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Original Articles
Long-term Treatment with Anti-platelet Agents for Collagen-induced Arthritis Improves Radiological Findings
Chan Kim, Toyou Kim, Jihyung Yoo, Dong-Hyuk Sheen, Sang Kwang Lee, Eun-Hye Choi, Tong Jin Chun, Seong-wook Kang, Seung-Cheol Shim, Mi-Kyoung Lim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2017;8(3):179-184.   Published online June 30, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2017.8.3.04
  • 2,822 View
  • 16 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The objectives of this study were to evaluate the long-term effect of anti-platelet treatment on the radiological progression of collagen-induced arthritis in rats.

Methods

Female Lewis rats with collagen-induced arthritis were divided into three experimental groups: saline, aspirin monotherapy (n = 12), and aspirin–clopidogrel dual therapy (n = 12). Drugs were administered daily and continued up to 70 days after the induction of arthritis. The clinical arthritis index (weight, morphology score, and paw thickness) and radiological scores were evaluated.

Results

The clinical arthritis index peaked on day 20, while the radiological scores peaked on day 35. No intergroup difference was observed in the clinical arthritis index throughout the experiment. The aspirin–clopidogrel dual therapy group had a significantly higher mean radiological score than the other groups (p = 0.045) on day 35. Further treatments resulted in significantly improved radiological findings in the aspirin monotherapy and aspirin–clopidogrel dual therapy groups on day 70 but no significant improvement in the saline group.

Conclusion

Anti-platelet agent treatment improved radiological findings on day 70. These observations emphasize the importance of a future long-term study of the effects of anti-platelet agent treatment on arthritis.

Evaluation and Comparison of Molecular and Conventional Diagnostic Tests for Detecting Tuberculosis in Korea, 2013
Sang-Hee Park, Chang-Ki Kim, Hye-Ran Jeong, Hyunjin Son, Seong-Han Kim, Mi-Sun Park
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(Suppl):S3-S7.   Published online December 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.10.006
  • 1,970 View
  • 16 Download
  • 7 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
A fast and accurate diagnosis is necessary to control and eliminate tuberculosis (TB). In Korea, TB continues to be a serious public health problem. In this study, diagnostic tests on clinical samples from patients suspected to have TB were performed and the sensitivity and specificity of the various techniques were compared. The main objective of the study was to compare various diagnostic tests and evaluate their sensitivity and specificity for detecting tuberculosis.
Methods
From January 2013 to December 2013, 170,240 clinical samples from patients suspected to have TB were tested with smear microscopy, acid-fast bacilli culture, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The test results were compared and data were analyzed.
Results
A total of 8216 cultures tested positive for TB (positive detection rate, 4.8%). The contamination rate in the culture was 0.6% and the isolation rate of nontuberculous mycobacteria was 1.0%. The sensitivity and specificity of smear microscopy were 56.8% and 99.6%, respectively. The concordance rate between the solid and liquid cultures was 92.8%. Mycobacterium isolates were not detected in 0.4% of the cases in the liquid culture, whereas no Mycobacterium isolates were detected in 6.8% of the cases in the solid culture. The sensitivity and specificity of real-time PCR for the solid culture were 97.2% and 72.4%, respectively, whereas the corresponding data for the liquid culture were 93.5% and 97.2%.
Conclusion
The study results can be used to improve existing TB diagnosis procedure as well as for comparing the effectiveness of the assay tests used for detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Xpert® MTB/RIF diagnostic test for pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis in immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients: Benefits and experiences over 2 years in different clinical contexts
    Ana Paula de Oliveira Tomaz, Sonia Mara Raboni, Gislene Maria Botão Kussen, Keite da Silva Nogueira, Clea Elisa Lopes Ribeiro, Libera Maria Dalla Costa, Padmapriya P. Banada
    PLOS ONE.2021; 16(3): e0247185.     CrossRef
  • Comparative performance of the laboratory assays used by a Diagnostic Laboratory Hub for opportunistic infections in people living with HIV
    Narda Medina, Ana Alastruey-Izquierdo, Danicela Mercado, Oscar Bonilla, Juan C. Pérez, Luis Aguirre, Blanca Samayoa, Eduardo Arathoon, David W. Denning, Juan Luis Rodriguez-Tudela
    AIDS.2020; 34(11): 1625.     CrossRef
  • Multiplex PCR is a Rapid, Simple and Cheap Method for Direct Diagnosis of M. tuberculosis from Sputum Samples
    Tarig M.S. Alnour, Faisel Abuduhier , Mohammed Khatatneh , Fahad Albalawi , Khalid Alfifi , Bernard Silvala
    Infectious Disorders - Drug Targets .2020; 20(4): 495.     CrossRef
  • Naked eye detection of theMycobacterium tuberculosiscomplex by recombinase polymerase amplification-SYBR green I assays
    Nuntita Singpanomchai, Yukihiro Akeda, Kazunori Tomono, Aki Tamaru, Pitak Santanirand, Panan Ratthawongjirakul
    Journal of Clinical Laboratory Analysis.2019; 33(2): e22655.     CrossRef
  • Retropharyngeal SOL: An unusual presentation of a multifaceted entity
    Poojan Agarwal, Manju Kaushal, Shruti Dogra, Ankur Gupta, Nishi Sharma
    CytoJournal.2018; 15: 12.     CrossRef
  • Rapid Detection of Rifampicin- and Isoniazid-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis using TaqMan Allelic Discrimination
    Davood Darban-Sarokhalil, Mohammad J. Nasiri, Abbas A.I. Fooladi, Parvin Heidarieh, Mohammad M. Feizabadi
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2016; 7(2): 127.     CrossRef
  • Port site infection in laparoscopic surgery: A review of its management
    Prakash K Sasmal
    World Journal of Clinical Cases.2015; 3(10): 864.     CrossRef
Molecular Typing of Mycobacterium intracellulare Using Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis, Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis, Mycobacteria Interspersed Repetitive-Unit-Variable-Number Tandem Repeat Typing, and Multilocus Sequence Typing: Molecular Characterization and Comparison of Each Typing Methods
Semi Jeon, Nara Lim, Seungjik Kwon, Taesun Shim, Misun Park, Bum-Joon Kim, Seonghan Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(3):119-130.   Published online June 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.04.003
  • 2,081 View
  • 14 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Mycobacterium intracellulare is the major causative agent of nontuberculous mycobacteria-related pulmonary infections. The strain typing of M. intracellulare is important for the treatment and control of its infections. We compared the discrimination capacity and effective value of four different molecular typing methods.
Methods
Antibiotic susceptibility testing, hsp65 and rpoB sequencing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), mycobacteria interspersed repetitive-unit-variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MIRU-VNTR), and VNTR assay targeting 44 M. intracellulare isolates obtained from patients with pulmonary infections were performed.
Results
All the antibiotic susceptibility patterns had no association with the molecular and sequence types tested in this study; however, the molecular and sequence types were related with each other. PFGE gave best results for discriminatory capacity, followed by VNTR, MLST, and MIRU-VNTR.
Conclusion
The high discriminatory power of PFGE, VNTR, and MLST is enough for differentiating between reinfection and relapse, as well as for other molecular epidemiological usages. The MLST could be regarded as a representative classification method, because it showed the clearest relation with the sequence types.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Differential Genotyping of Mycobacterium avium Complex and Its Implications in Clinical and Environmental Epidemiology
    Jeong-Ih Shin, Sung Jae Shin, Min-Kyoung Shin
    Microorganisms.2020; 8(1): 98.     CrossRef
  • A strategy based on Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) for routine genotyping of nontuberculous mycobacteria at the clinical laboratory
    Sara Blanco-Conde, Carolina González-Cortés, Ramiro López-Medrano, Juan José Palacios-Gutiérrez, Cristina Diez-Tascón, Teresa Nebreda-Mayoral, María Josefa Sierra-García, Octavio Miguel Rivero-Lezcano
    Molecular Biology Reports.2020; 47(5): 3397.     CrossRef
  • Comparative Evaluation of Band-Based Genotyping Methods for Mycobacterium intracellulare and Its Application for Epidemiological Analysis
    Jeong-Ih Shin, Jong-Hun Ha, Dong-Hae Lee, Jeong-Gyu Choi, Kyu-Min Kim, Seung Jun Lee, Yi Yeong Jeong, Jong Deog Lee, Myunghwan Jung, Seung-Chul Baik, Woo Kon Lee, Hyung-Lyun Kang, Min-Kyoung Shin, Jung-Wan Yoo
    Microorganisms.2020; 8(9): 1315.     CrossRef
  • Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis: Past, present, and future
    Lilia Lopez-Canovas, Maximo B. Martinez Benitez, Jose A. Herrera Isidron, Eduardo Flores Soto
    Analytical Biochemistry.2019; 573: 17.     CrossRef
  • Molecular typing of Mycobacterium kansasii using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and a newly designed variable-number tandem repeat analysis
    Zofia Bakuła, Anna Brzostek, Paulina Borówka, Anna Żaczek, Izabela Szulc-Kiełbik, Agata Podpora, Paweł Parniewski, Dominik Strapagiel, Jarosław Dziadek, Małgorzata Proboszcz, Jacek Bielecki, Jakko van Ingen, Tomasz Jagielski
    Scientific Reports.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Mycobacterium paraintracellulare sp. nov., for the genotype INT-1 of Mycobacterium intracellulare
    So-Young Lee, Byoung-Jun Kim, Hong Kim, Yu-Seop Won, Che Ok Jeon, Joseph Jeong, Seon Ho Lee, Ji-Hun Lim, Seung-Heon Lee, Chang Ki Kim, Yoon-Hoh Kook, Bum-Joon Kim
    International Journal of Systematic and Evolution.2016; 66(8): 3132.     CrossRef
  • Methodological and Clinical Aspects of the Molecular Epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Other Mycobacteria
    Tomasz Jagielski, Alina Minias, Jakko van Ingen, Nalin Rastogi, Anna Brzostek, Anna Żaczek, Jarosław Dziadek
    Clinical Microbiology Reviews.2016; 29(2): 239.     CrossRef
  • Genetic diversity of clinical Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis and Mycobacterium intracellulare isolates causing pulmonary diseases recovered from different geographical regions
    Kazuya Ichikawa, Jakko van Ingen, Won-Jung Koh, Dirk Wagner, Max Salfinger, Takayuki Inagaki, Kei-ichi Uchiya, Taku Nakagawa, Kenji Ogawa, Kiyofumi Yamada, Tetsuya Yagi
    Infection, Genetics and Evolution.2015; 36: 250.     CrossRef
Prevalent Multidrug-resistant Nonvaccine Serotypes in Pneumococcal Carriage of Healthy Korean Children Associated with the Low Coverage of the Seven-valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine
Sungkyoung Lee, Ji-Hye Kim, Seong-Han Kim, Misun Park, Songmee Bae
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2013;4(6):316-322.   Published online December 31, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.10.004
  • 2,075 View
  • 13 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Our previous longitudinal multicenter-based carriage study showed that the average carriage rate of Streptococcus pneumoniae was 16.8% in 582 healthy children attending kindergarten or elementary school in Seoul, Korea. We assessed serotype-specific prevalence and antimicrobial resistance among colonizing pneumococcal isolates from young children in the era of low use of the seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7).
Methods
Serotypes were determined by an agglutination test with specific antisera or by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. An antimicrobial susceptibility test was performed with broth microdilution in Korean 96-well panels from Dade-MicroScan (Sacramento, CA, USA).
Results
Pneumococcal colonization patterns were dynamic and longterm persistent carriage was rare, which indicated a sequential turnover of pneumococcal strains. Of the 369 pneumococci (except for 23 killed isolates), 129 (34.9%) isolates were PCV7 vaccine serotypes (VTs); 213 (57.8%) isolates were nonvaccine serotypes (NVTs); and the remaining 27 (7.2%) isolates were nontypable (NT). The highest rates of multidrug resistance (MDR) were observed in VTs (86.0%; 111/129 isolates) and NVTs (70.0%; 149/213 isolates).
Conclusion
This study overall showed the frequent carriage of VTs and NVTs with MDR in healthy children attending kindergarten or elementary school. Efforts should be directed toward reducing the extensive prescription of antibiotics and using new broader vaccines to reduce the expansion of MDR strains of NVTs in our community.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Characterization of Pneumococcal Colonization Dynamics and Antimicrobial Resistance Using Shotgun Metagenomic Sequencing in Intensively Sampled South African Infants
    Rendani I. Manenzhe, Felix S. Dube, Meredith Wright, Katie Lennard, Stephanie Mounaud, Stephanie W. Lo, Heather J. Zar, William C. Nierman, Mark P. Nicol, Clinton Moodley
    Frontiers in Public Health.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Encouraging rational antibiotic use in childhood pneumonia: a focus on Vietnam and the Western Pacific Region
    Nguyen T. K. Phuong, Tran T. Hoang, Pham H. Van, Lolyta Tu, Stephen M. Graham, Ben J. Marais
    Pneumonia.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Bacterial Density, Serotype Distribution and Antibiotic Resistance of Pneumococcal Strains from the Nasopharynx of Peruvian Children Before and After Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine 7
    Christiane R. Hanke, Carlos G. Grijalva, Sopio Chochua, Mathias W. Pletz, Claudia Hornberg, Kathryn M. Edwards, Marie R. Griffin, Hector Verastegui, Ana I. Gil, Claudio F. Lanata, Keith P. Klugman, Jorge E. Vidal
    Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal.2016; 35(4): 432.     CrossRef
Estimation of the Infection Window for the 2010/2011 Korean Foot-and-Mouth Disease Outbreak
Hachung Yoon, Soon-Seek Yoon, Han Kim, Youn-Ju Kim, Byounghan Kim, Sung-Hwan Wee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2013;4(3):127-132.   Published online June 30, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.04.010
  • 2,021 View
  • 14 Download
  • 10 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study aims to develop a method for calculating infection time lines for disease outbreaks on farms was developed using the 2010/2011 foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) epidemic in the Republic of Korea.
Methods
Data on farm demography, the detection date of FMD, the clinical history for the manifestation of lesions, the presence of antibodies against FMD virus (including antibodies against the structural and nonstructural proteins of serotype O), vaccination status (O1 Manisa strain), the number of reactors and information on the slaughter of infected animals were utilized in this method.
Results
Based on estimates of the most likely infection date, a cumulative detection probability that an infected farm would be identified on a specific day was determined. Peak infection was observed between late December and early January, but peak detection occurred in mid-January. The early detection probability was highest for pigs, followed by cattle (dairy, then beef) and small ruminants. Nearly 90% of the infected pig farms were detected by Day 11 post-infection while 13 days were required for detection for both dairy and beef cattle farms, and 21 days were necessary for small ruminant (goat and deer) farms. On average, 8.1 ± 3.1 days passed prior to detecting the presence of FMD virus on a farm. The interval between infection and detection of FMD was inversely associated with the intensity of farming.
Conclusion
The results of our study emphasize the importance of intensive clinical inspection, which is the quickest method of detecting FMD infection and minimizing the damage caused by an epidemic.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A Meta-Population Model of Potential Foot-and-Mouth Disease Transmission, Clinical Manifestation, and Detection Within U.S. Beef Feedlots
    Aurelio H. Cabezas, Michael W. Sanderson, Victoriya V. Volkova
    Frontiers in Veterinary Science.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Probabilistic assessment of potential leachate leakage from livestock mortality burial pits: A supervised classification approach using a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) fitted to a groundwater quality monitoring dataset
    Hyun-Koo Kim, Kyoung-Ho Kim, Seong-Taek Yun, Junseop Oh, Ho-Rim Kim, Sun-Hwa Park, Moon-Su Kim, Tae-Seung Kim
    Process Safety and Environmental Protection.2019; 129: 326.     CrossRef
  • Using Simulated Annealing to Improve the Information Dissemination Network Structure of a Foreign Animal Disease Outbreak Response
    James D. Pleuss, Jessica L. Heier Stamm, Jason D. Ellis
    Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Managem.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Managing complexity: Simplifying assumptions of foot-and-mouth disease models for swine
    A. C. Kinsley, K. VanderWaal, M. E. Craft, R. B. Morrison, A. M. Perez
    Transboundary and Emerging Diseases.2018; 65(5): 1307.     CrossRef
  • A study on the spread of the foot-and-mouth disease in Korea in 2010/2011
    Jihyun Hwang, Changhyuck Oh
    Journal of the Korean Data and Information Science.2014; 25(2): 271.     CrossRef
  • Summing Up Again
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2014; 5(4): 177.     CrossRef
  • Atmospheric pathway: A possibility of continuous outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease in South Korea in 2010–2011
    Prueksakorn Kritana, Kim Taehyeung, Kim Hyeontae, Kim Ki Youn, Son Wongeun
    Computers and Electronics in Agriculture.2014; 108: 95.     CrossRef
  • Journal Publishing: Never Ending Saga
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2014; 5(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Roll the Dice
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2014; 5(5): 243.     CrossRef
  • Years of Epidemics (2009–2011): Pandemic Influenza and Foot-and-Mouth Disease Epidemic in Korea
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2013; 4(3): 125.     CrossRef
Multiplex Real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction Assays for Simultaneous Detection of Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Vibrio vulnificus
Jie Yeun Park, Semi Jeon, Jun Young Kim, Misun Park, Seonghan Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2013;4(3):133-139.   Published online June 30, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.04.004
  • 2,310 View
  • 23 Download
  • 15 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
A multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method was developed for the identification of three Vibrio species: Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Vibrio vulnificus.
Methods
Specific primers and probes targeting the hlyA, tlh, and vvhA genes were selected and used for multiplex real-time PCR to confirm the identification of V. cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, and V. vulnificus, respectively. This method was applied to screen Vibrio species from environmental samples and combining it with a culture-based method, its effectiveness was evaluated in comparison with culture-based methods alone.
Results
Specific PCR fragments were obtained from isolates belonging to the target species, indicating a high specificity of this multiplex real-time PCR. No cross-reactivity with the assay was observed between the tested bacteria. The sensitivity of the multiplex real-time PCR was found to have a lower limit of 104 colony-forming units/reaction for all three Vibrio species. The combination strategy raised the isolation ratio of all three Vibrio species 1.26- to 2.75-fold.
Conclusion
This assay provides a rapid, sensitive, and specific technique to detect these three Vibrio species in the environment.

Citations

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  • Current trends in polymerase chain reaction based detection of three major human pathogenic vibrios
    Sharmin Quazi Bonny, M. A. Motalib Hossain, Syed Muhammad Kamal Uddin, Thiruchelvi Pulingam, Suresh Sagadevan, Mohd Rafie Johan
    Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition.2022; 62(5): 1317.     CrossRef
  • Highly lethal Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains cause acute mortality in Penaeus vannamei post-larvae
    Feng Yang, Limei Xu, Wanzhen Huang, Fang Li
    Aquaculture.2022; 548: 737605.     CrossRef
  • Hepatopancreatic transcriptome analysis and humoral immune factor assays in red claw crayfish (Cherax quadricarinatus) provide insight into innate immunomodulation under Vibrio parahaemolyticus infection
    Duanduan Chen, Leifeng Guo, Cao Yi, Shouquan Wang, Yuanyuan Ru, Hui Wang
    Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety.2021; 217: 112266.     CrossRef
  • Molecular mechanisms of Vibrio parahaemolyticus pathogenesis
    Lingzhi Li, Hongmei Meng, Dan Gu, Yang Li, Mengdie Jia
    Microbiological Research.2019; 222: 43.     CrossRef
  • Application of digital PCR and next generation sequencing in the etiology investigation of a foodborne disease outbreak caused by Vibrio parahaemolyticus
    Ying Li, Shuang Zhang, Jie Li, Meiling Chen, Mu He, Yuanyuan Wang, Yanchun Zhang, Hongbo Jing, Hongmei Ma, Yindong Li, Lin Zhao, Hongqun Zhao, Biao Kan, Bo Pang
    Food Microbiology.2019; 84: 103233.     CrossRef
  • Cholera Outbreak due to Raw Seafood Consumption in South Korea, 2016
    Jeong Hyun Kim, Jin Lee, Sahyun Hong, Sangwon Lee, Hae-young Na, Young-Il Jeong, Eun Jin Choi, Junyoung Kim, Hyo Sun Kawk, Enhi Cho
    The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygi.2018; 99(1): 168.     CrossRef
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    Deshun Xu, Lei Ji, Xiaofang Wu, Wei Yan, Liping Chen
    Canadian Journal of Microbiology.2018; 64(11): 809.     CrossRef
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    Sara Federici, Diana I. Serrazanetti, M. Elisabetta Guerzoni, Raffaella Campana, Eleonora Ciandrini, Wally Baffone, Andrea Gianotti
    Journal of Food Science and Technology.2018; 55(2): 749.     CrossRef
  • First Case of Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Skermanella aerolata Infection Mimicking Vibrio Sepsis
    Sang Taek Heo, Ki Tae Kwon, Jeong Rae Yoo, Ji Young Choi, Keun Hwa Lee, Kwan Soo Ko
    Annals of Laboratory Medicine.2018; 38(6): 604.     CrossRef
  • Vibrio cholerae O1 with Reduced Susceptibility to Ciprofloxacin and Azithromycin Isolated from a Rural Coastal Area of Bangladesh
    Shah M. Rashed, Nur A. Hasan, Munirul Alam, Abdus Sadique, Marzia Sultana, Md. Mozammel Hoq, R. Bradley Sack, Rita R. Colwell, Anwar Huq
    Frontiers in Microbiology.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A label-free multi-functionalized graphene oxide based electrochemiluminscence immunosensor for ultrasensitive and rapid detection of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in seawater and seafood
    Yuhong Sha, Xuan Zhang, Wenrou Li, Wei Wu, Sui Wang, Zhiyong Guo, Jun Zhou, Xiurong Su
    Talanta.2016; 147: 220.     CrossRef
  • Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1 in vegetables and fish raised in wastewater irrigated fields and stabilization ponds during a non-cholera outbreak period in Morogoro, Tanzania: an environmental health study
    Yaovi M. G. Hounmanou, Robinson H. Mdegela, Tamègnon V. Dougnon, Ofred J. Mhongole, Edward S. Mayila, Joseph Malakalinga, George Makingi, Anders Dalsgaard
    BMC Research Notes.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Isolation of Vibrio vulnificus Biotype I from Disease Outbreaks on Cultured Tiger Grouper Epinephelus fuscoguttatus Forsskal, 1775
    Jumroensri Thawonsuwan, Jiraporn Kasornchandra, Patcharee Soonsan, Chantana Keawtapee
    Fish Pathology.2016; 51(Special-is): S39.     CrossRef
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    Xia Zhang, Xin-Jun Du, Chun Guan, Ping Li, Wen-Jie Zheng, Shuo Wang
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  • lolB gene, a valid alternative for qPCR detection of Vibrio cholerae in food and environmental samples
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Availability of Clean Tap Water and Medical Services Prevents the Incidence of Typhoid Fever
Deog-Yong Lee, Esther Lee, HyeMin Park, SeongHan Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2013;4(2):68-71.   Published online April 30, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.03.005
  • 2,288 View
  • 19 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective: In this study, the factors that induced a decrease in the incidence of typhoid fever were analyzed. Based on the study results, we propose a quantitative and concrete solution to reduce the incidence of typhoid fever.
Methods
We analyzed the incidence and fatality rate of typhoid fever in Korea. Tap water service rate and the number of pharmacies, which affect the incidence rate of typhoid fever, were used as environmental factors.
Results
To prevent typhoid fever in the community, it is necessary to provide clean tap water service to 35.5% of the population, with an individual requiring 173 L of clean water daily. Appropriate access to clean water (51% service coverage, 307 L) helped the population to maintain individual hygiene and food safety practices, which brought about a decrease in the incidence of typhoid fever, and subsequently a decrease in fatality rate, which was achieved twice. During the 8-year study period, the fatality rate decreased to 1% when the population has access to proper medical service.
Conclusion
The fatality rate was primarily affected by the availability of medical services as well as by the incidence of typhoid fever. However, an analysis of the study results showed that the incidence of typhoid fever was affected only by the availability of clean water through the tap water system.

Citations

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  • TIPICO X: report of the 10th interactive infectious disease workshop on infectious diseases and vaccines
    Irene Rivero-Calle, Jose Gómez-Rial, Louis Bont, Bradford D. Gessner, Melvin Kohn, Ron Dagan, Daniel C. Payne, Laia Bruni, Andrew J. Pollard, Adolfo García-Sastre, Denise L. Faustman, Albert Osterhaus, Robb Butler, Francisco Giménez Sánchez, Francisco Álv
    Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics.2021; 17(3): 759.     CrossRef
  • Progress in the overall understanding of typhoid fever: implications for vaccine development
    Peter J O’Reilly, Dikshya Pant, Mila Shakya, Buddha Basnyat, Andrew J Pollard
    Expert Review of Vaccines.2020; 19(4): 367.     CrossRef
Articleses
Resistance to Fluoroquinolone by a Combination of Efflux and Target Site Mutations in Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli Isolated in Korea
Jun-Young Kim, Se-Mi Jeon, Hyungjun Kim, Nara Lim, Mi-Sun Park, Seong-Han Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2012;3(4):239-244.   Published online December 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2012.11.002
  • 2,043 View
  • 16 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) was recently reported as a major diarrheagenic pathogen in infant and adult travelers, both in developing and developed countries. EAEC strains are known to be highly resistant to antibiotics including quinolones. Therefore in this study we have determined the various mechanisms of quinolone resistance in EAEC strains isolated in Korea.
Methods
For 26 EAEC strains highly resistant to fluoroquinolone, minimal inhibitory concentrations for fluoroquinolones were determined, mutations in the quinolone target genes were identified by PCR and sequencing, the presence of transferable quinolone resistance mechanism were identified by PCR, and the contribution of the efflux pump was determined by synergy tests using a proton pump inhibitor. The expression levels of efflux pump-related genes were identified by relative quantification using real-time PCR.
Results
Apart from two, all tested isolates had common mutations on GyrA (Ser83Leu and Ser87Gly) and ParC (Ser80Gln). Isolates EACR24 and EACR39 had mutations that have not been reported previously: Ala81Pro in ParC and Arg157Gly in GyrA, respectively. Increased susceptibility of all the tested isolates to ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin in the presence of the pump inhibitor implies that efflux pumps contributed to the resistance against fluoroquinolones. Expression of the efflux pump-related genes, tolC, mdfA, and ydhE, were induced in isolates EACR 07, EACR 29, and EACR 33 in the presence of ciprofloxacin.
Conclusion
These results indicate that quinolone resistance of EAEC strains mainly results from the combination of mutations in the target enzyme and an increased expression of efflux pump-related genes. The mutations Ala81Pro in ParC and Arg157Gly in GyrA have not been reported previously the exact influence of these mutations should be investigated further.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Detection of gyrA and parC Mutations and Prevalence of Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance Genes in Klebsiella pneumoniae
    Sawsan Mohammed Kareem, Israa MS Al-kadmy, Saba S Kazaal, Alaa N Mohammed Ali, Sarah Naji Aziz, Rabab R Makharita, Abdelazeem M Algammal, Salim Al-Rejaie, Tapan Behl, Gaber El-Saber Batiha, Mohamed A El-Mokhtar, Helal F Hetta
    Infection and Drug Resistance.2021; Volume 14: 555.     CrossRef
  • Fluoroquinolone-Transition Metal Complexes: A Strategy to Overcome Bacterial Resistance
    Mariana Ferreira, Paula Gameiro
    Microorganisms.2021; 9(7): 1506.     CrossRef
  • Frequency of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV mutations and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes among Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated from urinary tract infections in Azerbaijan, Iran
    Robab Azargun, Mohammad Hossein Soroush Barhaghi, Hossein Samadi Kafil, Mahin Ahangar Oskouee, Vahid Sadeghi, Mohammad Yousef Memar, Reza Ghotaslou
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    Shivangi Sachdeva, Raghuvamsi V. Palur, Karpagam U. Sudhakar, Thenmalarchelvi Rathinavelan
    Frontiers in Microbiology.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance in Different Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli Pathotypes Responsible for Complicated, Noncomplicated, and Traveler's Diarrhea Cases
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Enhanced Type III Secretion System Expression of Atypical Shigella flexneri II:(3)4,7(8)
Sahyun Hong, Injun Cha, Nan-Ok Kim, Seong-Han Kim, Kyung-Tae Jung, Je-Hee Lee, Dong-Wook Kim, Mi-Sun Park, Yeon-Ho Kang
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2012;3(4):222-228.   Published online December 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2012.10.002
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
We aimed at evaluating the virulence of atypical Shigella flexneri II:(3)4,7(8) by DNA microarray and invasion assay.
Methods
We used a customized S. flexneri DNA microarray to analyze an atypical S. flexneri II:(3)4,7(8) gene expression profile and compared it with that of the S. flexneri 2b strain.
Results
Approximately one-quarter of the atypical S. flexneri II:(3)4,7(8) strain genes showed significantly altered expression profiles; 344 genes were more than two-fold upregulated, and 442 genes were more than 0.5-fold downregulated. The upregulated genes were divided into the category of 21 clusters of orthologous groups (COGs), and the “not in COGs” category included 170 genes. This category had virulence plasmid genes, including the ipa-mxi-spa genes required for invasion of colorectal epithelium (type III secretion system). Quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction results also showed the same pattern in two more atypical S. flexneri II:(3)4,7(8) strains. Atypical S. flexneri II:(3)4,7(8) showed four times increased invasion activity in Caco-2 cells than that of typical strains.
Conclusion
Our results provide the intracellularly regulated genes that may be important for adaptation and growth strategies of this atypical S. flexneri.
Multiplex Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction-Based Method for the Rapid Detection of gyrA and parC Mutations in Quinolone-Resistant Escherichia coli and Shigella spp.
Junyoung Kim, Semi Jeon, Hyungjun Kim, Misun Park, Soobok Kim, Seonghan Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2012;3(2):113-117.   Published online June 30, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2012.04.004
  • 2,216 View
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  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Two real-time polymerase chain reaction assays were developed to detect mutations in codons 83 and 87 in gyrA and in codons 80 and 91 in parC, the main sites that causes quinolone resistance in pathogenic Escherichia coli and Shigella spp. isolates. These assays can be employed as a useful method for controlling infections caused by quinolone-resistant E coli and Shigella isolates.

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  • Molecular detection and Frequency of Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Escherichia coli by Multiplex Allele Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction (MAS-PCR)
    Noha Tharwat Abou El-Khier, Maysaa El Sayed Zaki
    Egyptian Journal of Basic and Applied Sciences.2020; 7(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Identification of new DNA gyrase inhibitors based on bioactive compounds from streptomyces: structure-based virtual screening and molecular dynamics simulations approaches
    Hourieh Kalhor, Solmaz Sadeghi, Mahya Marashiyan, Reyhaneh Kalhor, Sanaz Aghaei Gharehbolagh, Mohammad Reza Akbari Eidgahi, Hamzeh Rahimi
    Journal of Biomolecular Structure and Dynamics.2020; 38(3): 791.     CrossRef
  • Soft sweep development of resistance in Escherichia coli under fluoroquinolone stress
    Xianxing Xie, Ruichen Lv, Chao Yang, Yajun Song, Yanfeng Yan, Yujun Cui, Ruifu Yang
    Journal of Microbiology.2019; 57(12): 1056.     CrossRef
  • Rapid Detection of Genomic Mutations ingyrAandparCGenes ofEscherichia coliby Multiplex Allele Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction
    Sukanlayanee Onseedaeng, Panan Ratthawongjirakul
    Journal of Clinical Laboratory Analysis.2016; 30(6): 947.     CrossRef
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    J A Platts-Mills, J Liu, E R Houpt
    Mucosal Immunology.2013; 6(5): 876.     CrossRef
A Contribution of MdfA to Resistance to Fluoroquinolones in Shigella flexneri
Jun-Young Kim, Se-Mi Jeon, Hyungjun Kim, Mi-Sun Park, Seong-Han Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2011;2(3):216-217.   Published online December 31, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2011.11.049
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  • 7 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
In this study, we measured the drug resistance conferred by mdfA mutations in two Shigella flexneri strains. A mutant in mdfA genes was constructed by polymerase chain reaction–based, one-step inactivation of chromosomal genes. The antimicrobial susceptibility of parent and mutant strains to fluoroquinolones was determined by minimal inhibitory concentration (MICs). The △mdfA mutants were somewhat more susceptible to fluoroquinolones than the parent strains. The low level changes in MICs of the △mdfA mutants suggest that mdfA contributed the fluoroquinolone resistance in S flexneri. This finding found that the increased expression level of an MdfA efflux pump mediated fluoroquinolone resistance, but it is not likely a major effecter of higher resistance levels.

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Original Articles
Prevalence of Antibiotic Resistance in Escherichia coli Fecal Isolates From Healthy Persons and Patients With Diarrhea
Seung-Hak Cho, Yeong-Sik Lim, Mi-Sun Park, Seong-Han Kim, Yeon-Ho Kang
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2011;2(1):41-45.   Published online June 30, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2011.05.003
  • 2,090 View
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  • 10 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of antibiotic resistance in fecal Escherichia coli isolates from healthy persons and patients with diarrhea.
Methods
E. coli isolates (n = 428) were obtained from fecal samples of apparently healthy volunteers and hospitalized patients with diarrhea. Susceptibility patterns of isolates to 16 antimicrobial agents were determined by agar disc diffusion.
Results
Most E. coli isolates exhibited less than 10% resistance against imipenem, cefotetan, aztreonam, cefepime, cefoxitin, amikacin and netilamicin, although greater than 65% were resistant to ampicillin and tetracycline. No significant difference in resistance rates for all tested antibiotics was found between isolates from the healthy-and diarrheal-patient groups, including for multi-drug resistance (p = 0.22). The highest number of resistant antibiotics was 12 antibiotics. No significant differences in antibiotic resistance were found among the sex and age strata for isolates from healthy individuals. However, antibiotic resistance rates to cefoxitin, cefotaxime, amikacin, and netilamicin were significantly higher in the isolates of men than those of women (p < 0.05) in isolates from patients with diarrhea. Furthermore, isolates from patients with diarrhea older than 40-years of age showed higher resistance to cefepime and aztreonam (p < 0.05).
Conclusion
High resistance to the antibiotics most frequently prescribed for diarrhea was found in isolates from patients with diarrhea and apparently healthy individuals without any significant difference.

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  • Characterization and antimicrobial susceptibility of Escherichia coli isolated from healthy farm animals in Tunisia
    Salma Bessalah, John Morris Fairbrother, Imed Salhi, Ghyslaine Vanier, Touhami Khorchani, Mabrouk-Mouldi Seddik, Mohamed Hammadi
    Animal Biotechnology.2021; 32(6): 748.     CrossRef
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    Son Thi Thanh Dang, Duong Thi Quy Truong, John Elmerdahl Olsen, Nhat Thi Tran, Giang Thi Huong Truong, Hue Thi Kim Vu, Anders Dalsgaard
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    International Journal of Environmental Research an.2018; 15(4): 617.     CrossRef
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    Phuong Hoai HOANG, Sharda Prasad AWASTHI, Phuc DO NGUYEN, Ngan Ly Hoang NGUYEN, Dao Thi Anh NGUYEN, Ninh Hoang LE, Chinh VAN DANG, Atsushi HINENOYA, Shinji YAMASAKI
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  • Possibility of CTX-M-14 Gene Transfer from Shigella sonnei to a Commensal Escherichia coli Strain of the Gastroenteritis Microbiome
    Seung-Hak Cho, Soon Young Han, Yeon-Ho Kang
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  • Prevalence of Antimicrobial Resistance in Escherichia coli Strains Isolated from Fishery Workers
    Hyun-Ho Shin, Seung-Hak Cho
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  • The Road Less Traveled
    Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2011; 2(1): 1.     CrossRef
Genotypic Characterization of Vibrio vulnificus Clinical Isolates in Korea
Hye Sook Jeong, Jun Young Kim, Se Mi Jeon, Mi Sun Park, Seong Han Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2011;2(1):8-14.   Published online June 30, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2011.04.008
  • 2,083 View
  • 15 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Vibrio vunificus is known to cause septicemia and severe wound infections in patients with chronic liver diseases or an immuno-compromised condition. We carried out the molecular characterization of V. vulnificus isolates from human Vibrio septicemia cases based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) using NotI and SfiI.
Methods
and Results PFGE was used to characterize a total of 78 strains from clinical cases after NotI or SfiI digestion. The geographical distribution of PFGE patterns for the strains from the southern part of Korea, a high-risk region for Vibrio septicemia, indicated that the isolates from southeastern Korea showed a comparatively higher degree of homology than those from southwestern Korea.
Conclusions
We report the genetic distribution of V. vulnficus isolated from Vibrio septicemia cases during 2000–2004 in Korea. This method has potential use as a subspecies-typing tool for V. vulnificus strains isolated from distant geographic regions.

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  • Effect of Seawater Temperature Increase on the Occurrence of Coastal Vibrio vulnificus Cases: Korean National Surveillance Data from 2003 to 2016
    Jungsook Kim, Byung Chul Chun
    International Journal of Environmental Research an.2021; 18(9): 4439.     CrossRef
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    Caroline D’Souza, Ballamoole Krishna Kumar, Sachidananda Kapinakadu, Ranjith Shetty, Indrani Karunasagar, Iddya Karunasagar
    International Journal of Infectious Diseases.2018; 68: 74.     CrossRef
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    Hye-Jin Kim, Jae-Chang Cho, Paul J Planet
    PLOS ONE.2015; 10(11): e0142657.     CrossRef
  • The Road Less Traveled
    Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2011; 2(1): 1.     CrossRef
Distribution of Virulence Genes and Their Association of Serotypes in Pathogenic Escherichia coli Isolates From Diarrheal Patients in Korea
Seung-Hak Cho, Kyung-Hwan Oh, Seong-Han Kim, Hee-Bok Oh, Mi-Sun Park
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2010;1(1):29-35.   Published online December 31, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2010.12.008
  • 2,273 View
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  • 6 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
To characterise the genetic and serological diversity of pathogenic Escherichia coli, we tested 111 E coli strains isolated from diarrhoeal patients in Korea between 2003 and 2006.
Methods
The isolates were tested through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and slide agglutination method for the detection of virulence genes and serotypes, respectively. To compare the expression of Shiga toxin (stx)-1 and stx2 genes, real-time quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR and rapid exprssion assay, reversed-passive latex agglutination, were performed.
Results
Forty-nine Shiga toxin-producing E coli (STEC) strains and 62 non-STEC strains, including 20 enteropathogenic E coli, 20 enterotoxigenic E coli, 20 enteroaggregative E coli, and 2 enteroinvasive E coli were randomly chosen from the strains isolated from diarrhoeal patients in Korea between 2003 and 2006. PCR analysis indicated that locus of enterocyte effacement pathogenicity island, that is, eaeA, espADB, and tir genes were present in STEC, enteropathogenic E coli, and enteroinvasive E coli. Quorum sensing-related gene luxS was detected in most of pathogenic E coli strains. Major serotypes of the STEC strains were O157 (26%) and O26 (20%), whereas the non-STEC strains possessed various serotypes. Especially, all the strains with serotype O157 carried stx2 and the tested virulence factors. Of the STEC strains, the data of real-time quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR and reversed-passive latex agglutination tests showed that messenger RNA- and protein expression of stx2 gene were higher than those of stx1 gene.
Conclusion
Our results provide the epidemiological information regarding the trend of STEC and non-STEC infections in the general population and show the fundamental data in association of serotypes with virulence genes in diarrhoeagenic E coli strains from Korea.

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PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives