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Volume 10(6); December 2019
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Editorial
One Bite Away
Hae-Wol Cho
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2019;10(6):325-326.   Published online December 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2019.10.6.01
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Original Articles
Prevalence and Associated Factors of Hypertension Subtypes Among the Adult Population in Nepal: Evidence from Demographic and Health Survey Data
Rajat Das Gupta, Animesh Talukdar, Shams Shabab Haider, Mohammad Rifat Haider
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2019;10(6):327-336.   Published online December 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2019.10.6.02
Correction in: Osong Public Health Res Perspect 2022;13(1):80
  • 7,177 View
  • 110 Download
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study aims to determine the prevalence, and associated factors of undiagnosed hypertension [Systolic Diastolic Hypertension (SDH), Isolated Systolic Hypertension (ISH) and Isolated Diastolic Hypertension (IDH)] in the Nepalese adult population.

Methods

Nepal Demographic and Health Survey 2016 data from adults (≥ 18 years) was used in this study. The final weighted sample size was 13,393. Blood pressure (BP) was measured 3 times and the average of the second and third measurement was reported. SDH (systolic BP (SBP) ≥ 140 mmHg and diastolic BP (DBP) ≥ 90 mmHg), ISH (SBP ≥ 140 mmHg and DBP < 90 mmHg), and IDH (SBP < 140 mmHg and DBP ≥ 90 mmHg) were measured. Multilevel logistic regression analyses were conducted to find the association between the independent variables and the covariates.

Results

The prevalence of SDH, IDH and ISH were 8.1%, 7.5%, and 3.3% respectively. The odds of having SDH and ISH increased with old age. However, the odds of having IDH decreased with increasing age. Females has lower odds of having SDH and IDH compared with male participants. Individuals that had been married, resided in Province 4 (p < 0.05) or 5 (p < 0.01) were statistically significantly associated with having IDH. Being overweight or obese was statistically significantly associated with all 3 HTN subtypes (p < 0.001).

Conclusion

The necessary steps should be taken so that public health promotion programs in Nepal may prevent and control undiagnosed hypertension.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Hypertension subtypes at high altitude in Peru: Analysis of the Demographic and Family Health Survey 2016–2019
    Brando Ortiz-Saavedra, Elizbet S. Montes-Madariaga, Oscar Moreno-Loaiza, Carlos J. Toro-Huamanchumo, Esteban Ortiz-Prado
    PLOS ONE.2024; 19(4): e0300457.     CrossRef
  • Structural And Functional State Of Various Zones Of Skin Microcirculation In Men With Isolated Diastolic Hypertension
    Andrei I. Korolev, Andrei A. Fedorovich, Aleksander Yu. Gorshkov, Valida A. Dadaeva, Mikhail G. Chaschin, Anna V. Strelkova, Ksenia V. Omelyanenko, Maria A. Mikhailova, Oxana M. Drapkina
    Russian Open Medical Journal.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Correction to “Prevalence and Associated Factors of Hypertension Subtypes Among the Adult Population in Nepal: Evidence from Demographic and Health Survey Data” [Osong Public Health Res Perspect 2019;10(6):327–36]
    Rajat Das Gupta, Animesh Talukder, Shams Shabab Haider, Mohammad Rifat Haider
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2022; 13(1): 80.     CrossRef
  • Is Isolated Diastolic Hypertension an Important Phenotype?
    Cesar A. Romero, Aldo H. Tabares, Marcelo Orias
    Current Cardiology Reports.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Relationship between cigarette smoking and blood pressure in adults in Nepal: A population-based cross-sectional study
    Renqiao Lan, Max K. Bulsara, Prakash Dev Pant, Hilary Jane Wallace, Palash Chandra Banik
    PLOS Global Public Health.2021; 1(11): e0000045.     CrossRef
Distribution of Pathogenic Vibrio Species in the Coastal Seawater of South Korea (2017–2018)
Seung Hun Lee, Hee Jung Lee, Go Eun Myung, Eun Jin Choi, In A Kim, Young Il Jeong, Gi Jun Park, Sang Moon Soh
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2019;10(6):337-342.   Published online December 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2019.10.6.03
  • 5,758 View
  • 183 Download
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Pathogenic Vibrio species are widely distributed in warm estuarine and coastal environments, and can infect humans through the consumption of raw or mishandled contaminated seafood and seawater. For this reason, the distribution of these bacteria in South Korea was investigated.

Methods

Seawater samples were collected from 145 coastal area points in the aquatic environment in which Vibrio species live. Environmental data (i.e., water temperature, salinity, turbidity, and atmospheric temperature) was collected which may help predict the distribution of the species (data not shown). Seawater samples were filtered, and incubated overnight in alkaline peptone water, at 37°C. Using species-specific polymerase chain reaction methods, screening tests were performed for the hlyA, ctxA, vvhA, and tlh genes. Clones of pathogenic Vibrio species were isolated using 3 selective plating media.

Results

In 2017, total seawater isolation rates for Vibrio vulnificus, Vibrio cholerae (non-pathogenic, non-O1, non-O139 serogroups), and Vibrio parahaemolyticus were 15.82%, 13.18%, 65.80%, respectively. However, in 2018 isolation rates for each were 21.81%, 19.40%, and 70.05%, respectively.

Conclusion

The isolation rates of pathogenic Vibrio species positively correlated with the temperature of seawater and atmosphere, but negatively correlated with salinity and turbidity. From 2017 to 2018, the most frequent seawater-isolated Vibrio species were V. parahaemolyticus (68.10 %), V. vulnificus (16.54%), and non-toxigenic V. cholerae (19.58%). Comprehensive monitoring, prevention, and control efforts are needed to protect the public from pathogenic Vibrio species.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Bacterial biocontrol of vibriosis in shrimp: A review
    Esti Harpeni, Alim Isnansetyo, Indah Istiqomah, Murwantoko
    Aquaculture International.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Design of a multi-epitope vaccine (vme-VAC/MST-1) against cholera and vibriosis based on reverse vaccinology and immunoinformatics approaches
    Pedro Henrique Marques, Thais Cristina Vilela Rodrigues, Eduardo Horta Santos, Lucas Bleicher, Flavia Figueira Aburjaile, Flaviano S. Martins, Carlo Jose Freire Oliveira, Vasco Azevedo, Sandeep Tiwari, Siomar Soares
    Journal of Biomolecular Structure and Dynamics.2023; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Nested Spatial and Temporal Modeling of Environmental Conditions Associated With Genetic Markers of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Washington State Pacific Oysters
    Brendan Fries, Benjamin J. K. Davis, Anne E. Corrigan, Angelo DePaola, Frank C. Curriero
    Frontiers in Microbiology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Spatial and temporal effects of fish feed on antibiotic resistance in coastal aquaculture farms
    Shahbaz Raza, Sangki Choi, Minjeong Lee, Jingyeong Shin, Heejong Son, Jinhua Wang, Young Mo Kim
    Environmental Research.2022; 212: 113177.     CrossRef
  • An Assay Combining Droplet Digital PCR With Propidium Monoazide Treatment for the Accurate Detection of Live Cells of Vibrio vulnificus in Plasma Samples
    Ling Hu, Yidong Fu, Shun Zhang, Zhilei Pan, Jiang Xia, Peng Zhu, Jing Guo
    Frontiers in Microbiology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Seasonal variation, virulence gene and antibiotic resistance of Vibrio in a semi-enclosed bay with mariculture (Dongshan Bay, Southern China)
    Qiancheng Gao, Xiaowan Ma, Zhichao Wang, Haisheng Chen, Yu Luo, Bi Wu, Shanni Qi, Miaozhen Lin, Jing Tian, Ying Qiao, Hans-Peter Grossart, Wei Xu, Lixing Huang
    Marine Pollution Bulletin.2022; 184: 114112.     CrossRef
  • Molecular Epidemiology of Antimicrobial Resistance and Virulence Profiles of Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., and Vibrio spp. Isolated from Coastal Seawater for Aquaculture
    Saharuetai Jeamsripong, Varangkana Thaotumpitak, Saran Anuntawirun, Nawaphorn Roongrojmongkhon, Edward R. Atwill, Woranich Hinthong
    Antibiotics.2022; 11(12): 1688.     CrossRef
  • Meteorological and Water Quality Factors Associated with Microbial Diversity in Coastal Water from Intensified Oyster Production Areas of Thailand
    Saharuetai Jeamsripong, Varangkana Thaotumpitak, Saran Anuntawirun, Nawaphorn Roongrojmongkhon, Edward R. Atwill
    Water.2022; 14(23): 3838.     CrossRef
  • Predictive models for the effect of environmental factors on the abundance of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in oyster farms in Taiwan using extreme gradient boosting
    Nodali Ndraha, Hsin-I Hsiao, Yi-Zeng Hsieh, Abani K. Pradhan
    Food Control.2021; 130: 108353.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence, detection of virulence genes and antimicrobial susceptibility of pathogen Vibrio species isolated from different types of seafood samples at “La Nueva Viga” market in Mexico City
    Ana Karen Álvarez-Contreras, Elsa Irma Quiñones-Ramírez, Carlos Vázquez-Salinas
    Antonie van Leeuwenhoek.2021; 114(9): 1417.     CrossRef
An Investigation into Chronic Conditions and Diseases in Minors to Determine the Socioeconomic Status, Medical Use and Expenditure According to Data from the Korea Health Panel, 2015
Jong-Hoon Moon
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2019;10(6):343-350.   Published online December 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2019.10.6.04
  • 5,552 View
  • 144 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study compared the socioeconomic status, medical use and expenditures for infants (1–5 years), juveniles (6–12 years), and adolescents (13–19 years) with a chronic condition or disease to determine factors affecting health spending.

Methods

Data from 3,677 minors (< 20 years old, without disabilities) were extracted from the Korea Health Panel (2015) database.

Results

Minors with chronic conditions or diseases were older (juveniles, and adolescents; p < 0.001), and included a higher proportion of Medicaid recipients (p = 0.004), a higher use of hospital outpatient care (p < 0.001), and higher medical expenditure (p < 0.001) compared to minors without chronic conditions or diseases. Boys were more likely to have a chronic condition or disease than girls (p = 0.036). Adolescents and juveniles were more likely than infants to have a chronic condition or disease (p = 0.001). Medicaid recipients were more likely to have a chronic condition or disease than those who were not Medicaid recipients (p = 0.008). Minors who had been hospital outpatients were more likely to have a chronic condition or disease, compared with minors who had not been an outpatient (p = 0.001). Having a chronic condition or disease, was a factor increasing medical expenditure (p = 0.001). Medical expenditure was higher in infants than in juveniles and adolescents (p = 0.001). Infants had higher rates of medical use when compared with juveniles and adolescents (p = 0.001).

Conclusion

These findings suggest that systematic health care management for minors with chronic conditions or diseases, is needed.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Household income and maternal education in early childhood and activity-limiting chronic health conditions in late childhood: findings from birth cohort studies from six countries
    Nicholas James Spencer, Johnny Ludvigsson, Yueyue You, Kate Francis, Yara Abu Awad, Wolfgang Markham, Tomas Faresjö, Jeremy Goldhaber-Fiebert, Pär Andersson White, Hein Raat, Fiona Mensah, Lise Gauvin, Jennifer J McGrath
    Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.2022; 76(11): 939.     CrossRef
Annual Fluctuation in Chigger Mite Populations and Orientia Tsutsugamushi Infections in Scrub Typhus Endemic Regions of South Korea
Seong Yoon Kim, Byoungchul Gill, Bong Gu Song, Hyuk Chu, Won Il Park, Hee Il Lee, E-hyun Shin, Shin-Hyeong Cho, Jong Yul Roh
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2019;10(6):351-358.   Published online December 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2019.10.6.05
  • 7,553 View
  • 222 Download
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Chigger mites are vectors for scrub typhus. This study evaluated the annual fluctuations in chigger mite populations and Orientia tsutsugamushi infections in South Korea.

Methods

During 2006 and 2007, chigger mites were collected monthly from wild rodents in 4 scrub typhus endemic regions of South Korea. The chigger mites were classified based on morphological characteristics, and analyzed using nested PCR for the detection of Orientia tsutsugamushi.

Results

During the surveillance period, the overall trapping rate for wild rodents was 10.8%. In total, 17,457 chigger mites (representing 5 genera and 15 species) were collected, and the average chigger index (representing the number of chigger mites per rodent), was 31.7. The monthly chigger index was consistently high (> 30) in Spring (March to April) and Autumn (October to November). The mite species included Leptotrombidium pallidum (43.5%), L. orientale (18.9%), L. scutellare (18.1%), L. palpale (10.6%), and L. zetum (3.6%). L. scutellare and L. palpale populations, were relatively higher in Autumn. Monthly O. tsutsugamushi infection rates in wild rodents (average: 4.8%) and chigger mites (average: 0.7%) peaked in Spring and Autumn.

Conclusion

The findings demonstrated a bimodal pattern of the incidence of O. tsutsugamushi infections. Higher infection rates were observed in both wild rodents and chigger mites, in Spring and Autumn. However, this did not reflect the unimodal incidence of scrub typhus in Autumn. Further studies are needed to identify factors, such as human behavior and harvesting in Autumn that may explain this discordance.

Citations

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  • Eco-epidemiology of rodent-associated trombiculid mites and infection with Orientia spp. in Southern Chile
    María Carolina Silva de la Fuente, Caricia Pérez, Constanza Martínez-Valdebenito, Ruth Pérez, Cecilia Vial, Alexandr Stekolnikov, Katia Abarca, Thomas Weitzel, Gerardo Acosta-Jamett, Jessica N. Ricaldi
    PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.2023; 17(1): e0011051.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of Chiggers (Acari: Trombiculidae, Leeuwenhoekiidae) on Two Sibling Mouse Species, Apodemus draco and A. ilex (Rodentia: Muridae), in Southwest China
    Yu Guo, Xian-Guo Guo, Wen-Yu Song, Yan Lv, Peng-Wu Yin, Dao-Chao Jin
    Animals.2023; 13(9): 1480.     CrossRef
  • Epidemiological characteristics of cases with scrub typhus and their correlation with chigger mite occurrence (2019–2021): A focus on case occupation and activity locations
    Se‐Jin Jeong, Jin‐Hwan Jeon, Kyung won Hwang
    Entomological Research.2023; 53(7): 247.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of chigger mites and Orientia tsutsugamushi strains in northern regions of Gangwon-do, Korea
    Soojin Kim, In Yong Lee, Sezim Monoldorova, Jiro Kim, Jang Hoon Seo, Tai-Soon Yong, Bo Young Jeon
    Parasites, Hosts and Diseases.2023; 61(3): 263.     CrossRef
  • Infestation and distribution of chiggers on the Anderson's white‐bellied rats in southwest China
    Yu Guo, Xian‐Guo Guo, Pei‐Ying Peng, Yan Lv, Rong Xiang, Wen‐Yu Song, Xiao‐Bin Huang
    Veterinary Medicine and Science.2023; 9(6): 2920.     CrossRef
  • Seroprevalence and Genotypic Characterization of Orientia tsutsugamushi in Febrile Pediatric Patients Admitted in Tertiary Care Hospital of Chennai, South India
    Rajagopal Murali, Sivasambo Kalpana, Panneerselvam Satheeshkumar, Prabu Dhandapani
    Journal of Pure and Applied Microbiology.2023; 17(4): 2232.     CrossRef
  • Infestation and seasonal fluctuation of chigger mites on the Southeast Asian house rat (Rattus brunneusculus) in southern Yunnan Province, China
    Yan Lv, Xianguo Guo, Daochao Jin, Wenyu Song, Peiying Peng, Hao Lin, Rong Fan, Chengfu Zhao, Zhiwei Zhang, Keyu Mao, Tijun Qian, Wenge Dong, Zhihua Yang
    International Journal for Parasitology: Parasites .2021; 14: 141.     CrossRef
  • Nationwide Incidence of Chigger Mite Populations and Molecular Detection of Orientia tsutsugamushi in the Republic of Korea, 2020
    Min-Goo Seo, Bong-Goo Song, Tae-Kyu Kim, Byung-Eon Noh, Hak Seon Lee, Wook-Gyo Lee, Hee Il Lee
    Microorganisms.2021; 9(8): 1563.     CrossRef
Study of the Relationship Between Self-Efficacy, General Health and Burnout Among Iranian Health Workers
Mohammad Amiri, Hassan Vahedi, Seyed Reza Mirhoseini, Ahmad Reza Eghtesadi, Ahmad Khosravi
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2019;10(6):359-367.   Published online December 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2019.10.6.06
  • 6,623 View
  • 177 Download
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

To evaluate the relationship between self-efficacy, general health and burnout of the staff at Shahroud University of Medical Sciences.

Methods

In 2015, 249 staff at Shahroud University of Medical Sciences (from a total reference population of 520 staff members) were selected through stratified random sampling. To collect the data, Sherer self-efficacy Scale, General Health Questionnaire and Maslach Burnout Inventory were used. The collected data were analyzed through ANOVA, Pearson correlation and Chi-square tests using SPSS 16. The relationship between self-efficacy, general health and burnout (latent factors) were studied using structural equation modeling with Stata 14.

Results

The mean age of participants was 36.97 ± 7.60 years, and the mean number of years work experience was 12.29 ± 7.57. The mean scores of general health, self-efficacy and burnout were 28.24 ± 11.14, 62.30 ± 9.21 and 81.67 ± 22.18, respectively. The results of the study showed a statistically significant relationship between self-efficacy and general health which equals −0.32. A statistically significant relationship also existed between burnout scores and general health scores (beta = 0.78).

Conclusion

The results showed that high self-efficacy improves the general health of employees at the Shahroud University of Medical Sciences and reduces burnout. Special attention should be paid to self-efficacy in the prevention of burnout.

Citations

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  • Healthcare Workers’ General Health and Its Relation with Anxiety, Anger, and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder during COVID-19 Outbreak in Southeast Iran
    Alireza Malakoutikhah, Leila Ahmadi Lari, Pooya Baharloo, Rasmieh Al-Amer, Mohamed Alnaiem, Hossein Khaluei, Mahlagha Dehghan, Lut Tamam
    Mental Illness.2024; 2024: 1.     CrossRef
  • Investigating the Anxiety Caused by COVID-19 and its Relationship with the Self-efficacy and General Health in Iranian Nurses
    Mohammad Amiri, Abolfazl Jamalzadeh, Ahmad Khosravi
    The Open Public Health Journal.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of Burnout Among Health Workers in Iran: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
    Masoudeh Babakhanian, Maryam Qasemi kouhikheili, Fereshteh Araghian Mojarad, Fatemeh Talebian, Tahereh Yaghoubi
    Journal of Nursing and Midwifery Sciences.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Exploring the relationship between psychosocial factors, work engagement, and mental health: a structural equation modeling analysis among faculty in Saudi Arabia
    Nawal Ayyashi, Amira Alshowkan, Emad Shdaifat
    BMC Public Health.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Health-promoting lifestyle and its determining factors among students of public and private universities in Iran
    Mohammad Amiri, Mehdi Raei, Elham Sadeghi, Leila Keikavoosi-Arani, Ahmad Khosravi
    Journal of Education and Health Promotion.2023; 12(1): 239.     CrossRef
  • The relations between mental well-being and burnout in medical staff during the COVID-19 pandemic: A network analysis
    Chen Chen, Fengzhan Li, Chang Liu, Kuiliang Li, Qun Yang, Lei Ren
    Frontiers in Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The role of organizational and supervisor support in young adult workers’ resilience, efficacy and burnout during the COVID-19 pandemic
    Heewon Kim, L. D. Mattson, Dacheng Zhang, Hee Jung Cho
    Journal of Applied Communication Research.2022; 50(6): 691.     CrossRef
  • A psychological health support scheme for medical teams in COVID-19 outbreak and its effectiveness
    Wenhong Cheng, Fang Zhang, Zhen Liu, Hao Zhang, Yifan Lyu, Hao Xu, Yingqi Hua, Jiarong Gu, Zhi Yang, Jun Liu
    General Psychiatry.2020; 33(5): e100288.     CrossRef
  • Impact of the Family Environment on the Emotional State of Medical Staff During the COVID-19 Outbreak: The Mediating Effect of Self-Efficacy
    Na Hu, Ying Li, Su-Shuang He, Lei-Lei Wang, Yan-Yan Wei, Lu Yin, Jing-Xu Chen
    Frontiers in Psychology.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Investigation of Health-Promoting Lifestyle and its Determinants Among Students of Medical Sciences in Iran
    Mohammad Amiri, Ahmad Khosravi, Niloofar Aboozarzadeh, Leila Khojasteh, Zakieh Sadeghi, Mehdi Raei
    The Open Public Health Journal.2020; 13(1): 627.     CrossRef
A Study on the Physical Activities, Mental Health, and Health-Related Quality of Life of Osteoarthritis Patients
Deok-Ju Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2019;10(6):368-375.   Published online December 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2019.10.6.07
  • 6,408 View
  • 242 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The purpose of this study was to investigate the physical activities, mental health, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of osteoarthritis patients.

Methods

This study was conducted using data from the first year of the 7th Korea National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey. There were 8,150 participants included in the survey, and 665 participants had been diagnosed with osteoarthritis. This study analyzed the measurements of physical activities, depression, and HRQOL in participants with osteoarthritis.

Results

The mean age of the participants was 67 ± 9.9 years and 83.1% were female. Participants rarely engaged in work-related physical activity, and engaged in leisure-related physical activities infrequently. Most of the participants (85.9%) did not do regular exercise, but 1/3 of the participants walked for over 10 minutes a day. “Pain/discomfort” had the least impact upon HRQOL, and among the depression subcategories, “difficult to sleep and tiredness” had the most impact. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that an adverse HRQOL score was statistically significantly associated with “location changes/physical activities” (p < 0. 01), “depression” (p < 0.001) and “age” (p < 0.001).

Conclusion

Exercise programs should be in place which are manageable in everyday life for the elderly (> 65 years). Changes in daily routine so that patients become more active, should be supported by the family and community, together with assistance in managing psychological problems such as depression.

Citations

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  • Prevalence and Predictors of Depression in Women with Osteoarthritis: Cross-Sectional Analysis of Nationally Representative Survey Data
    Ananya Ravi, Elisabeth C. DeMarco, Sarah Gebauer, Michael P. Poirier, Leslie J. Hinyard
    Healthcare.2024; 12(5): 502.     CrossRef
  • A scalable 12-week exercise and education programme reduces symptoms and improves function and wellbeing in people with hip and knee osteoarthritis
    Jemma L. Smith, Aidan Q. Innes, Danielle S. Burns, Davina Deniszczyc, James Selfe, Stephen MacConville, Kevin Deighton, Benjamin M. Kelly
    Frontiers in Rehabilitation Sciences.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Special Issue on Biomechanical and Biomedical Factors of Knee Osteoarthritis
    Hanatsu Nagano
    Applied Sciences.2022; 12(22): 11807.     CrossRef
  • Investigation on the association between diabetes distress and productivity among patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus in the primary healthcare institutions
    Yingqi Xu, Gabrielle Yin Yern Tong, Joyce Yu-Chia Lee
    Primary Care Diabetes.2020; 14(5): 538.     CrossRef
Impact of Dengue Surveillance Workers on Community Participation and Satisfaction of Dengue Virus Control Measures in Semarang Municipality, Indonesia: A Policy Breakthrough in Public Health Action
Sayono Sayono, Widoyono Widoyono, Didik Sumanto, Rokhani Rokhani
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2019;10(6):376-384.   Published online December 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2019.10.6.08
  • 6,385 View
  • 98 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The aim of this study was to assess community participation in Dengue virus control measures, and community satisfaction in the Dengue surveillance workers (DSWs) performance in Semarang municipality after 3 years of empowerment.

Methods

A cross-sectional survey involved 1,018 selected participants from 12 groups of social roles in 141 villages in Semarang municipality, Indonesia. A direct interview was performed using a structured questionnaire to evaluate the acceptance, and satisfaction of the community towards the DSWs. The data were analyzed descriptively.

Results

The majority of the members of the community considered that the DSWs play an important role in reducing Dengue cases, and vectors of the Dengue virus, as well as increasing the community participation in Dengue control measures. The survey showed that DSWs performance, attitudes, and abilities regarding their main tasks were perceived to be good.

Conclusion

Overall, people in Semarang municipality were satisfied with the performance of the DSWs, and considered them important enough to be maintained and strengthened in the future so that Dengue could be controlled. This new policy needs to be disseminated to other regions that may encounter the problems associated with Dengue virus.

Citations

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  • Community engagement to control dengue vector in two municipalities of Aragua State, Venezuela
    María Martínez, Victor Mijares, Nancy Moreno, Luis Pérez-Ybarra, Flor de María Herrera
    Journal of Current Health Sciences.2023; 3(1): 21.     CrossRef
  • Dengue hemorrhagic fever: a growing global menace
    Shakeela Parveen, Zainab Riaz, Saba Saeed, Urwah Ishaque, Mehwish Sultana, Zunaira Faiz, Zainab Shafqat, Saman Shabbir, Sana Ashraf, Amna Marium
    Journal of Water and Health.2023; 21(11): 1632.     CrossRef
  • World Dengue Day: A call for action
    Nattachai Srisawat, Usa Thisyakorn, Zulkifli Ismail, Kamran Rafiq, Duane J. Gubler, Hannah E. Clapham
    PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.2022; 16(8): e0010586.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of Toxicity in Four Extract Types of Tuba Root against Dengue Vector, Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) Larvae
    S. Sayono, R. Anwar, D. Sumanto
    Pakistan Journal of Biological Sciences.2020; 23(12): 1530.     CrossRef
Mediation Effects of Basic Psychological Needs Between Autonomy Support from Healthcare Providers and Self-Management Among Cancer Survivors
Eun-Jung Bae, Yun-Hee Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2019;10(6):385-393.   Published online December 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2019.10.6.09
  • 5,882 View
  • 184 Download
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study examined the mediating effects of basic psychological needs between patient autonomy support from healthcare providers, and self-management among cancer survivors.

Methods

This study collected data from 148 cancer patients who had visited D hospitals in B city, Korea. A structured questionnaire was distributed to determine patient characteristics, healthcare provider autonomy support, basic psychological needs, and self-management. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Pearson’s correlation coefficient, and regression analysis that implemented Baron and Kenny’s method for mediation were used for analyses.

Results

Self-management was significantly correlated with the level of healthcare provider autonomy support (r = 0.38, p < 0.001), autonomy (r = 0.40, p < 0.001), competence (r = 0.25, p = 0.002), and relatedness (r = 0.32, p < 0.001). Furthermore, autonomy (β = 0.30, p < 0.001) and relatedness (β = 0.22, p = 0.008) had partial mediating effects on the relationship between healthcare provider autonomy support and self-management (Z = 3.13, p = 0.002 and Z = 2.29, p = 0.022, respectively).

Conclusion

Autonomy and relatedness mediated the impact of healthcare provider autonomy support for self-management among cancer survivors. This suggests that strategies for enhancing autonomy and relatedness should be considered when developing self-management interventions for cancer survivor patients.

Citations

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  • Validation of the Korean Version of the Health Care Climate Questionnaire among Cancer Survivors
    Hyun-E Yeom, Jungmin Lee, Young-Joo Kim
    Healthcare.2024; 12(3): 323.     CrossRef
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Estimation of the Size of Dengue and Zika Infection Among Korean Travelers to Southeast Asia and Latin America, 2016–2017
Chaeshin Chu, Een Suk Shin
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2019;10(6):394-398.   Published online December 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2019.10.6.10
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

To estimate the number and risk of imported infections resulting from people visiting Asian and Latin American countries.

Methods

The dataset of visitors to 5 Asian countries with dengue were analyzed for 2016 and 2017, and in the Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam, imported cases of zika virus infection were also reported. For zika virus, a single imported case was reported from Brazil in 2016, and 2 imported cases reported from the Maldives in 2017. To understand the transmissibility in 5 Southeast Asian countries, the estimate of the force of infection, i.e., the hazard of infection per year and the average duration of travel has been extracted. Outbound travel numbers were retrieved from the World Tourism Organization, including business travelers.

Results

The incidence of imported dengue in 2016 was estimated at 7.46, 15.00, 2.14, 4.73 and 2.40 per 100,000 travelers visiting Philippines, Indonesia, Thailand, Malaysia and Vietnam, respectively. Similarly, 2.55, 1.65, 1.53, 1.86 and 1.70 per 100,000 travelers in 2017, respectively. It was estimated that there were 60.1 infections (range: from 16.8 to 150.7 infections) with zika virus in Brazil, 2016, and 345.6 infections (range: from 85.4 to 425.5 infections) with zika virus in the Maldives, 2017.

Conclusion

This study emphasizes that dengue and zika virus infections are mild in their nature, and a substantial number of infections may go undetected. An appropriate risk assessment of zika virus infection must use the estimated total size of infections.


PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives