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5 "Anxiety"
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Original Articles
Generalized anxiety and sleep quality among health care professionals during the COVID-19 pandemic: a cross-sectional study from a tertiary healthcare institution in Eastern India
Bijaya Nanda Naik, Sanjay Pandey, Rajath Rao, Manisha Verma, Prashant Kumar Singh
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2022;13(1):51-61.   Published online February 8, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0316
  • 2,279 View
  • 41 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
With the emergence of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, healthcare professionals (HCPs) have experienced high levels of stress and anxiety because of the high risk of infection for themselves and their families. This has led to acute sleep problems for HCP. This study was designed to assess the anxiety and sleep quality of HCPs during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: This cross-sectional study analyzed 370 HCPs employed at All India Institute of Medical Sciences Patna over 3 months, using the standard Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item scale (GAD-7) for suspected GAD and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index for sleep quality. Results were tabulated and multivariable binomial logistic regression analysis was done to determine the predictors of poor sleep. Significance was attributed to p<0.05. Results: Of the 370 HCPs screened, 52 (14.1%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 10.8%–18.1%) were found to have GAD and 195 (52.7%; 95% CI, 47.5%–57.9%) were found to be poor sleepers. The presence of any addictive habit (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.833; 95% CI, 1.12–2.8), unprotected contact with COVID-19 cases (AOR, 1.902; 95% CI, 1.1–3.3), and the presence of GAD (AOR, 5.57; 95% CI, 2.5–12.4) were found to be predictors of poor sleep quality among HCPs. Conclusion: A significant proportion of HCPs were found to have suspected GAD and were poor sleepers. This highlights the need for measures to confront this problem.
Prevalence of Internet Addiction, Poor Sleep Quality, and Depressive Symptoms Among Medical Students: A Cross-Sectional Study
Aanchal Anant Awasthi, Neha Taneja, Sonam Maheshwari, Trisha Gupta, Bhavika
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2020;11(5):303-308.   Published online October 22, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2020.11.5.06
  • 4,779 View
  • 130 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This objective of the study was to report the prevalence of internet addiction, sleep quality, depression, anxiety, and stress in undergraduate medical students.

Methods

A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study was conducted among 221 undergraduate medical students at Government Doon Medical College, Dehradun, Uttarakhand. Data pertaining to internet addiction, sleep quality, and depressive symptoms were also collected using validated and reliable questionnaires (Young Internet Addiction Test, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and Depression Anxiety Stress Scale 21).

Results

The prevalence of poor sleep quality, severe anxiety, and severe depression was 33.9%, 7.3% and 3.6%, respectively. The place of residence was significantly associated (p = 0.006) with internet addiction. The mean Young Internet Addiction Test score was higher in students residing in hostels compared with students staying with families. Stress was associated with age. The mean stress score was higher in the age group 17–20 compared with the 21–24 age group. Stress and depression were independent predictors of sleep quality.

Conclusion

Quality sleep is the key for good health. Based on limited samples, this study showed that poor sleep quality was associated with stress and depression. Hence, continuous counselling is suggested for supporting students managing their stress and depression.

Dental Procedures, Oral Practices, and Associated Anxiety: A Study on Late-teenagers
Rahul Bhola, Reema Malhotra
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(4):219-232.   Published online August 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.06.007
  • 1,326 View
  • 12 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The study aims to determine the degree of anxiety pertaining to dental procedures and various oral hygiene practices among college teenagers.
Methods
Corah's Modified Dental Anxiety Scale was administered on a randomly chosen sample of 100 Indian college students (50 males and 50 females) of Delhi University, belonging to the age group of 17–20 years.
Results
Descriptive statistical computations revealed 12.14 years as the mean age of first dental visit, with moderately high levels of anxiety (60.75%) for various dental procedures among the Indian teenagers and 5% lying in the “phobic or extremely anxious” category. With merely 4.16% people going for regular consultations, general check-ups evoked 78.3% anxiety and having an injection or a tooth removed was perceived as the most threatening. The sample subgroup not using mouthwash and mouthspray, smokers, and alcohol drinkers with improper oral hygiene practices experienced much higher anxiety towards routine dental procedures.
Conclusion
The majority of the Indian youngsters had an evasive attitude of delaying dental treatment. The core problems lay in deficient health care knowledge, lack of patient-sensitive pedagogy to train dental professionals, inaccessibility of services, and a dismissive attitude towards medical help. The feelings of fear and anxiety prevalent among the Indian youth offer significant insights into causes and preventive measures for future research and practice. Methods of education and motivation could be developed to dissipate the anxiety amongst Indian teenagers that prevent routine dental visits and maintenance of adequate oral hygiene.
Exposure–Response Relationship Between Aircraft Noise and Sleep Quality: A Community-based Cross-sectional Study
Soo Jeong Kim, Sang Kug Chai, Keou Won Lee, Jae-Beom Park, Kyoung-Bok Min, Hyun Gwon Kil, Chan Lee, Kyung Jong Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(2):108-114.   Published online April 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.03.004
  • 1,705 View
  • 25 Download
  • 17 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Exposure to aircraft noise has been shown to have adverse health effects, causing annoyance and affecting the health-related quality of life, sleep, and mental states of those exposed to it. This study aimed to determine sleep quality in participants residing near an airfield and to evaluate the relationship between the levels of aircraft noise and sleep quality.
Methods
Neighboring regions of a military airfield were divided into three groups: a high exposure group, a low exposure group, and a control group. A total of 1082 participants (aged 30–79 years) completed a comprehensive self-administered questionnaire requesting information about demographics, medical history, lifestyle, and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index.
Results
Of the 1082 participants, 1005 qualified for this study. The prevalence of sleep disturbance was 45.5% in the control group, 71.8% in the low exposure group, and 77.1% in the high exposure group (p for trend < 0.001). After adjusting for potential confounding factors, we determined the exposure–response relationship between the degree of aircraft noise and sleep quality. Of the participants with a normal mental status, the prevalence of sleep disturbance was 2.61-fold higher in the low exposure group and 3.52-fold higher in the high exposure group than in the control group.
Conclusion
The relationship between aircraft noise and health should be further evaluated through a large-scale follow-up study.
Community-Based Risk Communication Survey: Risk Prevention Behaviors in Communities during the H1N1 crisis, 2010
Soo Jeong Kim, Jin A. Han, Tae-Yong Lee, Tae-Yoon Hwang, Keun-Sang Kwon, Ki Soo Park, Kyung Jong Lee, Moon Shik Kim, Soon Young Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(1):9-19.   Published online February 28, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.12.001
  • 1,685 View
  • 17 Download
  • 15 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The present study aimed to investigate the prevalence of and factors associated with H1N1 preventive behaviors in a community-based population.
Methods
A cross-sectional study was conducted in three urban and two rural communities in Korea. Interviews were conducted with 3462 individuals (1608 men and 1854 women) aged ≥ 19 years during February–March 2010. Influenza-related information including anxiety, preventive behaviors and their perceived effectiveness, vaccination status, past influenza-like illness symptoms, and sources of and trust in information was obtained.
Results
Among 3462 participants, 173 reported experiencing influenza-like illness symptoms within the past 12 months. The mean H1N1 preventive behavior score was 25.5 ± 5.5 (out of a possible 40). The percent of participants reporting high perceived effectiveness and high anxiety was 46.2% and 21.4%, respectively. After controlling for potential confounders, H1N1 preventive behavior scores were predicted by a high (β = 3.577, p < 0.001) or moderate (β = 2.529, p < 0.001) perception of their effectiveness. Similarly, moderate (β = 1.516, p < 0.001) and high (β = 4.103, p < 0.001) anxiety scores predicted high preventive behavior scores.
Conclusion
Effective methods of promoting population behavior change may be nationwide campaigns through mass media, as well as education and promotion by health care providers and broadcasters.

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives