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Original Articles
2019 Tabletop Exercise for Laboratory Diagnosis and Analyses of Unknown Disease Outbreaks by the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Il-Hwan Kim, Jun Hyeong Jang, Su-Kyoung Jo, Jin Sun No, Seung-Hee Seo, Jun-Young Kim, Sang-Oun Jung, Jeong-Min Kim, Sang-Eun Lee, Hye-Kyung Park, Eun-Jin Kim, Jun Ho Jeon, Myung-Min Choi, Boyeong Ryu, Yoon Suk Jang, Hwami Kim, Jin Lee, Seung-Hwan Shin, Hee Kyoung Kim, Eun-Kyoung Kim, Ye Eun Park, Cheon-Kwon Yoo, Sang-Won Lee, Myung-Guk Han, Gi-Eun Rhie, Byung Hak Kang
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2020;11(5):280-285.   Published online October 22, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2020.11.5.03
  • 4,233 View
  • 96 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has published “A Guideline for Unknown Disease Outbreaks (UDO).” The aim of this report was to introduce tabletop exercises (TTX) to prepare for UDO in the future.

Methods

The UDO Laboratory Analyses Task Force in Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in April 2018, assigned unknown diseases into 5 syndromes, designed an algorithm for diagnosis, and made a panel list for diagnosis by exclusion. Using the guidelines and laboratory analyses for UDO, TTX were introduced.

Results

Since September 9th, 2018, the UDO Laboratory Analyses Task Force has been preparing TTX based on a scenario of an outbreak caused by a novel coronavirus. In December 2019, through TTX, individual missions, epidemiological investigations, sample treatments, diagnosis by exclusions, and next generation sequencing analysis were discussed, and a novel coronavirus was identified as the causal pathogen.

Conclusion

Guideline and laboratory analyses for UDO successfully applied in TTX. Conclusions drawn from TTX could be applied effectively in the analyses for the initial response to COVID-19, an ongoing epidemic of 2019 – 2020. Therefore, TTX should continuously be conducted for the response and preparation against UDO.

Development and Utilization of a Rapid and Accurate Epidemic Investigation Support System for COVID-19
Young Joon Park, Sang Yun Cho, Jin Lee, Ikjin Lee, Won-Ho Park, Seungmyeong Jeong, Seongyun Kim, Seokjun Lee, Jaeho Kim, Ok Park
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2020;11(3):118-127.   Published online May 20, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2020.11.3.06
  • 9,889 View
  • 282 Download
  • 14 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

In this pandemic situation caused by a novel coronavirus disease in 2019 (COVID-19), an electronic support system that can rapidly and accurately perform epidemic investigations, is needed. It would systematically secure and analyze patients’ data (who have been confirmed to have the infection), location information, and credit card usage.

Methods

The “Infectious Disease Prevention and Control Act” in South Korea, established a legal basis for the securement, handling procedure, and disclosure of information required for epidemic investigations. The Epidemic Investigation Support System (EISS) was developed as an application platform on the Smart City data platform.

Results

The EISS performed the function of inter-institutional communication which reduced the processing period of patients’ data in comparison to other methods. This system automatically marked confirmed cases’ tracking data on a map and hot-spot analysis which lead to the prediction of areas where people may be vulnerable to infection.

Conclusion

The EISS was designed and implemented for use during an epidemic investigation to prevent the spread of an infectious disease, by specifically tracking confirmed cases of infection.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
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    Taewon Han, Heedo Park, Yungje Jeong, Jungmin Lee, Eungyeong Shon, Man-Seong Park, Minki Sung
    The Journal of Infectious Diseases.2022; 225(9): 1554.     CrossRef
  • Public health in times of crisis: An overlooked variable in city management theories?
    Celso Machado, Daielly Melina Nassif Mantovani Ribeiro, Adriana Backx Noronha Viana
    Sustainable Cities and Society.2021; 66: 102671.     CrossRef
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    Epidemiology and Infection.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Uichin Lee, Auk Kim
    Frontiers in Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Informatics.2021; 8(2): 22.     CrossRef
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    Katarzyna Kolasa, Francesca Mazzi, Ewa Leszczuk-Czubkowska, Zsombor Zrubka, Márta Péntek
    JMIR mHealth and uHealth.2021; 9(6): e23250.     CrossRef
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    Joseph Christian Obnial, Maria Beatriz Baron, Hannah Andrea Sagsagat, Erika Ong, Ma. Alexandra Nicola Valenzuela, Don Eliseo Lucero-Prisno III
    Journal of Primary Health Care.2021; 13(2): 116.     CrossRef
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    Ayyoob Sharifi, Amir Reza Khavarian-Garmsir, Rama Krishna Reddy Kummitha
    Sustainability.2021; 13(14): 8018.     CrossRef
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    Junic Kim, Kelly Ashihara
    International Journal of Environmental Research an.2020; 17(18): 6691.     CrossRef
  • Evidence of Long-Distance Droplet Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 by Direct Air Flow in a Restaurant in Korea
    Keun-Sang Kwon, Jung-Im Park, Young Joon Park, Don-Myung Jung, Ki-Wahn Ryu, Ju-Hyung Lee
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
Corrigendum
Corrigendum to “Exposure to Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and the Risk of Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis [Volume 5, Issue 2, April 2014, Pages 77–84]”
Jae-Hong Park, Eun Shil Cha, Yousun Ko, Myung-Sil Hwang, Jin-Hwan Hong, Won Jin Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2015;6(4):279-279.   Published online August 31, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2015.07.004
  • 1,911 View
  • 16 Download
PDF
Original Article
Exposure to Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and the Risk of Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
Jae-Hong Park, Eun Shil Cha, Yousun Ko, Myung-Sil Hwang, Jin-Hwan Hong, Won Jin Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(2):77-84.   Published online April 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.02.001
  • 2,149 View
  • 24 Download
  • 20 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study extended and updated a meta-analysis of the association between exposure to dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and the risk of breast cancer.
Methods
We reviewed the published literature on exposure to DDE and breast cancer risk to update a meta-analysis from 2004. The total of 35 studies included 16 hospital-based case–control studies, 11 population-based case–control studies, and 10 nested case–control studies identified through keyword searches in the PubMed and EMBASE databases.
Results
The summary odds ratio (OR) for the identified studies was 1.03 (95% confidence interval 0.95–1.12) and the overall heterogeneity in the OR was observed (I2 = 40.9; p = 0.006). Subgroup meta-analyses indicated no significant association between exposure to DDE and breast cancer risk by the type of design, study years, biological specimen, and geographical region of the study, except from population-based case–control studies with estimated DDE levels in serum published in 1990s.
Conclusion
Existing studies do not support the view that DDE increases the risk of breast cancer in humans. However, further studies incorporating more detailed information on DDT exposure and other potential risk factors for breast cancer are needed.

Citations

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    Dotse Selali Chormey
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    Murphy Lam Yim Wan, Vanessa Anna Co, Hani El-Nezami
    Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition.2022; 62(24): 6549.     CrossRef
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    El Hadia Mansouri, Mohamed Reggabi
    Emerging Contaminants.2021; 7: 35.     CrossRef
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    El Hadia Mansouri, Mohamed Reggabi
    Chemosphere.2021; 264: 128596.     CrossRef
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    Yuntao Zhang, Ran Chen, Jim E. Riviere, Jeffrey Comer
    Processes.2021; 9(10): 1764.     CrossRef
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    Marisa J.L. Aitken, Christopher B. Benton, Ghayas C. Issa, Koji Sasaki, Musa Yilmaz, Nicholas J. Short
    Acta Haematologica.2021; 144(5): 585.     CrossRef
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    Nickilou Y. Krigbaum, Piera M. Cirillo, Julie D. Flom, Jasmine A. McDonald, Mary Beth Terry, Barbara A. Cohn
    Reproductive Toxicology.2020; 92: 85.     CrossRef
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    Louisane Eve, Béatrice Fervers, Muriel Le Romancer, Nelly Etienne-Selloum
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    Delphine Bachelet, Marc-André Verner, Monica Neri, Émilie Cordina Duverger, Corinne Charlier, Patrick Arveux, Sami Haddad, Pascal Guénel
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Articles
Seroepidemiology of Hepatitis A Infection in Northeastern China, Korea, and Japan
Haesun Yun, Hyeok-Jin Lee, Youngsil Yoon, Kisang Kim, Sungsoo Kim, Myung-Hee Shin, Miyuki Taniguchi, Soo Ryang Kim, Mi Kyung Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2012;3(1):31-35.   Published online December 31, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2012.01.005
  • 1,972 View
  • 13 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The epidemiological patterns of endemic hepatitis A virus (HAV) are unclear in northeastern Asia depending on the ethnicity of the country in question. The purpose of this study was to investigate the seroprevalence of HAV in northeastern China, South Korea, and Japan.
Methods
A total of 1,500 serum samples were collected from five groups of inhabitants (300 each) who were over 40 years of age (Korean Chinese, indigenous Chinese, South Korean, Korean living in Japan, and indigenous Japanese). The samples were screened for antibodies to HAV using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.
Results
Positivity for HAV antibodies was 93.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 90.9–96.4) in Koreans living in northeastern China, 99.7% (95% CI: 99.0–100.3) in indigenous Chinese, 98.0% (95% CI: 96.4–99.6) in indigenous Koreans, 33.3% (95% CI: 28.0–38.7) in Koreans living in Japan, and 20.4% (95% CI: 15.8–25.0) in indigenous Japanese persons. The overall anti-HAV prevalence was not significantly different between northeastern China and South Korea, but it was different in Japan.
Conclusions
These results indicate that differences in seroprevalence can be attributed to geological, environmental, and socioeconomic conditions rather than ethnicity.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Prevalence of Anti-Hav IgG Antibodies in the Population of the Łódź Macroregion by Age Group
    Gabriela Henrykowska, Kornelia Kotecka, Aleksandra Jabłkowska, Andrzej Buczyński, Joanna Woźny
    Polish Hyperbaric Research.2021; 76(3): 67.     CrossRef
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Original Article
Seroprevalence of Hepatitis A and E Viruses Based on the Third Korea National Health and Nutrition Survey in Korea
Haesun Yun, Hyeok-Jin Lee, Doosung Cheon, Chaeshin Chu, Kyung Won Oh, Young Taek Kim, Youngmee Jee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2011;2(1):46-50.   Published online June 30, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2011.04.009
  • 2,057 View
  • 12 Download
  • 7 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The purpose of this study was to investigate the seroprevalence of hepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis E virus (HEV) in Korea during 2005.
Methods
Study subjects were selected from across Korea using a stratified multistage probability sampling design, and HAV and HEV seroprevalence was compared on the basis of sex, age, and residency. A total of 497 rural and urban people aged 10–99 years of age (mean ± SD age = 28.87 ± 17.63 years) were selected by two-stage cluster sampling and tested serologically for anti-HAV and anti-HEV IgG using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.
Results
Among this population, the overall seroprevalence of HAV was 63.80% (55.21% aged in their 20s and 95.92% in their 30s, p < 0.01) and that of HEV was 9.40% (5.21% aged in their 20s and 7.14% in their 30s, p < 0.01). Seroprevalence also varied according to area of residence. HEV prevalence in rural areas was higher than that of urban regions based on the anti-HEV antibody, odds ratio 3.22 (95% confidence interval: 1.46–7.10, p < 0.01). There were no significant differences between male and female against anti-HAV/HEV antibodies.
Conclusion
Our study suggested that the seropositive rates of HAV and HEV might be related to age and environmental conditions.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Factors associated with anti-hepatitis A virus immunoglobulin G seropositivity among Korean workers: a cross-sectional study
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    Chaeshin Chu
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Brief Report
Trends in Water- and Foodborne Disease Outbreaks in Korea, 2007–2009
Jin Gwack, Kyoung-Chan Lee, Hyo Jin Lee, Wooseok Kwak, Dong Woo Lee, Yeon Hwa Choi, Jin Seok Kim, Young Ah Kang
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2010;1(1):50-54.   Published online December 31, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2010.12.011
  • 2,208 View
  • 13 Download
  • 14 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
In Korea, every outbreak of acute gastroenteritis in two or more patients who are epidemiologically related is investigated by local public health centres to determine causative agents and control the outbreak with the support of the Korean Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The findings and conclusions of each outbreak investigation have been summarized annually since 2007 to make reports and statistics of water- and foodborne disease outbreaks.
Methods
All outbreaks reported to Korean Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from 2007 to 2009 were included in the study. We analysed the trends and epidemiologic aspects of outbreaks by month, year, and location.
Results
The total number of outbreaks decreased steadily each year for the period the study covered, whereas the number of patients per outbreak continued to increase resulting from a dramatic increase in the number of patients per outbreak in food service establishments. The outbreaks occurred in the period of June to September, when temperature and humidity are relatively high, which accounted for 44.3% of total outbreaks. The monthly number of outbreaks decreased steadily until November after peaking in May 2009. The most common causative agent was norovirus (16.5%) followed by pathogenic Escherichia coli. The rate of causative agent identification was 60.1%, with higher identification rates in larger outbreaks.
Conclusions
Although a decreasing trend of outbreaks by year was observed in the study, the food services in schools and companies require more attention to hygiene and sanitation to prevent large outbreaks. The ability to establish the cause of an outbreak should be further improved.

Citations

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    Journal of Food Protection.2014; 77(9): 1481.     CrossRef
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    Shinje Moon, Il-Woong Sohn, Yeongseon Hong, Hyungmin Lee, Ji-Hyuk Park, Geun-Yong Kwon, Sangwon Lee, Seung-Ki Youn
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    Ji-Hyuk Park, Sung-Suk Oh, Kyung-Hwan Oh, Jaeseung Shin, Eun Jung Jang, Byung-Yool Jun, Seung-Ki Youn, Seung-Hak Cho
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    Food Science and Biotechnology.2013; 22(2): 577.     CrossRef
  • Norovirus Contamination Levels in Ground Water Treatment Systems Used for Food-Catering Facilities in South Korea
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PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives