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Volume 2(3); December 2011
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Is the Public Transportation System Safe from a Public Health Perspective?
Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2011;2(3):149-150.   Published online December 31, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2011.11.037
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  • 22 Download
  • 1 Citations
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  • Physical distancing on public transport in Mumbai, India: Policy and planning implications for unlock and post-pandemic period
    Neenu Thomas, Arnab Jana, Santanu Bandyopadhyay
    Transport Policy.2022; 116: 217.     CrossRef
Neutralizing Antibody Responses and Evolution of the Viral Envelope in the Course of HIV-1 Korean Clade B Infection
Bo Gyeong Shin, Mi-Ran Yun, Sung Soon Kim, Gab Jung Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2011;2(3):151-157.   Published online December 31, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2011.11.038
  • 1,989 View
  • 19 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
HIV is able to continuously adapt to and evade the evolving neutralizing antibody responses of the host. We investigated the ability of HIV variants to evade neutralizing antibodies in order to understand the distinct characteristics of HIV-1 Korean clade B.
Methods
Three drug-naive subjects were enrolled in this study who were infected with HIV-1 Korean clade B. Neutralizations were performed using autologous plasma and pseudovirion-based assays in order to analyze and compare changes in the env gene.
Results
In the early phase of infection, neutralizing activities against autologous virus variants gradually increased, which was followed by a decline in the humoral immune response against the subsequent viral escape variants. The amino acids lengths and number of potential N-linked glycosylation sites (PNGS) in HIV-1 env gene was positively correlated with neutralized antibody responses during the early stages of infection.
Conclusion
This study suggests that change within the env domains over the course of infection influences reactivities to neutralized antibodies and may also have an impact on host immune responses. This is the first longitudinal study of HIV-1 humoral immunity that took place over the entire course of HIV-1 Korean clade B infection.

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  • Blockage of CD59 Function Restores Activities of Neutralizing and Nonneutralizing Antibodies in Triggering Antibody-Dependent Complement-Mediated Lysis of HIV-1 Virions and Provirus-Activated Latently Infected Cells
    Kai Yang, Jie Lan, Nicole Shepherd, Ningjie Hu, Yanyan Xing, Daniel Byrd, Tohti Amet, Corlin Jewell, Samir Gupta, Carole Kounga, Jimin Gao, Qigui Yu, G. Silvestri
    Journal of Virology.2015; 89(18): 9393.     CrossRef
Longitudinal and Cross-Sectional Genetic Diversity in the Korean Peninsula Based on the P vivax Merozoite Surface Protein Gene
Jung-Yeon Kim, Eun-Jung Suh, Hyo-Soon Yu, Hyun-Sik Jung, In-Ho Park, Yien-Kyeoug Choi, Kyoung-Mi Choi, Shin-Hyeong Cho, Won-Ja Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2011;2(3):158-163.   Published online December 31, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2011.11.039
  • 1,870 View
  • 15 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Vivax malaria has reemerged and become endemic in Korea. Our study aimed to analyze by both longitudinal and cross-sectional genetic diversity of this malaria based on the P vivax Merozoite Surface Protein (PvMSP) gene parasites recently found in the Korean peninsula.
Methods
PvMSP-1 gene sequence analysis from P vivax isolates (n = 835) during the 1996-2010 period were longitudinally analyzed and the isolates from the Korean peninsula through South Korea, the demilitarized zone and North Korea collected in 2008-2010 were enrolled in an overall analysis of MSP-1 gene diversity.
Results
New recombinant subtypes and severe multiple-cloneinfection rates were observed in recent vivax parasites. Regional variation was also observed in the study sites.
Conclusion
This study revealed the great complexity of genetic variation and rapid dissemination of genes in P vivax. It also showed interesting patterns of diversity depending, on the region in the Korean Peninsula. Understanding the parasiteninsula. Under genetic variation may help to analyze trends and assess the extent of endemic malaria in Korea.

Citations

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  • Molecular surveillance over 14 years confirms reduction of Plasmodium vivax and falciparum transmission after implementation of Artemisinin-based combination therapy in Papua, Indonesia
    Zuleima Pava, Agatha M. Puspitasari, Angela Rumaseb, Irene Handayuni, Leily Trianty, Retno A. S. Utami, Yusrifar K. Tirta, Faustina Burdam, Enny Kenangalem, Grennady Wirjanata, Steven Kho, Hidayat Trimarsanto, Nicholas M. Anstey, Jeanne Rini Poespoprodjo,
    PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.2020; 14(5): e0008295.     CrossRef
  • Distribution of Antibodies Specific to the 19-kDa and 33-kDa Fragments of Plasmodium vivax Merozoite Surface Protein 1 in Two Pathogenic Strains Infecting Korean Vivax Malaria Patients
    Sylvatrie-Danne Dinzouna-Boutamba, Sanghyun Lee, Ui-Han Son, Su-Min Song, Hye Soo Yun, So-Young Joo, Dongmi Kwak, Man Hee Rhee, Dong-Il Chung, Yeonchul Hong, Youn-Kyoung Goo
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2016; 7(4): 213.     CrossRef
  • The unique distribution of the Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein 1 in parasite isolates with short and long latent periods from the Republic of Korea
    Youn-Kyoung Goo, Jun-Hye Moon, So-Young Ji, Dong-Il Chung, Yeonchul Hong, Shin-Hyung Cho, Won-Ja Lee, Jung-Yeon Kim
    Malaria Journal.2015;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of single nucleotide polymorphisms of pvmdr1 and microsatellite genotype in Plasmodium vivax isolates from Republic of Korea military personnel
    Dong-Il Chung, Sookwan Jeong, Sylvatrie-Danne Dinzouna-Boutamba, Hye-Won Yang, Sang-Geon Yeo, Yeonchul Hong, Youn-Kyoung Goo
    Malaria Journal.2015;[Epub]     CrossRef
Alterations of gyrA, gyrB, and parC and Activity of Efflux Pump in Fluoroquinolone-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii
Sunok Park, Kyeong Min Lee, Yong Sun Yoo, Jung Sik Yoo, Jae Il Yoo, Hwa Su Kim, Yeong Seon Lee, Gyung Tae Chung
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2011;2(3):164-170.   Published online December 31, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2011.11.040
  • 1,971 View
  • 15 Download
  • 29 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study investigated the fluoroquinolone-resistant mechanism of 56 clinical cases of A baumannii infection from 23 non-tertiary hospitals, collected between 2004 and 2006.
Methods
Susceptibility testing was performed by broth microdilution and Epsilometer test. Analyses of quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) were done by sequencing. The activity of the efflux pump was measured using inhibitors.
Results
The sequences from selected 56 isolates were divided into seven groups (I-VII) on the basis of mutations in gyrA (S83L), parC (S80L, S80W and S84K) and gyrB (containing the novel mutations E679D, D644Y and A677V). The 27 isolates with triple mutations in gyrA, gyrB and parC (groups IV-VII) showed higher levels of resistance to ciprofloxacin (minimal inhibitory concentration [MIC] of 16-256 μg/mL) than the 26 isolates with double mutations in gyrA and parC (groups II and III, MIC of 8-64 μ g/mL; p < 0.05). Alterations in the efflux pump were observed in four isolates with the parC S80L mutation (group II) or E84K mutation (group VII), but no effect was observed in an isolate with the parC S80 W mutation (group III).
Conclusion
These results suggest that triple mutations in clinical isolates of A baumannii contribute to the development of high levels of resistance to fluoroquinolones and that mutations in parC S80L or E84K (groups II and VII) may contribute to alterations in efflux pump activity in A baumannii.

Citations

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  • Development of Nanoparticle Adaptation Phenomena in Acinetobacter baumannii: Physiological Change and Defense Response
    Oliver McNeilly, Riti Mann, Max Laurence Cummins, Steven P. Djordjevic, Mehrad Hamidian, Cindy Gunawan, Victor Gonzalez
    Microbiology Spectrum.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Deepak Kumar, Chaitali Singhal, Manisha Yadav, Pooja Joshi, Priyanka Patra, Subhash Tanwar, Amitava Das, Sumit Kumar Pramanik, Susmita Chaudhuri
    Frontiers in Microbiology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Danaboina Srikanth, Swanand Vinayak Joshi, Mahammad Ghouse Shaik, Gaurav Pawar, Sushmitha Bujji, Vinaykumar Kanchupalli, Sidharth Chopra, Srinivas Nanduri
    Bioorganic Chemistry.2022; 124: 105849.     CrossRef
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    Subhasree Roy, Vivek Junghare, Shanta Dutta, Saugata Hazra, Sulagna Basu, Christopher W. Marshall
    mSystems.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Antimicrobial Resistance, Integron Carriage, and Fluoroquinolone Resistance Genes in Acinetobacte baumannii Isolates
    Parastoo Ashouri, Jafar Mohammadshahi, Vajihe Sadat Nikbin, Hadi Peeridogaheh, Behnam Mohammadi-Ghalehbin, Soheila Refahi, Amir Teimourpour, Majid Esmaelizad, Hafez Mirzaneghad, Roghayeh Teimourpour
    Archives of Clinical Infectious Diseases.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Efflux pumps in multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii: Current status and challenges in the discovery of efflux pumps inhibitors
    Privita Verma, Monalisa Tiwari, Vishvanath Tiwari
    Microbial Pathogenesis.2021; 152: 104766.     CrossRef
  • Overexpression of Efflux Pumps, Mutations in the Pumps’ Regulators, Chromosomal Mutations, and AAC(6′)-Ib-cr Are Associated With Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Diverse Sequence Types of Neonatal Septicaemic Acinetobacter baumannii: A 7-Year Single Center S
    Subhasree Roy, Somdatta Chatterjee, Amrita Bhattacharjee, Pinaki Chattopadhyay, Bijan Saha, Shanta Dutta, Sulagna Basu
    Frontiers in Microbiology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Shared and Unique Evolutionary Trajectories to Ciprofloxacin Resistance in Gram-Negative Bacterial Pathogens
    Jaime E. Zlamal, Semen A. Leyn, Mallika Iyer, Marinela L. Elane, Nicholas A. Wong, James W. Wamsley, Maarten Vercruysse, Fernando Garcia-Alcalde, Andrei L. Osterman, Igor B. Zhulin
    mBio.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Efflux Pump Activity and Mutations Driving Multidrug Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii at a Tertiary Hospital in Pretoria, South Africa
    Noel-David Nogbou, Granny M. Nkawane, Khanyisa Ntshane, Charles K. Wairuri, Dikwata T. Phofa, Kagiso K. Mokgokong, Mbudzeni Ramashia, Maphoshane Nchabeleng, Lawrence C. Obi, Andrew M. Musyoki, Todd R. Callaway
    International Journal of Microbiology.2021; 2021: 1.     CrossRef
  • The effect of the efflux pump inhibitor Carbonyl Cyanide m-Chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) on the susceptibility to imipenem and cefepime in clinical strains of Acinetobacter baumannii
    Alejandra Sanchez-Carbonel, Belén Mondragón, Nicolás López-Chegne, Isaac Peña-Tuesta, Gladys Huayan-Dávila, Dora Blitchtein, Hugo Carrillo-Ng, Wilmer Silva-Caso, Miguel Angel Aguilar-Luis, Juana del Valle-Mendoza, Iddya Karunasagar
    PLOS ONE.2021; 16(12): e0259915.     CrossRef
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    Yu-Kuo Tsai, Ci-Hong Liou, Jung-Chung Lin, Chang-Phone Fung, Feng-Yee Chang, L. Kristopher Siu
    International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents.2020; 55(4): 105918.     CrossRef
  • Antibiotic Resistance Profiles, Molecular Mechanisms and Innovative Treatment Strategies of Acinetobacter baumannii
    Corneliu Ovidiu Vrancianu, Irina Gheorghe, Ilda Barbu Czobor, Mariana Carmen Chifiriuc
    Microorganisms.2020; 8(6): 935.     CrossRef
  • Bacterial Genome Wide Association Studies (bGWAS) and Transcriptomics Identifies Cryptic Antimicrobial Resistance Mechanisms in Acinetobacter baumannii
    Chandler Roe, Charles H. D. Williamson, Adam J. Vazquez, Kristen Kyger, Michael Valentine, Jolene R. Bowers, Paul D. Phillips, Veronica Harrison, Elizabeth Driebe, David M. Engelthaler, Jason W. Sahl
    Frontiers in Public Health.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Balaram Khamari, Manmath Lama, Chanakya Pachi Pulusu, Amarendra Pratap  Biswal, Sai Manoz Lingamallu, Bhargava Sai Mukkirla, Amit Kumar Sahoo, Harioum Sambhu Narayan Dash, Rewa Sharda, Prakash Kumar, Eswarappa Pradeep Bulagonda
    Medical Principles and Practice.2020; 29(6): 580.     CrossRef
  • Using WGS to identify antibiotic resistance genes and predict antimicrobial resistance phenotypes in MDR Acinetobacter baumannii in Tanzania
    Happiness H Kumburu, Tolbert Sonda, Marco van Zwetselaar, Pimlapas Leekitcharoenphon, Oksana Lukjancenko, Blandina T Mmbaga, Michael Alifrangis, Ole Lund, Frank M Aarestrup, Gibson S Kibiki
    Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.2019; 74(6): 1484.     CrossRef
  • Phenotypic and Genotypic Characterization of Acinetobacter spp. Panel Strains: A Cornerstone to Facilitate Antimicrobial Development
    Roshan D'Souza, Naina A. Pinto, Nguyen Le Phuong, Paul G. Higgins, Thao Nguyen Vu, Jung-Hyun Byun, Young Lag Cho, Jong Rak Choi, Dongeun Yong
    Frontiers in Microbiology.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii: Resistance by Any Other Name Would Still be Hard to Treat
    David A. Butler, Mark Biagi, Xing Tan, Samah Qasmieh, Zackery P. Bulman, Eric Wenzler
    Current Infectious Disease Reports.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Molecular Study of Quinolone Resistance Determining Regions of gyrA Gene and parC Genes in Clinical Isolates of Acintobacter baumannii Resistant to Fluoroquinolone
    Maysaa El Sayed Zaki, Nermen Abou ElKheir, Mohamed Mofreh
    The Open Microbiology Journal.2018; 12(1): 116.     CrossRef
  • Species distribution, virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance ofAcinetobacterspp. isolates from dogs and cats: a preliminary study
    Yui Kimura, Kazuki Harada, Takae Shimizu, Tomomi Sato, Akari Kajino, Masaru Usui, Yutaka Tamura, Yuzo Tsuyuki, Tadashi Miyamoto, Asami Ohki, Masahisa Watarai
    Microbiology and Immunology.2018; 62(7): 462.     CrossRef
  • Multiple mechanisms contributing to ciprofloxacin resistance among Gram negative bacteria causing infections to cancer patients
    Samira M. Hamed, Walid F. Elkhatib, Hadir A. El-Mahallawy, Mai M. Helmy, Mohamed S. Ashour, Khaled M. A. Aboshanab
    Scientific Reports.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    S. Yilmaz, I. Yalcin, S. Okten, F. K. Onurdag, E. Aki-Yalcin
    SAR and QSAR in Environmental Research.2017; 28(11): 941.     CrossRef
  • Antibacterial Resistance in Ureaplasma Species and Mycoplasma hominis Isolates from Urine Cultures in College-Aged Females
    Marissa A. Valentine-King, Mary B. Brown
    Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    A. N. Vaganova
    Russian Journal of Infection and Immunity.2017; 7(3): 231.     CrossRef
  • Alarmingly High Segregation Frequencies of Quinolone Resistance Alleles within Human and Animal Microbiomes Are Not Explained by Direct Clinical Antibiotic Exposure
    Wesley Field, Ruth Hershberg
    Genome Biology and Evolution.2015; 7(6): 1743.     CrossRef
  • Multidrug-resistant Acinetobactor baumannii isolated from a traveler returned from Brunei
    Masayoshi Tojo, Momoko Mawatari, Kayoko Hayakawa, Maki Nagamatsu, Kayo Shimada, Kazuhisa Mezaki, Yuko Sugiki, Emi Kuroda, Nozomi Takeshita, Satoshi Kutsuna, Yoshihiro Fujiya, Tohru Miyoshi-Akiyama, Teruo Kirikae, Norio Ohmagari
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  • Correlation of Ciprofloxacin Resistance with the AdeABC Efflux System in Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Isolates
    Abdollah Ardebili, Abdolaziz Rastegar Lari, Malihe Talebi
    Annals of Laboratory Medicine.2014; 34(6): 433.     CrossRef
  • Effect of Efflux Pump Inhibitor Carbonyl Cyanide 3-Chlorophenylhydrazone on the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration of Ciprofloxacin in Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Isolates
    Abdollah Ardebili, Malihe Talebi, Leila Azimi, Abdolaziz Rastegar Lari
    Jundishapur Journal of Microbiology.2014;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Characterization of Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Isolates Carrying blaOXA-23 Carbapenemase and 16S rRNA Methylase armA genes in Yemen
    Sofiane Bakour, Samer Ahmed Alsharapy, Abdelaziz Touati, Jean-Marc Rolain
    Microbial Drug Resistance.2014; 20(6): 604.     CrossRef
  • First report of 16S rRNA methylase ArmA-producing Acinetobacter baumannii and rapid spread of metallo-β-lactamase NDM-1 in Algerian hospitals
    Sofiane Bakour, Abdelaziz Touati, Taous Bachiri, Farida Sahli, Djamel Tiouit, Malek Naim, Mounia Azouaou, Jean-Marc Rolain
    Journal of Infection and Chemotherapy.2014; 20(11): 696.     CrossRef
Cyclophilin A Cpr1 Protein Modulates the Response of Antioxidant Molecules to Menadione-induced Oxidative Stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae KNU5377Y
Il-Sup Kim, Haesun Yun, Ingnyol Jin, Ho-Sung Yoon
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2011;2(3):171-177.   Published online December 31, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2011.11.041
  • 1,743 View
  • 14 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The cellular function of cyclophilin A (CypA) differs between organisms, even though CypA is conserved in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the role of activated CypA isoform CPR1 in the antioxidative mechanisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under menadione (MD)-induced oxidative stress.
Methods
Four S. cerevisiae strains, KNU5377Y (kwt) and BY4741 (bwt), and their isogenic cpr1⊿ mutant strains (kc1 and bc1), were treated with MD, at a concentration ranging between 0.25 and 0.4 mM. Cpr1-mediated antioxidative effects were analyzed by measuring the levels of cellular glutathione (GSH) and ascorbate (AsA)-like molecules in yeast.
Results
GSH and AsA-like reductant molecule concentrations were more reduced in the presence of MD in the kc1 strain than in the kwt strain; whereas, there was no significant difference between the bwt and bc1 strains under the same conditions. In kc1 strain samples, we observed a reduction in the expression of proteins related both to GSH synthesis and the recycling system, and simultaneously, downregulation of GSH synthetase and GSH reductase activities were also evident. Oxidative stress in the kc1 strain was alleviated by the application of the GSH and AsA analog.
Conclusion
These results indicate that activated Cpr1 modulates the response of antioxidant molecules involved in cellular redox homeostasis of KNU5377Y during oxidative stress induced by MD.
The Emergence of Oseltamivir-Resistant Seasonal Influenza A (H1N1) Virus in Korea During the 2008-2009 Season
Woo-Young Choi, Inseok Yang, Sujin Kim, Namjoo Lee, Meehwa Kwon, Joo-Yeon Lee, Chun Kang
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2011;2(3):178-185.   Published online December 31, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2011.11.042
  • 1,956 View
  • 13 Download
  • 10 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
To monitor antiviral drug resistance among seasonal influenza viruses isolated in Korea during the 2008-2009 influenza season, we examined influenza isolates collected through Korea Influenza Surveillance Scheme for antiviral drug susceptibility.
Methods
For genetic analysis of antiviral drug resistance, the matrix (M2) and neuraminidase (NA) genes of each isolate were amplified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and followed by nucleotide sequencing. For phylogenetic analyses, the sequences of hemagglutinin (HA) and NA genes of each isolate were aligned using multiple alignment program. For phenotypic analysis of antiviral drug resistance, drug susceptibilities against M2 inhibitor (amantadine) and NA inhibitors (oseltavimir and zanamivir) were determined by virus yield reduction assay and fluorometric NA inhibition assay, respectively.
Results
In Korea, the resistant influenza viruses against oseltamivir were first detected in sealsonal influenza A(H1N1) viruses on Week 48 of 2008. Since then, the number of oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1) viruses was continuously increased and had reached the highest peak on Week 52 of 2008. 533 (99.8%) of 534 A(H1N1) viruses were resistant to oseltamivir and all of them harbored the H275Y mutation in the NA gene during the 2008-2009 season. The oseltamivir resistance identified by sequencing was confirmed by NA inhibition assay. Genetic analysis based on HA gene of the resistant A(H1N1) viruses revealed that the viruses were identified as A/Brisbane/10/2007-like strain which was vaccine strain for the 2008-2009 season.
Conclusions
The oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1) viruses were first emerged in Europe in November 2007 and then circulated globally. One year later, the oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1) viruses were first detected in Korea in November 2008 and continued circulating until the Week 7 of 2009 during the 2008-2009 season. Considering the pandemic preparedness, it should be continued to monitor the emergence and the characterization of antiviral drug resistant influenza viruses.

Citations

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  • Pharmacokinetics and safety of a novel influenza treatment (baloxavir marboxil) in Korean subjects compared with Japanese subjects
    Yun Kim, Sangwon Lee, Yohan Kim, In‐Jin Jang, SeungHwan Lee
    Clinical and Translational Science.2022; 15(2): 422.     CrossRef
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    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2013; 4(4): 177.     CrossRef
  • How to Manage a Public Health Crisis and Bioterrorism in Korea
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2013; 4(5): 223.     CrossRef
  • Generation and Characterization of Recombinant Influenza A(H1N1) Viruses Resistant to Neuraminidase Inhibitors
    WooYoung Choi, Jin-Young Shin, Hwan-Eui Jeong, Mi-Jin Jeong, Su-Jin Kim, Joo-Yeon Lee, Chun Kang
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    Seoung Geun Kim, Yoon Ha Hwang, Yung Hae Shin, Sung Won Kim, Woo Sik Jung, Sung Mi Kim, Jae Min Oh, Na Young Lee, Mun Ju Kim, Kyung Soon Cho, Yeon Gyeong Park, Sang Kee Min, Chang Kyu Lee, Jun Sub Kim, Chun Kang, Joo Yeon Lee, Man Kyu Huh, Chang Hoon Kim
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Serum MicroRNA Expression Profiling in Mice Infected with Rabies Virus
Myung Guk Han, Jun-Sun Park, Cho Soon Lee, Young Eui Jeong, Jung Sang Ryou, Jung Eun Cho, Young Ran Ju, Kyoung-Ki Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2011;2(3):186-191.   Published online December 31, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2011.11.043
  • 2,266 View
  • 18 Download
  • 6 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Serum or plasma microRNAs (miRNAs) are potential biomarkers for the diagnosis for cancer and prenatal diseases. This study was conducted to investigate whether rabies virus causes a change in serum miRNA expression.
Methods
ICR mice were intramuscularly inoculated with rabies virus and were sacrificed weekly to collect serum and brain tissue for 4 weeks postinoculation. Mice were assigned to four groups based on the results of indirect immunofluorescent assays, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and nested reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and the expression profiles of serum miRNAs were compared using a commercial mouse miRNA expression profiling assay.
Results
The expression levels of miRNAs changed significantly with the different stages of the disease. The expression level of 94 serum miRNAs in infected mice changed at least twofold. Seven microRNAs of them were significantly upregulated or downregulated in all infected mice regardless of disease status. The number of miRNAs with an expression level change decreased with the progression of the disease. In a hierarchical cluster analysis, infected mice clustered into a group separate from uninfected control mice.
Conclusions
Based on the relationship of miRNAs to gene expression regulation, miRNAs may be candidates for the study of viral pathogenesis and could have potential as biomarkers.

Citations

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    Wen Zhao, Jingyin Su, Ningning Wang, Naiyu Zhao, Shuo Su
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    Christopher Cowled, Chwan-Hong Foo, Celine Deffrasnes, Christina L. Rootes, David T. Williams, Deborah Middleton, Lin-Fa Wang, Andrew G. D. Bean, Cameron R. Stewart
    Scientific Reports.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Systems Biomedicine of Rabies Delineates the Affected Signaling Pathways
    Sadegh Azimzadeh Jamalkandi, Sayed-Hamidreza Mozhgani, Hamid Gholami Pourbadie, Mehdi Mirzaie, Farshid Noorbakhsh, Behrouz Vaziri, Alireza Gholami, Naser Ansari-Pour, Mohieddin Jafari
    Frontiers in Microbiology.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
Food and Nutrient Intakes According to Income in Korean Men and Women
Inyoung Hur, Myoung-Jin Jang, Kyungwon Oh
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2011;2(3):192-197.   Published online December 31, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2011.11.044
  • 1,959 View
  • 17 Download
  • 15 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The present study investigated associations between income and intake of nutrients and food in adults (n = 11,063) from the fourth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007–2009.
Methods
To examine relationships between individual dietary intake and anthropometric measures and family income, multiple linear regression models were constructed for each outcome variable. All models were adjusted for age, education, energy intake, smoking, body mass index, and physical activity.
Results
For men, intakes of protein, calcium, phosphorus, potassium, and vitamin C were lower in low-income compared to high-income groups. For women, intakes of protein and niacin were lower in low-income groups. Lowest income group ate less dairy products in men and less fruits and fishes or shellfishes in women.
Conclusion
Low-income groups had severe food insecurity and low diet quality compared to high-income groups. The study results will provide direction for public health efforts regarding dietary intakes according to economic status among Korean men and women.

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  • The nutrition transition, food retail transformations, and policy responses to overnutrition in the East Asia region: A descriptive review
    Oliver Huse, Erica Reeve, Phillip Baker, Daniel Hunt, Colin Bell, Anna Peeters, Kathryn Backholer
    Obesity Reviews.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Relationship between Nutrient Intake and Hearing Loss According to the Income Level of Working-Aged Adults: A Korean National Health and Nutrition Survey
    Juhyung Lee, Ji-Hyeon Lee, Chulyoung Yoon, Chanbeom Kwak, Jae-Joon Ahn, Tae-Hoon Kong, Young-Joon Seo
    Nutrients.2022; 14(8): 1655.     CrossRef
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    Gyu-Hee Park, Jung-Hee Cho, Donglim Lee, Yangha Kim
    Nutrients.2022; 14(22): 4864.     CrossRef
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    Min Gyeong Kang, Sung-Min Yook, Ji-Yun Hwang
    Nutrients.2021; 13(3): 851.     CrossRef
  • Association of Household Income Level with Vitamin and Mineral Intake
    Haegyu Oh, Juyeon Kim, Yune Huh, Seung Hoon Kim, Sung-In Jang
    Nutrients.2021; 14(1): 38.     CrossRef
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    Min Hee Lee, Jeong‐Won Park, Yu‐Jin Kwon
    Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology.2020; 48(5): 371.     CrossRef
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    Jeong-Hwa Choi, Young-Ran Heo
    Journal of Nutrition and Health.2019; 52(3): 277.     CrossRef
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    Boyoung Park, Jinhee Lee, Jeongseon Kim
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    Natasha Hurree, Dhandevi Pem, Suress Bhagwant, Rajesh Jeewon
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    Hye-Sung Kim, Young-Youn Kim, Jeong-Kyu Oh, Kwang-Hak Bae, Alberto G Passi
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  • Association of Some Vitamins and Minerals with Periodontitis in a Nationally Representative Sample of Korean Young Adults
    Ji-A Park, Jung-Hwa Lee, Hyo-Jin Lee, Bo-Hyoung Jin, Kwang-Hak Bae
    Biological Trace Element Research.2017; 178(2): 171.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic Disparities in the Prevalence of Blepharoptosis in the South Korean Adult Population Based on a Nationwide Cross-Sectional Study
    Eun Young Rha, Kyungdo Han, Yongkyu Park, Gyeol Yoo, David O. Carpenter
    PLOS ONE.2016; 11(1): e0145069.     CrossRef
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    Shinyoung Jun, Sangah Shin, Hyojee Joung
    British Journal of Nutrition.2016; 115(3): 480.     CrossRef
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    Natasha Hurree, Rajesh Jeewon
    Current Research in Nutrition and Food Science Jou.2016; 4(Special-Is): 08.     CrossRef
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    So-Ra Kim, Kyungdo Han, Jin-Young Choi, Jennifer Ersek, Junxiu Liu, Sun-Jin Jo, Kang-Sook Lee, Hyeon Woo Yim, Won-Chul Lee, Yong Gyu Park, Seung-Hwan Lee, Yong-Moon Park, C. Mary Schooling
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Prevalence of Farm and Slaughterhouse Workers Carrying Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli in Korea
Sahyun Hong, Seung Eun Song, Kyung Hwan Oh, Seung Hak Kim, Seok ju Yoo, Hyun Sul Lim, Mi Sun Park
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2011;2(3):198-201.   Published online December 31, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2011.11.045
  • 1,922 View
  • 13 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of Shiga toxin (Stx) gene-positive stool samples from dairy farmer and slaughterhouse workers in Gyeonggi-Do province.
Methods
A total of 621 samples from healthy farmers and 198 samples from slaughterhouse workers were screened by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) infection on stool samples.
Results
The PCR product of Stx-encoding genes was detected in 21 (3.4%) of 621 farmers and 15 (7.6%) of 198 slaughterhouse workers’ stool samples. Distribution of the Stx PCR positive workers by age increment revealed an increase in STEC infection with age increment in both workers. Distribution of the Stx PCR positive workers by working years revealed an increase in STEC infection with working years in farmers.
Conclusion
These results of the study show that slaughterhouse workers are at higher risk of STEC infection than farmers. In addition, slaughterhouse workers have a more potential source of food contamination of STEC and transmission.

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  • Prevalence and characteristics of Shiga toxin-producingEscherichia coli(STEC) from cattle in Korea between 2010 and 2011
    Eun Kang, Sun Young Hwang, Ka Hee Kwon, Ki Yeon Kim, Jae Hong Kim, Yong Ho Park
    Journal of Veterinary Science.2014; 15(3): 369.     CrossRef
A diversity of Antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus spp. in a Public Transportation System
Pamela J. Yeh, Dawn M. Simon, Jess A. Millar, H. Forrest Alexander, Darleen Franklin
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2011;2(3):202-209.   Published online December 31, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2011.11.047
  • 2,682 View
  • 17 Download
  • 11 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Our goal was to determine the diversity and abundance of Staphylococcus bacteria on different components of a public transportation system in a mid-sized US city (Portland, Oregon) and to examine the level of drug resistance in these bacteria.
Methods
We collected 70 samples from 2 cm × 4 cm sections from seven different areas on buses and trains in Portland, USA, taking 10 samples from each area. We isolated a subset of 14 suspected Staphylococcus spp. colonies based on phenotype, and constructed a phylogeny from16S rRNA sequences to assist in identification. We used the Kirbye–Bauer disk diffusion method to determine resistance levels to six common antibiotics.
Results
We found a range of pathogenic Staphylococcus species. The mean bacterial colony counts were 97.1 on bus and train floors, 80.1 in cloth seats, 9.5 on handrails, 8.6 on seats and armrests at bus stops, 3.8 on the underside of seats, 2.2 on windows, and 1.8 on vinyl seats per 8 cm2 sample area. These differences were significant (p < 0.001). Of the 14 isolates sequenced, 11 were staphylococci, and of these, five were resistant to penicillin and ampicillin, while only two displayed intermediate resistance to bacitracin. All 11 isolates were sensitive to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, vancomycin, and tetracycline.
Conclusions
We found six different strains of Staphylococcus, and while there were varying levels of drug resistance, we did not find extensive levels of multidrug-resistant bacteria, and no S. aureus was found. We found floors and cloth seats to be areas on buses and trains that showed particularly high levels of bacteria.

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    Ah-Mee Park, Sundar Khadka, Fumitaka Sato, Seiichi Omura, Mitsugu Fujita, Kazuki Hashiwaki, Ikuo Tsunoda
    Scientific Reports.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Prevalence, Characteristics, and Epidemiology of Microbial Hand Contamination Among Minnesota State Fair Attendees (2014)
    Meghan R. Mason, Bozena M. Morawski, Ruby L. Bayliss, Fatuma M. Noor, Sagal H. Jama, Connie L. Clabots, James R. Johnson
    Frontiers in Public Health.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Zhi-Yu Zou, Lei Lei, Qi-Yan Chen, Yong-Qiang Wang, Chang Cai, Wan-Qi Li, Zan Zhang, Bing Shao, Yang Wang
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    Adi Idris, Ron R. Cutler
    Central European Journal of Public Health.2019; 27(4): 340.     CrossRef
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    Lewis Lee, Van M. Savage, Pamela J. Yeh
    Computational and Structural Biotechnology Journal.2018; 16: 307.     CrossRef
  • A molecular epidemiological study of methicillin-resistantStaphylococcienvironmental contamination in railway stations and coach stations in Guangzhou of China
    J.L. Lin, Y. Peng, Q.T. Ou, D.X. Lin, Y. Li, X.H. Ye, J.L. Zhou, Z.J. Yao
    Letters in Applied Microbiology.2017; 64(2): 131.     CrossRef
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    Ko S. Chong, Siti A. Shazali, Zhen Xu, Ronald R. Cutler, Adi Idris
    Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Infectious Disea.2016; 2016: 1.     CrossRef
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    Jialing Lin, Dongxin Lin, Ping Xu, Ting Zhang, Qianting Ou, Chan Bai, Zhenjiang Yao
    Environmental Research.2016; 150: 528.     CrossRef
  • Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in public transportation vehicles (buses): Another piece to the epidemiologic puzzle
    Jonathan K. Lutz, Joany van Balen, John Mac Crawford, John R. Wilkins, Jiyoung Lee, Rocio C. Nava-Hoet, Armando E. Hoet
    American Journal of Infection Control.2014; 42(12): 1285.     CrossRef
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    Feng Zhou, Yuyan Wang
    International Journal of Environmental Research an.2013; 10(6): 2412.     CrossRef
  • Is the Public Transportation System Safe from a Public Health Perspective?
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2011; 2(3): 149.     CrossRef
Sensitivity Analysis of the Parameters of Korea’s Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Plan
Chaeshin Chu, Junehawk Lee, Dong Hoon Choi, Seung-Ki Youn, Jong-Koo Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2011;2(3):210-215.   Published online December 31, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2011.11.048
  • 2,095 View
  • 17 Download
  • 10 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Our aim was to evaluate Korea’s Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Plan.
Methods
We conducted a sensitivity analysis on the expected number of outpatients and hospital bed occupancy, with 1,000,000 parameter combinations, in a situation of pandemic influenza, using the mathematical simulation program InfluSim.
Results
Given the available resources in Korea, antiviral treatment and social distancing must be combined to reduce the number of outpatients and hospitalizations sufficiently; any single intervention is not enough. The antiviral stockpile of 4–6% is sufficient for the expected eligible number of cases to be treated. However, the eligible number assumed (30% for severe cases and 26% for extremely severe cases) is very low compared to the corresponding number in European countries, where up to 90% of the population are assumed to be eligible for antiviral treatment.
Conclusions
A combination of antiviral treatment and social distancing can mitigate a pandemic, but will only bring it under control for the most optimistic parameter combinations.

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    Weizhen Xie, Stephen Campbell, Weiwei Zhang
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    Chaeshin Chu, Sunmi Lee
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  • Doing Mathematics with Aftermath of Pandemic Influenza 2009
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2015; 6(1): 1.     CrossRef
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    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2014; 5(4): 177.     CrossRef
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    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2013; 4(3): 125.     CrossRef
  • Public Health Crisis Preparedness and Response in Korea
    Hye-Young Lee, Mi-Na Oh, Yong-Shik Park, Chaeshin Chu, Tae-Jong Son
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2013; 4(5): 278.     CrossRef
  • Was the Mass Vaccination Effective During the Influenza Pandemic 2009–2010 in Korea?
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2013; 4(4): 177.     CrossRef
  • How to Manage a Public Health Crisis and Bioterrorism in Korea
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2013; 4(5): 223.     CrossRef
A Contribution of MdfA to Resistance to Fluoroquinolones in Shigella flexneri
Jun-Young Kim, Se-Mi Jeon, Hyungjun Kim, Mi-Sun Park, Seong-Han Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2011;2(3):216-217.   Published online December 31, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2011.11.049
  • 2,023 View
  • 16 Download
  • 7 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
In this study, we measured the drug resistance conferred by mdfA mutations in two Shigella flexneri strains. A mutant in mdfA genes was constructed by polymerase chain reaction–based, one-step inactivation of chromosomal genes. The antimicrobial susceptibility of parent and mutant strains to fluoroquinolones was determined by minimal inhibitory concentration (MICs). The △mdfA mutants were somewhat more susceptible to fluoroquinolones than the parent strains. The low level changes in MICs of the △mdfA mutants suggest that mdfA contributed the fluoroquinolone resistance in S flexneri. This finding found that the increased expression level of an MdfA efflux pump mediated fluoroquinolone resistance, but it is not likely a major effecter of higher resistance levels.

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PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives