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Volume 12(4); August 2021
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Editorial
How to deal with the Delta variant this fall
Jong-Koo Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(4):201-202.   Published online August 26, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0217
  • 4,344 View
  • 74 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
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Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A Possible Type IV Hypersensitivity Reaction to Older Antiepileptic Drugs During and After Recovery from COVID-19 Infection
    Mohsen Khosravi
    Pharmacopsychiatry.2022; 55(01): 58.     CrossRef
  • Points to consider for COVID-19 vaccine quality control and national lot release in Republic of Korea: focus on a viral vector platform
    Jung Hun Ju, Naery Lee, Sun-hee Kim, Seokkee Chang, Misook Yang, Jihyun Shin, Eunjo Lee, Sunhwa Sung, Jung-Hwan Kim, Jin Tae Hong, Ho Jung Oh
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2022; 13(1): 4.     CrossRef
  • Broad humoral and cellular immunity elicited by one-dose mRNA vaccination 18 months after SARS-CoV-2 infection
    Chang Kyung Kang, Hyun Mu Shin, Pyoeng Gyun Choe, Jiyoung Park, Jisu Hong, Jung Seon Seo, Yung Hie Lee, Euijin Chang, Nam Joong Kim, Minji Kim, Yong-Woo Kim, Hang-Rae Kim, Chang-Han Lee, Jun-Young Seo, Wan Beom Park, Myoung-don Oh
    BMC Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Impact of national Covid-19 vaccination Campaign, South Korea
    Seonju Yi, Young June Choe, Do Sang Lim, Hye Roen Lee, Jia Kim, Yoo-Yeon Kim, Ryu Kyung Kim, Eun Jung Jang, Sangwon Lee, Eunjoo Park, Seung-Jin Kim, Young-Joon Park
    Vaccine.2022; 40(26): 3670.     CrossRef
  • Recent increase in the detection of human parainfluenza virus during the coronavirus disease-2019 pandemic in the Republic of Korea
    Heui Man Kim, Jee Eun Rhee, Nam-Joo Lee, Sang Hee Woo, Ae Kyung Park, Jaehee Lee, Cheon Kwon Yoo, Eun-Jin Kim
    Virology Journal.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Review Articles
Scrutiny of COVID-19 response strategies among severely affected European nations
Shine Stephen, Alwin Issac, Rakesh Vadakkethil Radhakrishnan, Jaison Jacob, VR Vijay, Sam Jose, SM Azhar, Anoop S. Nair, Nadiya Krishnan, Rakesh Sharma, Manju Dhandapani
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(4):203-214.   Published online July 29, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0068
  • 11,053 View
  • 134 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 8 Crossref
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Although the health care systems in Europe are considered the global benchmark, European nations were severely affected by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. This manuscript aimed to examine the strategies implemented to combat the COVID-19 pandemic by France, the United Kingdom, Spain, Italy, Germany, and Russia and their outcomes in terms of the number of cases, testing, and deaths. This is the first review of its kind that extensively analyzes the preparedness, mitigation, and response strategies against the COVID-19 pandemic adopted by these nations. This paper further suggests a strategic preparedness model for future pandemics. From the analysis, we found that a decentralized approach, prompt decision-making and timely execution, coordination between local health authorities, and public participation in the implementation of strategies could substantially reduce the case fatality rate. Nations with a high percentage of gross domestic product invested in the health sector, as well as more nurses, physicians, hospital beds, intensive care unit beds, and ventilators, better managed the pandemic. Instead, nations that postponed their pandemic response by delaying tracking, tracing, testing, quarantine, and lockdown were badly affected. The lessons learned from the present pandemic could be used as a guide to prepare for further pandemics.

Citations

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  • Psychological impact and development of autistic traits in children during the COVID 19 Pandemic: A study through Guardian
    Waseem Iqbal, Mudassir Hassan, Parveez Ahmed Mir, Syed Kaiser
    IP International Journal of Medical Paediatrics an.2024; 9(4): 135.     CrossRef
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    Narinder Singh, Jaswinder Singh, Vikram Bhandari, Rahat Kumar
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  • A phenomenological experience of trainers in preparedness training during COVID-19 pandemic: Trainers perspective from tertiary care institute
    Rakesh Sharma, Prasuna Jelly, Kusum Kumari, Arun Varghese, K. Hemanthkumar, C. Vasantha Kalyani, Neha Singh, Shalinee Rao
    International Journal of Africa Nursing Sciences.2024; 20: 100711.     CrossRef
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    Javaid Ahmad Mir, Asmat Parveen, Suheel Rashid Wani, Tayyibah Nisar, Sakeena Majeed, Wahida Kausar, Basit Ul Islam
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  • Strategy to prevent infection from Covid-19 among security officers of tertiary care centre: A preexperimental study
    Rakesh Sharma, KusumK Rohilla, Lisa Chadha, Priyanka Malhotra, S Sharmila, Prasuna Jelly
    Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care.2021; 10(9): 3257.     CrossRef
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    Nahid Iftikhar, Shalini Dixit, Aditi Yadav
    IP International Journal of Medical Paediatrics an.2021; 7(3): 155.     CrossRef
  • A comparative study of attitudes towards COVID-19 vaccination in the rural and urban population of Uttarakhand, India
    Rakesh Sharma, Prasuna Jelly, Vishwas AS, Lisa Chadha, Vartika Saxena, Latika Mohan
    Journal of Global Health Economics and Policy.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
COVID-19 prediction models: a systematic literature review
Sheikh Muzaffar Shakeel, Nithya Sathya Kumar, Pranita Pandurang Madalli, Rashmi Srinivasaiah, Devappa Renuka Swamy
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(4):215-229.   Published online August 13, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0100
  • 9,149 View
  • 197 Download
  • 19 Web of Science
  • 17 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
As the world grapples with the problem of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and its devastating effects, scientific groups are working towards solutions to mitigate the effects of the virus. This paper aimed to collate information on COVID-19 prediction models. A systematic literature review is reported, based on a manual search of 1,196 papers published from January to December 2020. Various databases such as Google Scholar, Web of Science, and Scopus were searched. The search strategy was formulated and refined in terms of subject keywords, geographical purview, and time period according to a predefined protocol. Visualizations were created to present the data trends according to different parameters. The results of this systematic literature review show that the study findings are critically relevant for both healthcare managers and prediction model developers. Healthcare managers can choose the best prediction model output for their organization or process management. Meanwhile, prediction model developers and managers can identify the lacunae in their models and improve their data-driven approaches.

Citations

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  • The Telemedicine Demand Index and its Utility in Managing COVID-19 Case Surges
    Martin Yong Kwong Lee, Kie Beng Goh, Deanna Xiuting Koh, Si Jack Chong, Raymond Swee Boon Chua
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    Persefoni Talimtzi, Antonios Ntolkeras, Georgios Kostopoulos, Konstantinos I. Bougioukas, Eirini Pagkalidou, Andreas Ouranidis, Athanasia Pataka, Anna-Bettina Haidich
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  • AI-powered COVID-19 forecasting: a comprehensive comparison of advanced deep learning methods
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Original Articles
The current status of sexually transmitted infections in South Korean children in the last 10 years
Yumi Jang, Eunjung Oh
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(4):230-235.   Published online August 4, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0046
  • 5,616 View
  • 122 Download
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study aimed to determine the status of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in children in South Korea between 2010 and 2019), as well as to establish preventive maintenance guidelines to reduce the incidence of STIs in children.
Methods
Data reports from 590 STI surveillance systems in community clinics, hospital-level medical institutions with urology or obstetrics/gynecology departments and public hospitals between 2010 and 2019 in the integrative disease management system of the Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency as of December 2020 were analyzed.
Results
A total of 172,645 cases of STIs were reported over the 10-year period (2010–2019), of which 2,179 cases (1.26%) represented STIs in children below the age of 18 years. A higher incidence of infections was observed in girls (1,499 cases, 68.79%) than in boys (680 cases, 31.21%). The STIs that had the highest incidence were, in descending order, chlamydia (997 cases, 45.75%), gonorrhea (592 cases, 27.17%), genital warts (338 cases, 15.51%), genital herpes (250 cases, 11.47%), and chancroid (2 cases, 0.09%). In adolescents aged 14 to 17 years, chlamydia, genital herpes, and gonorrhea were most frequently reported. Genital warts, in particular, have been consistently reported in children below the age of 14 years.
Conclusion
Children must be protected legally and institutionally from sexual abuse. Specific management protocols for STIs in children must be established by local governments and associated organizations. National human papillomavirus vaccination programs should be expanded to include boys, and anti-STI educational efforts using modern media should be implemented.
Perceptions of the COVID-19 vaccine and willingness to receive vaccination among health workers in Nigeria
Oluseyi Ademola Adejumo, Olorunfemi Akinbode Ogundele, Cynthia Roli Madubuko, Rosena Olubanke Oluwafemi, Ogochukwu Chinedum Okoye, Kenechukwu Chukwuemeka Okonkwo, Sunday Samson Owolade, Oladimeji Adedeji Junaid, Olutoyin Morenike Lawal, Adenike Christianah Enikuomehin, Maureen Iru Ntaji, Aisha Sokunbi, Aina Omodele Timothy, Olatunji Sunday Abolarin, Emmanuel Olalekan Ali, John Oghenevwirhe Ohaju-Obodo
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(4):236-243.   Published online July 19, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0023
  • 12,223 View
  • 460 Download
  • 38 Web of Science
  • 37 Crossref
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The study aimed to examine health workers’ perceptions of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine in Nigeria and their willingness to receive the vaccine when it becomes available.
Methods
This multi-center cross-sectional study used non-probability convenience sampling to enroll 1,470 hospital workers aged 18 and above from 4 specialized hospitals. A structured and validated self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. Data entry and analysis were conducted using IBM SPSS ver. 22.0.
Results
The mean age of respondents was 40±6 years. Only 53.5% of the health workers had positive perceptions of the COVID-19 vaccine, and only slightly more than half (55.5%) were willing to receive vaccination. Predictors of willingness to receive the COVID-19 vaccine included having a positive perception of the vaccine (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 4.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.50−5.69), perceiving a risk of contracting COVID-19 (AOR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.25–3.98), having received tertiary education (AOR, 3.50; 95% CI, 1.40−6.86), and being a clinical health worker (AOR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.01−1.68).
Conclusion
Perceptions of the COVID-19 vaccine and willingness to receive the vaccine were sub-optimal among this group. Educational interventions to improve health workers' perceptions and attitudes toward the COVID-19 vaccine are needed.

Citations

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    Betty B. B. Ackah, Michael Woo, Lisa Stallwood, Zahra A. Fazal, Arnold Okpani, Ugochinyere Vivian Ukah, Prince A. Adu
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    Gete Berihun, Zebader Walle, Daniel Teshome, Leykun Berhanu, Mohammed Derso
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    Abayomi Samuel Oyekale
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  • Associations between COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy and the experience of violence among women and girls living with and at risk of HIV in Nigeria
    Morenike Oluwatoyin Folayan, Olujide Arije, Amaka Enemo, Aaron Sunday, Amira Muhammad, Hasiya Yunusa Nyako, Rilwan Mohammed Abdullah, Henry Okiwu, Erik Lamontagne
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    Grace Ben Inah, Samuel Archibong Efanga, Ekaete Vincent Ukpong, Christiana Ifeyinwa Obiora
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    Zerihun Figa, Tesfaye Temesgen, Addisu Getnet Zemeskel, Moges Ganta, Asrat Alemu, Mesfin Abebe, Zemachu Ashuro
    Public Health in Practice.2022; 4: 100343.     CrossRef
  • Perception and willingness to accept COVID-19 Vaccines: A cross-sectional survey of the general population of Sokoto State, Nigeria
    Oche Mansur Oche, Habibullah Adamu, Musa Yahaya, Hudu Garba Illo, Abdulaziz Mohammad Danmadami, Adamu Ijapa, Asmau Mohammad Wali, Hamza Yusuf, Hafsat Muhammad, Abba Aji, Harapan Harapan
    PLOS ONE.2022; 17(12): e0278332.     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 vaccination acceptance among community members and health workers in Ebonyi state, Nigeria: study protocol for a concurrent-independent mixed method analyses of intention to receive, timeliness of the intention to receive, uptake and hesitancy to
    Ugwu I Omale, Osarhiemen Iyare, Richard L Ewah, Chidinma I Amuzie, Onyinyechukwu U Oka, Victor U Uduma, Azuka S Adeke, Cordis O Ikegwuonu, Olaedo O Nnachi, Okechukwu O Ukpabi, Ifeyinwa M Okeke, Glory E Nkwo, Ugochi IA Nwali
    BMJ Open.2022; 12(12): e061732.     CrossRef
  • Drivers of COVID-19 Vaccine Uptake amongst Healthcare Workers (HCWs) in Nigeria
    Sohail Agha, Adaobi Chine, Mathias Lalika, Samikshya Pandey, Aparna Seth, Alison Wiyeh, Alyssa Seng, Nandan Rao, Akhtar Badshah
    Vaccines.2021; 9(10): 1162.     CrossRef
Behavioral therapy and pharmacotherapy for relapse prevention in abstinent smokers: a rapid review and meta-analysis for the Korea Preventive Service Task Force
Naae Lee, Eon Sook Lee, Jae Moon Yun, Cheol Min Lee, Seung-Won Oh, Younglee Choi, Belong Cho
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(4):244-253.   Published online July 6, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0017
  • 6,261 View
  • 100 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of relapse prevention interventions involving behavioral and pharmacological treatment among abstinent smokers.
Methods
This rapid review was conducted using MEDLINE, Cochrane CENTRAL, CINAHL, Embase, KMbase, and KoreaMed to identify studies published until June 20, 2020. The participants were abstinent smokers who quit smoking on their own, due to pregnancy, hospitalization, or by participating in a smoking cessation program. We found a systematic review that fit the objective of this study and included 81 randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Studies that did not present information on smoking cessation status, had no control group, or used reward-based interventions were excluded. Random effect and fixed effect meta-analyses were used to estimate the relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). In subgroup analyses, differences between subgroups were verified based on the participant setting, characteristics, intervention type, and intensity.
Results
Following screening, 44 RCTs were included in the meta-analysis. The review reported no differences in the success rate of relapse prevention between the behavioral interventions. Pharmacotherapy interventions showed higher success rates (RR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.05−1.26; I2=40.71%), depending on prior abstinence duration and the drug type. Conclusions: The results indicated that pharmacotherapy has a significant effect on preventing relapse among abstinent smokers.

Citations

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  • A Survey of the Clinical Practice of Korean Medicine for Smoking Cessation in Public Health Centers: A Web-Based Survey of Public Health Doctors of Korean Medicine
    Gyoungeun Park, Jeong-Hyun Moon, Eun-Jung Kim, Byung-Kwan Seo, Yong-Hyeon Baek, Won-Suk Sung
    Perspectives on Integrative Medicine.2024; 3(1): 45.     CrossRef
Validity and reliability of the Health-Related Quality of Life Instrument with 8 Items (HINT-8) in Korean breast cancer patients
Juyoung Kim, Min-Woo Jo, Hyeon-Jeong Lee, Sei-Hyun Ahn, Byung Ho Son, Jong Won Lee, Sae Byul Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(4):254-263.   Published online August 5, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0005
  • 7,117 View
  • 132 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
This study evaluated the validity and reliability of the Health-Related Quality of Life Instrument with 8 Items (HINT-8) in postoperative breast cancer patients in South Korea.
Methods
The study included 300 breast cancer patients visiting a tertiary hospital. We measured health-related quality of life (HRQoL) using the HINT-8, the 5-level EQ-5D version (EQ-5D-5L), and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast (FACT-B). Discriminatory ability, known-group validity, and convergent validity were assessed. Reliability was evaluated with the Cohen kappa, weighted kappa, and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC).
Results
The EQ-5D-5L indexes (p<0.001) and EQ visual analogue scale (VAS) scores (p<0.001) were significantly higher in subjects with no problems in each item of the HINT-8 than in those with problems. The FACT-B total scores were also higher in subjects without problems on the HINT-8. Older age, lower education level, and comorbidities were associated with a lower HINT-8 index. The HINT-8 index was correlated with the EQ-5D-5L index and the EQ VAS, with correlation coefficients of 0.671 (p<0.001) and 0.577 (p<0.001), respectively. The correlation coefficients between the HINT-8 and the FACT-B ranged from 0.390 to 0.714. The ICC was 0.690 (95% confidence interval, 0.580–0.780).
Conclusion
The HINT-8 showed appropriate validity for capturing HRQoL in postoperative breast cancer patients.

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  • Health-related quality of life of premenopausal young breast cancer survivors undergoing endocrine therapy
    Kyungmi Lee, Hye Suk Jun
    European Journal of Oncology Nursing.2024; 68: 102496.     CrossRef
  • Smartphone application-based rehabilitation in patients with chronic respiratory and cardiovascular diseases
    Chiwook Chung, Ah-Ram Kim, Dongbum Kim, Hee Kwon, Seong Ho Lee, Il-Young Jang, Min-Woo Jo, Do-Yoon Kang, Sei Won Lee
    Scientific Reports.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Health‐related quality of life instrument with 8 items to measure health‐related quality of life among family caregivers of people with dementia: A pilot validation study
    Eunjeong Choi, Hyun‐Ju Seo, IL Han Choo, Seong Min Kim, Jeong Min Park, Yu Mi Choi
    Public Health Nursing.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Willingness to pay for integrative healthcare services to treat sleep disturbances: Evidence from a nationwide survey
    Min Kyung Hyun
    European Journal of Integrative Medicine.2023; 58: 102223.     CrossRef
  • Internal Structure of the Health-Related Quality of Life Instrument with 8-Items in a Nationally Representative Population
    Eun-Hyun Lee
    Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing.2023; 53(3): 359.     CrossRef
  • Factors influencing health-related quality of life for young single-person households: the mediating effect of resilience
    Soo Jin Lee, Sujin Lee, Xianglan Jin
    Journal of Korean Biological Nursing Science.2023; 25(3): 160.     CrossRef
  • Smartphone application-based rehabilitation in patients with chronic respiratory and cardiovascular diseases: a randomised controlled trial study protocol
    Chiwook Chung, Ah-Ram Kim, Il-Young Jang, Min-Woo Jo, Seongho Lee, Dongbum Kim, Hee Kwon, Do-Yoon Kang, Sei Won Lee
    BMJ Open.2023; 13(9): e072698.     CrossRef
  • Health-related quality of life among cancer patients and survivors and its relationship with current employment status
    Woorim Kim, Kyu-Tae Han, Seungju Kim
    Supportive Care in Cancer.2022; 30(5): 4547.     CrossRef
  • Associations between Food Groups and Health-Related Quality of Life in Korean Adults
    Shamirah Nabbosa, Sunghee Lee
    Nutrients.2022; 14(17): 3643.     CrossRef
  • Validity of the Health-Related Quality of Life Instrument with 8 Items (HINT-8) in the Korean Elderly: A Cross-Sectional Study
    Seon-Ha Kim, Miok Kim
    Journal of Korean Gerontological Nursing.2022; 24(3): 248.     CrossRef
Brief Reports
COVID-19 vaccine safety monitoring in the Republic of Korea: February 26, 2021 to April 30, 2021
Hyun-kyung Oh, Eun Kyeong Kim, Insob Hwang, Tae Eun Kim, Yeon-kyeong Lee, Eunju Lee, Yeon-Kyeng Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(4):264-268.   Published online August 13, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0157
  • 6,279 View
  • 148 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
On February 26, 2021, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccination was started for high-priority groups based on the recommendation of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices with 2 available COVID-19 vaccines (AstraZeneca and Pfizer-BioNTech) in Korea. This report provides a summary of adverse events following COVID-19 vaccination as of April 30, 2021.
Methods
Adverse events following immunization are notifiable by medical doctors to the Korea Immunization Management System (KIMS) under the national surveillance system. We analyzed all adverse events reports following COVID-19 vaccination to the KIMS from February 26 to April 30, 2021.
Results
In total, 16,196 adverse events following 3,586,814 administered doses of COVID-19 vaccines were reported in approximately 2 months (February 26 to April 30, 2021). Of these, 15,658 (96.7%) were non-serious adverse events, and 538 (3.3%) were serious adverse events, including 73 (0.5%) deaths. The majority of adverse events (n=13,063, 80.7%) were observed in women, and the most frequently reported adverse events were myalgia (52.2%), fever (44.9%), and headache (34.9%). Of the 73 deaths following the COVID-19 vaccination, none were related to the vaccines.
Conclusion
By April 30, 3.6 million doses of the COVID 19 vaccine had been given in Korea, and the overwhelming majority of reports were for non-serious events. The Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency continues to monitor the safety of COVID-19 vaccination.

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  • A prospective cohort study protocol: monitoring and surveillance of adverse events following heterologous booster doses of Oxford AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine in previous recipients of two doses of Sinopharm or Sputnik V vaccines in Iran
    Shahin Soltani, Behzad Karami Matin, Mohammad Mehdi Gouya, Sayed Mohsen Zahraei, Ghobad Moradi, Omid Chehri, Moslem Soofi, Mehdi Moradinazar, Fatemeh Khosravi Shadmani, Mahsa Kalantari, Hamidreza Khajeha, Mohammad Hassan Emamian, Farid Najafi
    BMC Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Herpes Zoster Reactivation After mRNA and Adenovirus-Vectored Coronavirus Disease 2019 Vaccination: Analysis of National Health Insurance Database
    Jin Gu Yoon, Young-Eun Kim, Min Joo Choi, Won Suk Choi, Yu Bin Seo, Jaehun Jung, Hak-Jun Hyun, Hye Seong, Eliel Nham, Ji Yun Noh, Joon Young Song, Woo Joo Kim, Dong Wook Kim, Hee Jin Cheong
    The Journal of Infectious Diseases.2023; 228(10): 1326.     CrossRef
  • Safety and effectiveness of BNT162b2 mRNA Covid-19 vaccine in adolescents
    Young June Choe, Seonju Yi, Insob Hwang, Jia Kim, Young-Joon Park, Eunhee Cho, Myoungyoun Jo, Hyunju Lee, Eun Hwa Choi
    Vaccine.2022; 40(5): 691.     CrossRef
  • Direct and Indirect Associations of Media Use With COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy in South Korea: Cross-sectional Web-Based Survey
    Minjung Lee, Myoungsoon You
    Journal of Medical Internet Research.2022; 24(1): e32329.     CrossRef
  • Self-Reported COVID-19 Vaccines’ Side Effects among Patients Treated with Biological Therapies in Saudi Arabia: A Multicenter Cross-Sectional Study
    Lama T AlMutairi, Wesal Y Alalayet, Sondus I Ata, Khalidah A Alenzi, Yazed AlRuthia
    Vaccines.2022; 10(6): 977.     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 vaccine safety monitoring in Republic of Korea from February 26, 2021 to October 31, 2021
    Insob Hwang, Kyeongeun Park, Tae Eun Kim, Yunhyung Kwon, Yeon-Kyeng Lee
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2021; 12(6): 396.     CrossRef
The laboratory test procedure to confirm rotavirus vaccine infection in severe complex immunodeficiency patients
Su-Jin Chae, Seung-Rye Cho, Wooyoung Choi, Myung-Guk Han, Deog-Yong Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(4):269-273.   Published online August 13, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0079
  • 5,053 View
  • 94 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
The rotavirus vaccine is a live vaccine, and there is a possibility of infection by the virus strain used in the vaccine. We investigated the process of determining whether an infection was caused by the vaccine strain in a severe complex immunodeficiency (SCID) patient with rotavirus infection. The patient was vaccinated with RotaTeq prior to being diagnosed with SCID. The testing process was conducted in the following order: confirming rotavirus infection, determining its genotype, and confirming the vaccine strain. Rotavirus infection was confirmed through enzyme immunoassay and VP6 gene detection. G1 and P[8] were identified by multiplex polymerase chain reaction for the genotype, and G3 was further identified using a single primer. By detecting the fingerprint gene (WC3) of RotaTeq, it was confirmed that the detected virus was the vaccine strain. Genotypes G1 and P[8] were identified, and the infection was suspected of having been caused by rotavirus G1P[8]. G1P[8] is the most commonly detected genotype worldwide and is not included in the recombinant strains used in vaccines. Therefore, the infection was confirmed to have been caused by the vaccine strain by analyzing the genetic relationship between VP4 and VP7. Rotavirus infection by the vaccine strain can be identified through genotyping and fingerprint gene detection. However, genetic linkage analysis will also help to identify vaccine strains.

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives