Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
2 "Kyung Jong Lee"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Original Articles
Exposure–Response Relationship Between Aircraft Noise and Sleep Quality: A Community-based Cross-sectional Study
Soo Jeong Kim, Sang Kug Chai, Keou Won Lee, Jae-Beom Park, Kyoung-Bok Min, Hyun Gwon Kil, Chan Lee, Kyung Jong Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(2):108-114.   Published online April 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.03.004
  • 2,015 View
  • 25 Download
  • 17 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Exposure to aircraft noise has been shown to have adverse health effects, causing annoyance and affecting the health-related quality of life, sleep, and mental states of those exposed to it. This study aimed to determine sleep quality in participants residing near an airfield and to evaluate the relationship between the levels of aircraft noise and sleep quality.
Methods
Neighboring regions of a military airfield were divided into three groups: a high exposure group, a low exposure group, and a control group. A total of 1082 participants (aged 30–79 years) completed a comprehensive self-administered questionnaire requesting information about demographics, medical history, lifestyle, and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index.
Results
Of the 1082 participants, 1005 qualified for this study. The prevalence of sleep disturbance was 45.5% in the control group, 71.8% in the low exposure group, and 77.1% in the high exposure group (p for trend < 0.001). After adjusting for potential confounding factors, we determined the exposure–response relationship between the degree of aircraft noise and sleep quality. Of the participants with a normal mental status, the prevalence of sleep disturbance was 2.61-fold higher in the low exposure group and 3.52-fold higher in the high exposure group than in the control group.
Conclusion
The relationship between aircraft noise and health should be further evaluated through a large-scale follow-up study.
Community-Based Risk Communication Survey: Risk Prevention Behaviors in Communities during the H1N1 crisis, 2010
Soo Jeong Kim, Jin A. Han, Tae-Yong Lee, Tae-Yoon Hwang, Keun-Sang Kwon, Ki Soo Park, Kyung Jong Lee, Moon Shik Kim, Soon Young Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(1):9-19.   Published online February 28, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.12.001
  • 1,986 View
  • 17 Download
  • 16 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The present study aimed to investigate the prevalence of and factors associated with H1N1 preventive behaviors in a community-based population.
Methods
A cross-sectional study was conducted in three urban and two rural communities in Korea. Interviews were conducted with 3462 individuals (1608 men and 1854 women) aged ≥ 19 years during February–March 2010. Influenza-related information including anxiety, preventive behaviors and their perceived effectiveness, vaccination status, past influenza-like illness symptoms, and sources of and trust in information was obtained.
Results
Among 3462 participants, 173 reported experiencing influenza-like illness symptoms within the past 12 months. The mean H1N1 preventive behavior score was 25.5 ± 5.5 (out of a possible 40). The percent of participants reporting high perceived effectiveness and high anxiety was 46.2% and 21.4%, respectively. After controlling for potential confounders, H1N1 preventive behavior scores were predicted by a high (β = 3.577, p < 0.001) or moderate (β = 2.529, p < 0.001) perception of their effectiveness. Similarly, moderate (β = 1.516, p < 0.001) and high (β = 4.103, p < 0.001) anxiety scores predicted high preventive behavior scores.
Conclusion
Effective methods of promoting population behavior change may be nationwide campaigns through mass media, as well as education and promotion by health care providers and broadcasters.

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives