65(10): 1074.     CrossRef
  • SARS-CoV-2 pandemic: a review of molecular diagnostic tools including sample collection and commercial response with associated advantages and limitations
    Harikrishnan Jayamohan, Christopher J. Lambert, Himanshu J. Sant, Alexander Jafek, Dhruv Patel, Haidong Feng, Michael Beeman, Tawsif Mahmood, Ugochukwu Nze, Bruce K. Gale
    Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry.2021; 413(1): 49.     CrossRef
  • Contamination of inert surfaces by SARS-CoV-2: Persistence, stability and infectivity. A review
    Montse Marquès, José L. Domingo
    Environmental Research.2021; 193: 110559.     CrossRef
  • A Systematic Review of Surface Contamination, Stability, and Disinfection Data on SARS-CoV-2 (Through July 10, 2020)
    Noah Bedrosian, Elizabeth Mitchell, Elsa Rohm, Miguel Rothe, Christine Kelly, Gabrielle String, Daniele Lantagne
    Environmental Science & Technology.2021; 55(7): 4162.     CrossRef
  • Transmission of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 via Contaminated Surfaces: What Is to Be Done?
    Craig S Conover
    Clinical Infectious Diseases.2021; 72(11): 2062.     CrossRef
  • Investigation of SARS CoV-2 virus in environmental surface
    Abdollah Dargahi, Farhad Jeddi, Mehdi Vosoughi, Chiman Karami, Aidin Hadisi, S. Ahamad Mokhtari, Hasan Ghobadi, Morteza Alighadri, Somayeh Biparva Haghighi, Hadi Sadeghi
    Environmental Research.2021; 195: 110765.     CrossRef
  • Ist die Desinfektion öffentlicher Flächen zur Prävention von SARS-CoV-2 – infektionen sinnvoll?
    Günter Kampf, Lutz Jatzwauk
    Das Gesundheitswesen.2021; 83(03): 180.     CrossRef
  • SARS-CoV-2 Detection Rates from Surface Samples Do Not Implicate Public Surfaces as Relevant Sources for Transmission
    Günter Kampf, Stephanie Pfaender, Emanuel Goldman, Eike Steinmann
    Hygiene.2021; 1(1): 24.     CrossRef
  • The SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic in hospital: An insight into environmental surfaces contamination, disinfectants’ efficiency, and estimation of plastic waste production
    Faezeh seif, Zahra Noorimotlagh, Seyyed Abbas Mirzaee, Mojtaba Kalantar, Barat Barati, Mahdi Emamian Fard, Nozar Kalantar Fard
    Environmental Research.2021; 202: 111809.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 RNA on inanimate surfaces: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Simone Belluco, Marzia Mancin, Filippo Marzoli, Alessio Bortolami, Eva Mazzetto, Alessandra Pezzuto, Michela Favretti, Calogero Terregino, Francesco Bonfante, Roberto Piro
    European Journal of Epidemiology.2021; 36(7): 685.     CrossRef
  • Management following the first confirmed case of SARS-CoV-2 in a domestic cat associated with a massive outbreak in South Korea
    Taewon Han, Boyeong Ryu, Suyeon Lee, Yugyeong Song, Yoongje Jeong, Ilhwan Kim, Jeongmin Kim, Eunjin Kim, Wonjun Lee, Hyunju Lee, Haekyoung Hwang
    One Health.2021; 13: 100328.     CrossRef
  • Non-Respiratory Droplet Transmission of COVID-19 in the Isolation Ward of a Secondary Hospital in Oman
    Zayid K. Al Mayahi, Nawal Al Kindi, Nasser Al Shaqsi, Noaman Al Hattali, Azza Al Hattali, Khalid Salim, Mark Beatty
    Infectious Diseases in Clinical Practice.2021; 29(6): e371.     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of antiviral metal and metal oxide thin-film coatings against human coronavirus 229E
    Louis-Vincent Delumeau, Hatameh Asgarimoghaddam, Tamiru Alkie, Alexander James Bryan Jones, Samantha Lum, Kissan Mistry, Marc G. Aucoin, Stephanie DeWitte-Orr, Kevin P. Musselman
    APL Materials.2021; 9(11): 111114.     CrossRef
  • Rapid Review of SARS-CoV-1 and SARS-CoV-2 Viability, Susceptibility to Treatment, and the Disinfection and Reuse of PPE, Particularly Filtering Facepiece Respirators
    José G. B. Derraik, William A. Anderson, Elizabeth A. Connelly, Yvonne C. Anderson
    International Journal of Environmental Research an.2020; 17(17): 6117.     CrossRef
  • Potential sources, modes of transmission and effectiveness of prevention measures against SARS-CoV-2
    G. Kampf, Y. Brüggemann, H.E.J. Kaba, J. Steinmann, S. Pfaender, S. Scheithauer, E. Steinmann
    Journal of Hospital Infection.2020; 106(4): 678.     CrossRef
Original Articles
The Association Between Lung Function and Type 2 Diabetes in Koreans
Do-Youn Lee, Seung-min Nam
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2020;11(1):27-33.   Published online February 28, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2020.11.1.05
  • 3,454 View
  • 112 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study was performed to test the association between lung function and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Korean patients.

Methods

Data from the 6th Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2013 to 2015) was used in this study. There were 3,466 individuals aged between 40 and 80 years, with T2DM, who had a smoking and alcohol status listed, and blood analysis (including blood pressure), were included in this study. Lung function, measured by spirometer ventilatory dysfunction was categorized into 3 patterns: normal, restrictive ventilatory dysfunction, and obstructive ventilatory dysfunction (OVD).

Results

Based on multivariate logistic regression analysis, individuals with restrictive ventilatory dysfunction had an increased odds ratio (OR 1.615, 95% CI 1.137–2.294) for T2DM compared with individuals with normal ventilatory function, whereas OVD had no increase in the odds ratio (OR 1.169, 95 % CI 0.857–1.594). Model 1, which adjusted for age and gender, showed that the probability of having restrictive disorder was 1.559 times (95% CI 1.617–2.082) higher for prediabetes patients, and 2.320 times (95% CI 1.611–3.343) higher for T2DM patients, compared to normal individuals. For Model 4, which was fully adjusted for variables, the probability of having a restrictive disorder was 1.837 times higher for T2DM patients (95% CI 1.260–2.679).

Conclusion

Restrictive ventilatory dysfunction, but not OVD, was associated independently with T2DM.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Association of Pulmonary Function Decline over Time with Longitudinal Change of Glycated Hemoglobin in Participants without Diabetes Mellitus
    Wen-Hsien Lee, Da-Wei Wu, Ying-Chih Chen, Yi-Hsueh Liu, Wei-Sheng Liao, Szu-Chia Chen, Chih-Hsing Hung, Chao-Hung Kuo, Ho-Ming Su
    Journal of Personalized Medicine.2021; 11(10): 994.     CrossRef
Estimation of the Size of Dengue and Zika Infection Among Korean Travelers to Southeast Asia and Latin America, 2016–2017
Chaeshin Chu, Een Suk Shin
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2019;10(6):394-398.   Published online December 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2019.10.6.10
  • 2,753 View
  • 53 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

To estimate the number and risk of imported infections resulting from people visiting Asian and Latin American countries.

Methods

The dataset of visitors to 5 Asian countries with dengue were analyzed for 2016 and 2017, and in the Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam, imported cases of zika virus infection were also reported. For zika virus, a single imported case was reported from Brazil in 2016, and 2 imported cases reported from the Maldives in 2017. To understand the transmissibility in 5 Southeast Asian countries, the estimate of the force of infection, i.e., the hazard of infection per year and the average duration of travel has been extracted. Outbound travel numbers were retrieved from the World Tourism Organization, including business travelers.

Results

The incidence of imported dengue in 2016 was estimated at 7.46, 15.00, 2.14, 4.73 and 2.40 per 100,000 travelers visiting Philippines, Indonesia, Thailand, Malaysia and Vietnam, respectively. Similarly, 2.55, 1.65, 1.53, 1.86 and 1.70 per 100,000 travelers in 2017, respectively. It was estimated that there were 60.1 infections (range: from 16.8 to 150.7 infections) with zika virus in Brazil, 2016, and 345.6 infections (range: from 85.4 to 425.5 infections) with zika virus in the Maldives, 2017.

Conclusion

This study emphasizes that dengue and zika virus infections are mild in their nature, and a substantial number of infections may go undetected. An appropriate risk assessment of zika virus infection must use the estimated total size of infections.

The Effects of the Korean Medicine Health Care Program on Stroke-Related Factors and Self-Care Enhancement
Kyoung-Oh Chang, Jung-Hye Lim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2019;10(5):307-314.   Published online October 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2019.10.5.07
  • 3,365 View
  • 172 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study was performed to examine the effects of the Korean medicine healthcare program on stroke-related factors and self-care enhancement.

Methods

This study was a quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest nonequivalent control group design study (N = 58 participants), with 28 in the treatment group (Korean medicine health care program) and 30 in the control group (no intervention). The program was conducted twice a week for 2 hours, for a total of 12 weeks.

Results

There were statistically significant differences in systolic (p = 0.005) and diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.006), cholesterol (p < 0.001), blood glucose (p < 0.001), self-esteem (p = 0.001), self-efficacy (p < 0.001), health perception (p < 0.001), and the health behavior (p < 0.001) between the experimental group and the control group.

Conclusion

Thus, the Korean medicine healthcare program was effective in managing stroke-related factors and enhancing self-care, and should be actively used to develop community health promotion strategies to prevent strokes and prepare long-term measures.

A Preliminary Study to Determine Comprehensive Research and Development Plans for Promoting Mental Health Services
Chul Eung Kim, Young-Mi Ko, Sang-Uk Lee, SungKu Choi, Kiwan Han, Se Jin Park, MinKyung Jo, Yu Kyong Park, Hye Young Lee, Subin Park
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2018;9(6):314-324.   Published online December 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2018.9.6.05
  • 4,637 View
  • 59 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The aim of this study was to analyze research and development projects in mental health services in Korea, using priority evaluation of mental health promotion policies to determine direction of the service.

Methods

An online survey was conducted that targeted experts in the mental health service regarding promotion of mental health in Korea in 2016. The survey was based on 32 policy projects that resulted from 12 strategies according to 4 policy objectives.

Results

Analysis of 32 mental health projects were assessed regarding the possibility of technology development success, magnitude of the ripple effect, and necessity of a national response. It was observed that 3 policy projects relevant to suicide, had a high relative priority. This was followed by policies for improvement of health insurance and the medical benefit cost system, and policies for reinforcement of crisis psychological support such as those for disaster victims.

Conclusion

The prioritization of mental health services should place an emphasis on promotion of a healthy mental lifestyle, rehabilitation support for patients with serious mental illness, and reinforcement of social safety networks for suicide prevention.

Army Soldiers’ Knowledge of, Attitude Towards, and Preventive Behavior Towards Tuberculosis in Korea
Yun Choi, Geum Hee Jeong
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2018;9(5):269-277.   Published online October 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2018.9.5.09
  • 5,014 View
  • 139 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The aim of this study was to gather information about Korean Army soldiers’ attitude towards tuberculosis to enable the development of an informed educational program and potential intervention plans.

Methods

There were 500 male soldiers serving in the Korean Army who responded to questionnaires regarding knowledge of, attitudes towards, and preventive behavior towards tuberculosis. The questionnaires were collected between September 10 until October 1, 2014. Participants’ characteristic that influenced differences in knowledge, attitudes, and preventive behavior towards tuberculosis were compared by t test. Variables that influenced preventive behavior were identified by multiple regression analysis.

Results

The mean scores assessing knowledge of, attitude, and preventive behavior towards tuberculosis were 11.64 (± 4.03) out of 20 points, 3.21 (± 0.38) out of 4 points, and 2.88 (± 0.42) out of 4 points, respectively. Non-smokers were more knowledgeable about tuberculosis than smokers. Participants who had family or friends with tuberculosis had better knowledge and a more productive attitude to tuberculosis. Participants who were educated or obtained information about tuberculosis, received better scores in all areas of knowledge, attitude and preventive behavior compared to other participants. Non-smoking, family or friends who have had tuberculosis, obtaining information about tuberculosis, and positive attitudes towards treatment and preventive education had an explanatory power of 24.6% with regard to preventive behavior against tuberculosis.

Conclusion

More relatable, systemized education should be provided regularly to improve soldiers’ knowledge of, attitudes towards, and prevention against tuberculosis in the Republic of Korea Army.

Citations

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  • Knowledge, Attitudes, and Preventative Behavior Toward Tuberculosis in University Students in Indonesia
    Irma Melyani Puspitasari, Rano Kurnia Sinuraya, Arini Nurhaqiqi Aminudin, Rika Rahmi Kamilah
    Infection and Drug Resistance.2022; Volume 15: 4721.     CrossRef
  • Factors Affecting Preventive Behavior related to Tuberculosis among University Students in Korea: Focused on Knowledge, Attitude and Optimistic Bias related to Tuberculosis
    Myung Soon Kwon, Yun Choi
    Journal of Korean Academy of Fundamentals of Nursi.2020; 27(3): 236.     CrossRef
  • Assessment of knowledge, attitude and practice on tuberculosis among teacher trainees of Samtse College of Education, Bhutan
    Thinley Dorji, Tandin Tshering, Kinley Wangdi, Ritesh G. Menezes
    PLOS ONE.2020; 15(11): e0241923.     CrossRef
  • The Infectivity of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Korean Army Units: Evidence from Outbreak Investigations
    Chang-gyo Yoon, Dong Yoon Kang, Jaehun Jung, Soo Yon Oh, Jin Beom Lee, Mi-Hyun Kim, Younsuk Seo, Hee-Jin Kim
    Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases.2019; 82(4): 298.     CrossRef
Changing Disease Trends in the Northern Gyeonggi-do Province of South Korea from 2002 to 2013: A Big Data Study Using National Health Information Database Cohort
Young Soo Kim, Dong-Hee Lee, Hiun Suk Chae, Kyungdo Han
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2018;9(5):248-254.   Published online October 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2018.9.5.06
  • 3,404 View
  • 71 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

To investigate the chronological patterns of diseases in Northern Gyeonggi-do province, South Korea, and compare these with national data.

Methods

A National Health Insurance cohort based on the National Health Information Database (NHID Cohort 2002–2013) was used to perform a retrospective, population-based study (46,605,433 of the target population, of which 1,025,340 were randomly sampled) to identify disease patterns from 2002 to 2013. Common diseases including malaria, cancer (uterine cervix, urinary bladder, colon), diabetes mellitus, psychiatric disorders, hypertension, intracranial hemorrhage, bronchitis/bronchiolitis, peptic ulcer, and end stage renal disease were evaluated.

Results

Uterine cervix cancer, urinary bladder cancer and colon cancer had the greatest rate of increase in Northern Gyeonggi-do province compared with the rest of the country, but by 2013 the incidence of these cancers had dropped dramatically. Acute myocardial infarction and end stage renal disease also increased over the study period. Psychiatric disorders, diabetes mellitus, hypertension and peptic ulcers showed a gradual increase over time. No obvious differences were found for intracranial hemorrhage or bronchitis/bronchiolitis between the Northern Gyeonggi-do province and the remaining South Korean provinces. Malaria showed a unique time trend, only observed in the Northern Gyeonggi province, peaking in 2004, 2007 and 2009 to 2010.

Conclusion

This study showed that the Northern Gyeonggi-do province population had a different disease profile over time, compared with collated data for the remaining provinces in South Korea. “Big data” studies using the National Health Insurance cohort database can provide insight into the healthcare environment for healthcare providers, stakeholders and policymakers.

Developing the High-Risk Drinking Scorecard Model in Korea
Jun-Tae Han, Il-Su Park, Suk-Bok Kang, Byeong-Gyu Seo
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2018;9(5):231-239.   Published online October 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2018.9.5.04
  • 14,551 View
  • 96 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study aimed to develop a high-risk drinking scorecard using cross-sectional data from the 2014 Korea Community Health Survey.

Methods

Data were collected from records for 149,592 subjects who had participated in the Korea Community Health Survey conducted from 2014. The scorecard model was developed using data mining, a scorecard and points to double the odds approach for weighted multiple logistic regression.

Results

This study found that there were many major influencing factors for high-risk drinkers which included gender, age, educational level, occupation, whether they received health check-ups, depressive symptoms, over-moderate physical activity, mental stress, smoking status, obese status, and regular breakfast. Men in their thirties to fifties had a high risk of being a drinker and the risks in office workers and sales workers were high. Those individuals who were current smokers had a higher risk of drinking. In the scorecard results, the highest score range was observed for gender, age, educational level, and smoking status, suggesting that these were the most important risk factors.

Conclusion

A credit risk scorecard system can be applied to quantify the scoring method, not only to help the medical service provider to understand the meaning, but also to help the general public to understand the danger of high-risk drinking more easily.

Citations

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  • A Simple-to-Use Score for Identifying Individuals at High Risk of Denosumab-Associated Hypocalcemia in Postmenopausal Osteoporosis: A Real-World Cohort Study
    Kyoung Jin Kim, Namki Hong, Seunghyun Lee, Miryung Kim, Yumie Rhee
    Calcified Tissue International.2020; 107(6): 567.     CrossRef
Joint Association of Screen Time and Physical Activity with Obesity: Findings from the Korea Media Panel Study
Jihyung Shin
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2018;9(4):207-212.   Published online August 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2018.9.4.10
  • 7,034 View
  • 86 Download
  • 7 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

There is evidence to suggest that sedentary behavior is associated with a higher risk of metabolic disease. The aim of this study was to investigate cross-sectional joint associations of physical activity (PA) and screen time (ST), with the risk of obesity in Korean adults.

Methods

The Korea Media Panel Study consisted of a household interview and a self-administered diary survey on media usage over 3 days. ST (hours/day) was defined as the reported daily average hours spent watching television, computing (i.e., desktop, notebook, netbook, tablets), smartphone and video game console use. Cross-sectional associations of obesity (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2) and the amount of daily ST and PA were examined by logistic regression models adjusting for other possible confounders including alcohol consumption, smoking, depressive symptoms and demographic information. There were 7,808 participants included in the analyses.

Results

Increased ST was significantly associated with the risk of obesity (controlling for other possible confounders), but PA level was not found to be significantly linked. Participants who engaged in screen time > 6 hours per day had a higher incidence of obesity.

Conclusion

This study provides evidence of the association between ST and the increased incidence of obesity measured by BMI, independent of PA amongst Korean adults.

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    Anca Bacârea, Vladimir Constantin Bacârea, Cristina Cînpeanu, Claudiu Teodorescu, Ana Gabriela Seni, Raquel P. F. Guiné, Monica Tarcea
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  • Association of total sedentary behaviour and television viewing with risk of overweight/obesity, type 2 diabetes and hypertension: A dose–response meta‐analysis
    Chunmei Guo, Qionggui Zhou, Dongdong Zhang, Pei Qin, Quanman Li, Gang Tian, Dechen Liu, Xu Chen, Leilei Liu, Feiyan Liu, Cheng Cheng, Ranran Qie, Minghui Han, Shengbing Huang, Xiaoyan Wu, Yang Zhao, Yongcheng Ren, Ming Zhang, Yu Liu, Dongsheng Hu
    Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.2020; 22(1): 79.     CrossRef
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    Magdalena Górnicka, Małgorzata Ewa Drywień, Monika A. Zielinska, Jadwiga Hamułka
    Nutrients.2020; 12(8): 2324.     CrossRef
  • The Association between Esports Participation, Health and Physical Activity Behaviour
    Michael G Trotter, Tristan J. Coulter, Paul A Davis, Dylan R Poulus, Remco Polman
    International Journal of Environmental Research an.2020; 17(19): 7329.     CrossRef
  • Associations of Meal Timing and Frequency with Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome among Korean Adults
    Kyungho Ha, YoonJu Song
    Nutrients.2019; 11(10): 2437.     CrossRef

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives