Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
6 "Shin-Hyeong Cho"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Original Articles
Annual Fluctuation in Chigger Mite Populations and Orientia Tsutsugamushi Infections in Scrub Typhus Endemic Regions of South Korea
Seong Yoon Kim, Byoungchul Gill, Bong Gu Song, Hyuk Chu, Won Il Park, Hee Il Lee, E-hyun Shin, Shin-Hyeong Cho, Jong Yul Roh
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2019;10(6):351-358.   Published online December 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2019.10.6.05
  • 3,297 View
  • 191 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Chigger mites are vectors for scrub typhus. This study evaluated the annual fluctuations in chigger mite populations and Orientia tsutsugamushi infections in South Korea.

Methods

During 2006 and 2007, chigger mites were collected monthly from wild rodents in 4 scrub typhus endemic regions of South Korea. The chigger mites were classified based on morphological characteristics, and analyzed using nested PCR for the detection of Orientia tsutsugamushi.

Results

During the surveillance period, the overall trapping rate for wild rodents was 10.8%. In total, 17,457 chigger mites (representing 5 genera and 15 species) were collected, and the average chigger index (representing the number of chigger mites per rodent), was 31.7. The monthly chigger index was consistently high (> 30) in Spring (March to April) and Autumn (October to November). The mite species included Leptotrombidium pallidum (43.5%), L. orientale (18.9%), L. scutellare (18.1%), L. palpale (10.6%), and L. zetum (3.6%). L. scutellare and L. palpale populations, were relatively higher in Autumn. Monthly O. tsutsugamushi infection rates in wild rodents (average: 4.8%) and chigger mites (average: 0.7%) peaked in Spring and Autumn.

Conclusion

The findings demonstrated a bimodal pattern of the incidence of O. tsutsugamushi infections. Higher infection rates were observed in both wild rodents and chigger mites, in Spring and Autumn. However, this did not reflect the unimodal incidence of scrub typhus in Autumn. Further studies are needed to identify factors, such as human behavior and harvesting in Autumn that may explain this discordance.

Development of a Diagnostic Kit to Detect Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia
Hyeng-Il Cheun, Byung-Suk Chung, Da-Won Ma, Bo-La Goo, Shin-Hyeong Cho, Mi-jung Ji, Won-Ja Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2013;4(3):146-151.   Published online June 30, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.04.006
  • 1,837 View
  • 17 Download
  • 7 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study aims to develop a high-sensitivity antibody diagnostic kit that will enable a rapid and accurate detection of Cryptospofidium parvum and Giardia lamblia in patients with diarrhea.
Methods
The cultivated C. parvum oocysts and G. lamblia cysts in each calf and dog were injected to mice to obtain antibodies, which were titrated. Spleen cells of the immunized mouse were separated and blended with myelomas to produce hybrid cell lines that form monoclonal antibodies. Using ELISA method, antibodies that specifically respond to C. parvum and G.lamblia were then selected. The cells were injected into the abdominal cavity of a BALB/c mouse to isolate hydrops abdominis containing high level of antibodies. The IgG antibody was purified using protein G gel.
Results
The detection limit of monoclonal antibodies for Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia was 125 oocysts/mL and 1250 cysts/mL, respectively. In addition, during testing they did not show cross-reactivity to viruses (n = 15), bacteria (n =17), and parasites (n = 9).
Conclusion
The rapid diagnostic antibody kit developed in this study, which specifically responds to C. parvum and G. lamblia, will be useful in detecting and monitoring diarrheal infections.
The First Outbreak of Giardiasis with Drinking Water in Korea
Hyeng-Il Cheun, Cheon-Hyeon Kim, Shin-Hyeong Cho, Da-Won Ma, Bo-La Goo, Mun-Su Na, Seung-Ki Youn, Won-Ja Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2013;4(2):89-92.   Published online April 30, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.03.003
  • 1,672 View
  • 17 Download
  • 19 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
To identify the pathogen of the diarrhea outbreak in a village in Jeollabuk province in Korea in April 2010.
Methods
DNA extraction was performed from the 120 L of collected water, which was centrifuged at 10,000 x g for 30 min. PCR reactions were conducted in a total of 25 ul, which included PCR premix (GenDEPOT, Barker, TX, USA), 2 ul (∼100 ng) of extracted DNA, and 10 pmol of each primer.
Results
Nine people out of 25 had a symptom of abdominal pain accompanied by diarrhea after they used stored valley water in a water tank as a provisional water supply source without chlorine sterilization. Among them Giardia lamblia was detected in fecal samples of 7 people using the polymerase chain reaction method. Although G. lamblia was also detected from water provided by the provisional water supply system stored in the water tank and used as drinking water, it was not detected in the water tank itself. This water-borne outbreak is considered to have occurred when the provisional water supply tube was destroyed under a building construction and contaminated by G. lamblia, but its precise cause has not been clarified.
Conclusion
This outbreak resulting from G. lamblia is very meaningful as the first outbreak of an infection by a water-borne parasite in Korea.
Articleses
Longitudinal and Cross-Sectional Genetic Diversity in the Korean Peninsula Based on the P vivax Merozoite Surface Protein Gene [Volume 2, Issue 3, December 2011, Pages 158 - 163]
Jung-Yeon Kim, Eun-Jung Suh, Hyo-Soon Yu, Hyun-Sik Jung, In-Ho Park, Yien-Kyeoug Choi, Kyoung-Mi Choi, Shin-Hyeong Cho, Won-Ja Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2012;3(1):63-63.   Published online December 31, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2011.11.039.
  • 1,472 View
  • 11 Download
PDF
Longitudinal and Cross-Sectional Genetic Diversity in the Korean Peninsula Based on the P vivax Merozoite Surface Protein Gene
Jung-Yeon Kim, Eun-Jung Suh, Hyo-Soon Yu, Hyun-Sik Jung, In-Ho Park, Yien-Kyeoug Choi, Kyoung-Mi Choi, Shin-Hyeong Cho, Won-Ja Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2011;2(3):158-163.   Published online December 31, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2011.11.039
  • 1,400 View
  • 15 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Vivax malaria has reemerged and become endemic in Korea. Our study aimed to analyze by both longitudinal and cross-sectional genetic diversity of this malaria based on the P vivax Merozoite Surface Protein (PvMSP) gene parasites recently found in the Korean peninsula.
Methods
PvMSP-1 gene sequence analysis from P vivax isolates (n = 835) during the 1996-2010 period were longitudinally analyzed and the isolates from the Korean peninsula through South Korea, the demilitarized zone and North Korea collected in 2008-2010 were enrolled in an overall analysis of MSP-1 gene diversity.
Results
New recombinant subtypes and severe multiple-cloneinfection rates were observed in recent vivax parasites. Regional variation was also observed in the study sites.
Conclusion
This study revealed the great complexity of genetic variation and rapid dissemination of genes in P vivax. It also showed interesting patterns of diversity depending, on the region in the Korean Peninsula. Understanding the parasiteninsula. Under genetic variation may help to analyze trends and assess the extent of endemic malaria in Korea.
Original Article
Prevalence of Clonorchis sinensis Infections Along the Five Major Rivers in Republic of Korea, 2007
Hyun-Kyung Kim, Hyeng-Il Cheun, Byung-Suk Cheun, Ki-Yeon Lee, Tong-Soo Kim, Sang-Eun Lee, Won-ja Lee, Shin-Hyeong Cho
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2010;1(1):43-49.   Published online December 31, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2010.12.010
  • 1,467 View
  • 11 Download
  • 19 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The prevalence of Clonorchis sinensis infection was investigated among residents of the five major river basins, that is, Hangang, Nakdonggang, Seomjingang, Yeongsangang, and Geumgang River basins in Korea.
Methods
From January to December 2007, a total of 31,268 stool samples were collected from 29 localities and examined by the formalin-ether sedimentation technique.
Results
Intestinal parasite eggs and/or protozoan cysts were detected from 2957 (9.5%) inhabitants. Number of residents harbouring helminth eggs in the faeces was 2542 (8.1%) for C. sinensis, 255 (0.8%) for Heterophyes spp., 36 (0.1%) for Echinostoma spp., 30 (0.1%) for Trichuris trichiura, 8 (0.03%) for Ascaris lumbricoides, 7 (0.02%) for Gymnophalloide seoi, and 50 (0.02%) for Trichostrongylus orientalis. Number of residents harbouring protozoan cysts in the faeces was 133 (1.3%) for Entamoeba spp. and 50 (0.2%) for Giardia lamblia. The positive rates of C. sinensis in Nakdonggang, Seomjingang, Yeongsangang, Geumgang, and Hangang River basins were 12.2%, 9.5%, 3.3%, 3.0%, and 1.0%, respectively. The egg positive rate of C. sinensis was higher in male (10.6%) than in female (6.1%), and the age group of 50s had the highest positive rate (10.4%).
Conclusion
The result of this study revealed little decrease in positive rate of C. sinensis compared with the result of southern endemic areas of Korea in 2006.

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives