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Young-Joon Park 11 Articles
Evaluation of COVID-19 vaccine effectiveness in different high-risk facility types during a period of Delta variant dominance in the Republic of Korea: a cross-sectional study
Min Jei Lee, Myung-Jae Hwang, Dong Seob Kim, Seon Kyeong Park, Jihyun Choi, Ji Joo Lee, Jong Mu Kim, Young-Man Kim, Young-Joon Park, Jin Gwack, Sang-Eun Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2023;14(5):418-426.   Published online October 19, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2023.0188
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Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
We evaluated the effectiveness of coronavirus disease 2019 vaccination in high-risk facilities in the Republic of Korea during the period when the highly transmissible Delta variant was prevalent. Additionally, we aimed to explore any disparities in vaccine effectiveness (VE) across various types of institutions, specifically distinguishing between non-medical and medical establishments. Methods: We examined 8 outbreak clusters covering 243 cases and 895 contacts from 8 high-risk facilities divided into 2 groups: group A (4 non-medical institutions) and group B (4 medical institutions). These clusters were observed from July 27, 2021 to October 16, 2021 for the attack rate (AR) and VE with respect to disease severity. A generalized linear model with a binomial distribution was used to determine the odds ratio (OR) for disease severity and death. Results: AR was notably lower in group B (medical institutions). Furthermore, VE analysis revealed that group A exhibited higher effectivity for disease severity and death than group B. The OR for disease severity was 0.24 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.03–2.16) for group A and 0.27 (95% CI, 0.12–0.64) for group B, with the OR for death at 0.12 (95% CI, 0.01–1.32) in group A and 0.34 (95% CI, 0.14–0.87) in group B. Conclusion: Although VE may vary across institutions, our findings underscore the importance of implementing vaccinations in high-risk facilities. Customized vaccination programs, tailored response plans, and competent management personnel are essential for effectively addressing and mitigating public health challenges.
Risk factors for transmission in a COVID-19 cluster infection in a high school in the Republic of Korea
Jin-Hwan Jeon, Su Jin Kang, Se-Jin Jeong, Hyeon-Cheol Jang, Young-Joon Park, Sang-Eun Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2023;14(4):252-262.   Published online July 27, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2023.0125
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  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study aimed to examine the scale, characteristics, risk factors, and modes of transmission in a coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak at a high school in Seoul, Republic of Korea.
Methods
An epidemiological survey was conducted of 1,118 confirmed cases and close contacts from a COVID-19 outbreak at an educational facility starting on May 31, 2021. In-depth interviews, online questionnaires, flow evaluations, and CCTV analyses were used to devise infection prevention measures. Behavioral and spatial risk factors were identified, and statistical significance was tested.
Results
Among 3rd-year students, there were 33 confirmed COVID-19 cases (9.6%). Students who used a study room in the annex building showed a statistically significant 4.3-fold elevation in their relative risk for infection compared to those who did not use the study room. Moreover, CCTV facial recognition analysis confirmed that 17.8% of 3rd-year students did not wear masks and had the lowest percentage of mask-wearers by grade. The air epidemiological survey conducted in the study room in the annex, which met the 3 criteria for a closed space, confirmed that there was only 10% natural ventilation due to the poor ventilation system.
Conclusion
To prevent and manage the spread of COVID-19 in educational facilities, advance measures that consider the size, operation, and resources of each school are crucial. In addition, various survey methodologies should be used in future studies to quickly analyze a wider range of data that can inform an evidence-based quarantine response.

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  • Detection of a cluster of Omicron's BA.4 sublineage in Northern Senegal and identification of the first XAS recombinant variant in Senegal
    Martin Faye, Modeste Name Faye, Babacar Ndiaye, Moussa Moïse Diagne, Safietou Sankhe, Ndeye Marième Top, Amadou Diallo, Cheikh Loucoubar, Ndongo Dia, Amadou Alpha Sall, Ousmane Faye
    Virus Research.2024; 339: 199259.     CrossRef
Results of contact tracing for SARS-CoV-2 Omicron sub-lineages (BA.4, BA.5, BA.2.75) and the household secondary attack risk
Mi Yu, Sang-Eun Lee, Hye Young Lee, Hye-jin Kim, Yeong-Jun Song, Jian Jeong, Ae Kyung Park, Il-Hwan Kim, Eun-jin Kim, Young-Joon Park
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2023;14(3):173-179.   Published online June 22, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2022.0285
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Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study aimed to assess the contact tracing outcomes of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) Omicron sub-lineages BA.4, BA.5, and BA.2.75 within Republic of Korea, and to generate foundational data for responding to future novel variants.
Methods
We conducted investigations and contact tracing for 79 confirmed BA.4 cases, 396 confirmed BA.5 cases, and 152 confirmed BA.2.75 cases. These cases were identified through random sampling of both domestically confirmed and imported cases, with the goal of evaluating the pattern of occurrence and transmissibility.
Results
We detected 79 instances of Omicron sub-lineage BA.4 across a span of 46 days, 396 instances of Omicron sub-lineage BA.5 in 46 days, and 152 instances of Omicron sub-lineage BA.2.75 over 62 days. One patient with severe illness was confirmed among the BA.5 cases; however, there were no reports of severe illness in the confirmed BA.4 and BA.2.75 cases. The secondary attack risk among household contacts were 19.6% for BA.4, 27.8% for BA.5, and 24.3% for BA.2.75. No statistically significant difference was found between the Omicron sub-lineages.
Conclusion
BA.2.75 did not demonstrate a higher tendency for transmissibility, disease severity, or secondary attack risk within households when compared to BA.4 and BA.5. We will continue to monitor major SARS-CoV-2 variants, and we plan to enhance the disease control and response systems.
Analysis of pregnant women with critically severe COVID-19 in Republic of Korea from February 2020 and December 2021
Ji Joo Lee, Sang-Eun Lee, Yeonjung Kim, Young-Joon Park
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2023;14(2):129-137.   Published online April 5, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2023.0025
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Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study aimed to describe the characteristics and risk factors for severe disease in pregnant women infected with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) from the early days of the COVID-19 epidemic in Korea to the predominant period of the Delta variant.
Methods
A retrospective cohort study was conducted among pregnant women diagnosed with COVID-19 between February 2020 and December 2021. Logistic regression analysis was performed to compare severe and mild cases after adjusting for pregnant women’s age, nationality, infection route, outbreak area, infection period, symptoms, underlying disease, smoking status, trimester, and COVID-19 vaccination status.
Results
In total, 2,233 pregnant women were diagnosed with COVID-19 by December 2021. Among these, 96.7% had mild symptoms, 3.3% had severe symptoms, and 0.04% died. The risk factors for severe disease in pregnant women with confirmed COVID-19 were being in the age group of 35 to 45 years, having hyperlipidemia, being in the second or third trimester of pregnancy at the time of COVID-19 diagnosis, being infected during the Delta-predominant period, and having a fever (≥38 °C) at diagnosis. Furthermore, 47.1% of patients in the mild group and 84.9% of patients in the severe group had 3 or more risk factors.
Conclusion
Pregnant women with COVID-19 mainly experienced mild symptoms, but those with risk factors were at a higher risk of developing severe symptoms. Therefore, treatment and follow-up management should be thoroughly implemented.
Presumed population immunity to SARS-CoV-2 in South Korea, April 2022
Eun Jung Jang, Young June Choe, Seung Ah Choe, Yoo-Yeon Kim, Ryu Kyung Kim, Jia Kim, Do Sang Lim, Ju Hee Lee, Seonju Yi, Sangwon Lee, Young-Joon Park
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2022;13(5):377-381.   Published online October 14, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2022.0209
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  • 2 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
We estimated the overall and age-specific percentages of the Korean population with presumed immunity against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARSCoV-2) as of April 2022 using the national registry.
Methods
We used the national coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection and vaccination registry from South Korea, as described to define individuals with a previous history of COVID-19 infection, vaccination, or both, as persons with presumed immunity.
Results
Of a total of 53,304,627 observed persons, 24.4% had vaccination and infection, 58.1% had vaccination and no infection, 7.6% had infection and no vaccination, and 9.9% had no immunity. The SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant emerged at a time when the presumed population immunity ranged from 80% to 85%; however, nearly half of the children were presumed to have no immunity.
Conclusion
We report a gap in population immunity, with lower presumed protection in children than in adults. The approach presented in this work can provide valuable informed tools to assist vaccine policy-making at a national level.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Realistic Estimation of COVID-19 Infection by Seroprevalence Surveillance of SARS-CoV-2 Antibodies: An Experience From Korea Metropolitan Area From January to May 2022
    In Hwa Jeong, Jong-Hun Kim, Min-Jung Kwon, Jayoung Kim, Hee Jin Huh, Byoungguk Kim, Junewoo Lee, Jeong-hyun Nam, Eun-Suk Kang
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Predicting adherence to COVID-19 preventive measures among South Korean adults aged 40 to 69 Years using the expanded health empowerment model
    Su-Jung Nam, Tae-Young Pak
    SSM - Population Health.2023; 22: 101411.     CrossRef
  • Acute COVID-19 in unvaccinated children without a history of previous infection during the delta and omicron periods
    Jee Min Kim, Ji Yoon Han, Seung Beom Han
    Postgraduate Medicine.2023; 135(7): 727.     CrossRef
Characteristics of COVID-19 outbreaks and risk factors for transmission at an army training center in South Korea from June to August 2021
U Jin Cho, Seongjin Wang, Seonju Yi, Yeon Hwa Choi, Eun-Young Kim, Jin A Kim, Sanghwan Bae, Jungyeon Yu, Jangkyu Choi, Young-Joon Park
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2022;13(4):263-272.   Published online July 27, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2022.0149
  • 2,856 View
  • 115 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
It is crucial to establish the characteristics of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreaks at army training centers to develop preventive measures. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the COVID-19 transmission patterns and risk factors in a sequence of outbreaks at an army training center from June to August 2021.
Methods
This study included 1,324 trainees at an army training center where outbreaks occurred from June to August 2021. The outbreak was qualitatively analyzed according to the period, attack rate, demographic characteristics, vaccination history, and living areas. An aerodynamic experiment was performed to evaluate aerosol transmission in living areas.
Results
Three outbreaks occurred at the army training center from June to August 2021. The first, second, and third outbreaks lasted for 32, 17, and 24 days, and the attack rates were 12.8%, 18.1%, and 8.9%, respectively. Confirmed cases were distributed in all age groups. Recruits and the unvaccinated were at higher risk for COVID-19. The aerodynamic experiment verified the possibility of aerosol transmission within the same living area.
Conclusion
COVID-19 transmission at army training centers should be minimized through quarantine and post-admission testing during the latency period as part of integrated measures that include facility ventilation, vaccination, indoor mask-wearing, and social distancing.

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  • COVID-19 outbreak in a religious village community in Republic of Korea and risk factors for transmission
    Jiae Shim, Eunju Lee, Eunyoung Kim, Yeonhwa Choi, Giseok Kang, Bryan Inho Kim
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2023; 14(2): 110.     CrossRef
  • Epidemiological Characteristics of a COVID-19 Outbreak in a Psychiatric Hospital in Chung-buk
    Se-Hyuk Jang, Young-Joon Park, Ji-Joo Lee, Woo-Jin Jung
    Healthcare.2023; 11(16): 2332.     CrossRef
Genomic Surveillance of SARS-CoV-2: Distribution of Clades in the Republic of Korea in 2020
Ae Kyung Park, Il-Hwan Kim, Junyoung Kim, Jeong-Min Kim, Heui Man Kim, Chae young Lee, Myung-Guk Han, Gi-Eun Rhie, Donghyok Kwon, Jeong-Gu Nam, Young-Joon Park, Jin Gwack, Nam-Joo Lee, SangHee Woo, Jin Sun No, Jaehee Lee, Jeemin Ha, JeeEun Rhee, Cheon-Kwon Yoo, Eun-Jin Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(1):37-43.   Published online February 23, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.12.1.06
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  • 221 Download
  • 20 Web of Science
  • 22 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF

Since a novel beta-coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) was first reported in December 2019, there has been a rapid global spread of the virus. Genomic surveillance was conducted on samples isolated from infected individuals to monitor the spread of genetic variants of SARS-CoV-2 in Korea. The Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency performed whole genome sequencing of SARS-CoV-2 in Korea for 1 year (January 2020 to January 2021). A total of 2,488 SARS-CoV-2 cases were sequenced (including 648 cases from abroad). Initially, the prevalent clades of SARS-CoV-2 were the S and V clades, however, by March 2020, GH clade was the most dominant. Only international travelers were identified as having G or GR clades, and since the first variant 501Y.V1 was identified (from a traveler from the United Kingdom on December 22nd, 2020), a total of 27 variants of 501Y.V1, 501Y.V2, and 484K.V2 have been classified (as of January 25th, 2021). The results in this study indicated that quarantining of travelers entering Korea successfully prevented dissemination of the SARS-CoV-2 variants in Korea.

Citations

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  • Increased viral load in patients infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 Omicron variant in the Republic of Korea
    Jeong-Min Kim, Dongju Kim, Nam-Joo Lee, Sang Hee Woo, Jaehee Lee, Hyeokjin Lee, Ae Kyung Park, Jeong-Ah Kim, Chae Young Lee, Il-Hwan Kim, Cheon Kwon Yoo, Eun-Jin Kim
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2023; 14(4): 272.     CrossRef
  • Rapid Emergence of the Omicron Variant of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 in Korea
    Ae Kyung Park, Il-Hwan Kim, Chae Young Lee, Jeong-Ah Kim, Hyeokjin Lee, Heui Man Kim, Nam-Joo Lee, SangHee Woo, Jaehee Lee, JeeEun Rhee, Cheon-Kwon Yoo, Eun-Jin Kim
    Annals of Laboratory Medicine.2023; 43(2): 211.     CrossRef
  • A Seroprevalence Study on Residents in a Senior Care Facility with Breakthrough SARS-CoV-2 Omicron Infection
    Heui Man Kim, Eun Ju Lee, Sang Won O, Yong Jun Choi, Hyeokjin Lee, Sae Jin Oh, Jeong-Min Kim, Ae Kyung Park, Jeong-Ah Kim, Chae young Lee, Jong Mu Kim, Hanul Park, Young Joon Park, Jeong-Hee Yu, Eun-Young Kim, Hwa-Pyeong Ko, Eun-Jin Kim
    Viral Immunology.2023; 36(3): 203.     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 Cases and Deaths among Healthcare Personnel with the Progression of the Pandemic in Korea from March 2020 to February 2022
    Yeonju Kim, Sung-Chan Yang, Jinhwa Jang, Shin Young Park, Seong Sun Kim, Chansoo Kim, Donghyok Kwon, Sang-Won Lee
    Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease.2023; 8(6): 308.     CrossRef
  • The COVID-19 pandemic and healthcare utilization in Iran: evidence from an interrupted time series analysis
    Monireh Mahmoodpour-Azari, Satar Rezaei, Nasim Badiee, Mohammad Hajizadeh, Ali Mohammadi, Ali Kazemi-Karyani, Shahin Soltani, Mehdi Khezeli
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2023; 14(3): 180.     CrossRef
  • Online Phylogenetics with matOptimize Produces Equivalent Trees and is Dramatically More Efficient for Large SARS-CoV-2 Phylogenies than de novo and Maximum-Likelihood Implementations
    Alexander M Kramer, Bryan Thornlow, Cheng Ye, Nicola De Maio, Jakob McBroome, Angie S Hinrichs, Robert Lanfear, Yatish Turakhia, Russell Corbett-Detig, Olivier Gascuel
    Systematic Biology.2023; 72(5): 1039.     CrossRef
  • Genomic epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2 variants in South Korea between January 2020 and February 2023
    Il-Hwan Kim, Jin Sun No, Jeong-Ah Kim, Ae Kyung Park, HyeokJin Lee, Jeong-Min Kim, Nam-Joo Lee, Chi-Kyeong Kim, Chae Young Lee, SangHee Woo, Jaehee Lee, JeeEun Rhee, Eun-Jin Kim
    Virology.2023; 587: 109869.     CrossRef
  • Genomic evidence of SARS‐CoV‐2 reinfection in the Republic of Korea
    Ae Kyung Park, Jee Eun Rhee, Il‐Hwan Kim, Heui Man Kim, Hyeokjin Lee, Jeong‐Ah Kim, Chae Young Lee, Nam‐Joo Lee, SangHee Woo, Jaehee Lee, Jin Sun No, Gi‐Eun Rhie, Seong Jin Wang, Sang‐Eun Lee, Young Joon Park, Gemma Park, Jung Yeon Kim, Jin Gwack, Cheon‐K
    Journal of Medical Virology.2022; 94(4): 1717.     CrossRef
  • SARS-CoV-2 B.1.619 and B.1.620 Lineages, South Korea, 2021
    Ae Kyung Park, Il-Hwan Kim, Heui Man Kim, Hyeokjin Lee, Nam-Joo Lee, Jeong-Ah Kim, SangHee Woo, Chae young Lee, Jaehee Lee, Sae Jin Oh, JeeEun Rhee, Cheon-Kwon Yoo, Eun-Jin Kim
    Emerging Infectious Diseases.2022; 28(2): 415.     CrossRef
  • Humoral and Cellular Responses to COVID-19 Vaccines in SARS-CoV-2 Infection-Naïve and -Recovered Korean Individuals
    Ji-Young Hwang, Yunhwa Kim, Kyung-Min Lee, Eun-Jeong Jang, Chang-Hoon Woo, Chang-Ui Hong, Seok-Tae Choi, Sivilay Xayaheuang, Jong-Geol Jang, June-Hong Ahn, Hosun Park
    Vaccines.2022; 10(2): 332.     CrossRef
  • Increase in Viral Load in Patients With SARS-CoV-2 Delta Variant Infection in the Republic of Korea
    Jeong-Min Kim, Jee Eun Rhee, Myeongsu Yoo, Heui Man Kim, Nam-Joo Lee, Sang Hee Woo, Hye-Jun Jo, Donghyok Kwon, Sangwon Lee, Cheon Kwon Yoo, Eun-Jin Kim
    Frontiers in Microbiology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Molecular Dynamics Studies on the Structural Stability Prediction of SARS-CoV-2 Variants Including Multiple Mutants
    Kwang-Eun Choi, Jeong-Min Kim, Jee Eun Rhee, Ae Kyung Park, Eun-Jin Kim, Cheon Kwon Yoo, Nam Sook Kang
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2022; 23(9): 4956.     CrossRef
  • SARS-CoV-2 shedding dynamics and transmission in immunosuppressed patients
    Jee-Soo Lee, Ki Wook Yun, Hyeonju Jeong, Boram Kim, Man Jin Kim, Jae Hyeon Park, Ho Seob Shin, Hyeon Sae Oh, Hobin Sung, Myung Gi Song, Sung Im Cho, So Yeon Kim, Chang Kyung Kang, Pyoeng Gyun Choe, Wan Beom Park, Nam Joong Kim, Myoung-Don Oh, Eun Hwa Choi
    Virulence.2022; 13(1): 1242.     CrossRef
  • Immunological and Pathological Peculiarity of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 Beta Variant
    Sunhee Lee, Gun Young Yoon, Su Jin Lee, Young-Chan Kwon, Hyun Woo Moon, Yu-Jin Kim, Haesoo Kim, Wooseong Lee, Gi Uk Jeong, Chonsaeng Kim, Kyun-Do Kim, Seong-Jun Kim, Dae-Gyun Ahn, Miguel Angel Martinez
    Microbiology Spectrum.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Clinical scoring system to predict viable viral shedding in patients with COVID-19
    Sung Woon Kang, Heedo Park, Ji Yeun Kim, Sunghee Park, So Yun Lim, Sohyun Lee, Joon-Yong Bae, Jeonghun Kim, Seongman Bae, Jiwon Jung, Min Jae Kim, Yong Pil Chong, Sang-Oh Lee, Sang-Ho Choi, Yang Soo Kim, Sung-Cheol Yun, Man-Seong Park, Sung-Han Kim
    Journal of Clinical Virology.2022; 157: 105319.     CrossRef
  • Model-informed COVID-19 exit strategy with projections of SARS-CoV-2 infections generated by variants in the Republic of Korea
    Sung-mok Jung, Kyungmin Huh, Munkhzul Radnaabaatar, Jaehun Jung
    BMC Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Comparative analysis of mutational hotspots in the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 isolates from different geographic origins
    Sanghoo Lee, Mi-Kyeong Lee, Hyeongkyun Na, Jinwoo Ahn, Gayeon Hong, Youngkee Lee, Jimyeong Park, Yejin Kim, Yun-Tae Kim, Chang-Ki Kim, Hwan-Sub Lim, Kyoung-Ryul Lee
    Gene Reports.2021; 23: 101100.     CrossRef
  • Review of Current COVID-19 Diagnostics and Opportunities for Further Development
    Yan Mardian, Herman Kosasih, Muhammad Karyana, Aaron Neal, Chuen-Yen Lau
    Frontiers in Medicine.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Locally harvested Covid-19 convalescent plasma could probably help combat the geographically determined SARS-CoV-2 viral variants
    Manish Raturi, Anuradha Kusum, Mansi Kala, Garima Mittal, Anita Sharma, Naveen Bansal
    Transfusion Clinique et Biologique.2021; 28(3): 300.     CrossRef
  • Molecular Dynamics Studies on the Structural Characteristics for the Stability Prediction of SARS-CoV-2
    Kwang-Eun Choi, Jeong-Min Kim, JeeEun Rhee, Ae Kyung Park, Eun-Jin Kim, Nam Sook Kang
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2021; 22(16): 8714.     CrossRef
  • Management following the first confirmed case of SARS-CoV-2 in a domestic cat associated with a massive outbreak in South Korea
    Taewon Han, Boyeong Ryu, Suyeon Lee, Yugyeong Song, Yoongje Jeong, Ilhwan Kim, Jeongmin Kim, Eunjin Kim, Wonjun Lee, Hyunju Lee, Haekyoung Hwang
    One Health.2021; 13: 100328.     CrossRef
  • Genomic epidemiology reveals the reduction of the introduction and spread of SARS-CoV-2 after implementing control strategies in Republic of Korea, 2020
    Jung-Hoon Kwon, Jeong-Min Kim, Dong-hun Lee, Ae Kyung Park, Il-Hwan Kim, Da-Won Kim, Ji-Yun Kim, Noori Lim, Kyeong-Yeon Cho, Heui Man Kim, Nam-Joo Lee, SangHee Woo, Chae Young Lee, Jin Sun No, Junyoung Kim, JeeEun Rhee, Myung-Guk Han, Gi-Eun Rhie, Cheon K
    Virus Evolution.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Pandemic Influenza A(H1N1) 2009 Vaccine Based on an Outbreak Investigation During the 2010–2011 Season in Korean Military Camps
Kyo-Hyun Kim, Yoon Gu Choi, Hyun-Bae Yoon, Jung-Woo Lee, Hyun-Wook Kim, Chaeshin Chu, Young-Joon Park
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2013;4(4):209-214.   Published online August 31, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.07.002
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
In December 2010, there was an outbreak of acute febrile respiratory disease in many Korean military camps that were not geographically related. A laboratory analysis confirmed a number of these cases to be infected by the pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 (H1N1pdm09) virus. Because mass vaccination against H1N1pdm09 was implemented at the infected military camps eleven months ago, the outbreak areas in which both vaccinated and nonvaccinated individuals were well mixed, gave us an opportunity to evaluate the effectiveness of H1N1pdm09 vaccine through a retrospective cohort study design.
Methods
A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to the three military camps in which the outbreak occurred for case detection, determination of vaccination status, and characterization of other risk factors. The overall response rate was 86.8% (395/455). Case was defined as fever (≥38 °C) with cough or sore throat, influenza-like illness (ILI), and vaccination status verified by vaccination registry. Crude vaccine effectiveness (VE) was calculated as “1 − attack rate in vaccinated individuals/attack rate in nonvaccinated individuals”, and adjusted VE was calculated as “1 – odds ratio” using logistic regression adjusted for potential confounding factor. A number of ILI definitions were used to test the robustness of the result.
Results
The attack rate of ILI was 12.8% in register-verified vaccinated individuals and 24.0% in nonvaccinated individuals. The crude VE was thus calculated to be 46.8% [95% confidence interval (CI): 14.5–66.9]. The adjusted VE rate was 46.8% (95% CI: –9.4 to 74.1). Various combinations of ILI symptoms also showed similar VE rates.
Conclusion
We evaluated the effectiveness of H1N1pdm09 vaccine in the 2010–2011 season in an outbreak setting. Although the result was not sensitive to any analytical method used and ILI case definition, the magnitude of effectiveness was lower than estimated in the 2009–2010 season.

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  • Assessment of Intensive Vaccination and Antiviral Treatment in 2009 Influenza Pandemic in Korea
    Chaeshin Chu, Sunmi Lee
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2015; 6(1): 47.     CrossRef
  • Was the Mass Vaccination Effective During the Influenza Pandemic 2009–2010 in Korea?
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2013; 4(4): 177.     CrossRef
Revision of the National Action Plan in Response to Poliovirus Importation in Korea
Young-Joon Park, Joon-Woo Kim, Yoon Hyung Kwon, Geun-Ryang Bae, Duk-Hyoung Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2013;4(2):117-121.   Published online April 30, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.03.008
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AbstractAbstract PDF
The polio outbreak in China in 2011 makes it necessary to revise the 2010 polio National Action Plan (NAP) in Korea. The revised plan was provided after evaluation of the 2010 NAP, literature reviews, and expert advice. It was discussed and confirmed by the Polio National Certificate Committee (NCC).The revised NAP (2012 NAP) has structured the action to take by patient phase and the role of each institution. It also provides the specified classification and management actions on the contacts. It includes a new recommendation of onetime additional immunization for the contacts regardless of the immunization history. The 2012 NAP could provide an effective countermeasure if there are imported poliomyelitis patients in Korea.

Citations

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  • Use of inactivated poliovirus vaccine for poliovirus outbreak response
    Ananda S Bandyopadhyay, Rocio Lopez Cavestany, Isobel M Blake, Grace Macklin, Laura Cooper, Nicholas Grassly, Ana Leticia Melquiades dos Santos Nery, Ondrej Mach
    The Lancet Infectious Diseases.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Enterovirus Surveillance (EVSurv) in Germany
    Kathrin Keeren, Sindy Böttcher, Sabine Diedrich
    Microorganisms.2021; 9(10): 2005.     CrossRef
  • Fires in the Neighborhood
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2013; 4(2): 67.     CrossRef
Factors Related to Completed Status and Seropositivity of Hepatitis A Immunization Among Children Aged 1–3 Years and 6–8 Years in South Korea
Jee-Young Hong, Mo Ran Ki, Hye-Jung Hwang, Delacroix Sinny, Young-Joon Park, Geun-Ryang Bae, Moo-Sik Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2013;4(2):93-98.   Published online April 30, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.02.004
  • 3,402 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
This study was designed to identify factors associated with hepatitis A immunization status and seropositivity in Korean children. In-person interviews, reviewing their vaccination cards and testing hepatitis A antibody were conducted with 389 children aged 1–3 years and 544 children aged 6–8 years. In all age groups, earlier birth order was the only significant factor in children receiving either single or both doses of the vaccination. And completion of the second dose of vaccination was a prerequisite for increased seropositivity. Additionally, household income had a positive impact on seropositivity only in children aged 6–8 years. Our findings suggest that presence of an economic barrier is the underlying cause of the decreased hepatitis A vaccination services in Korea. Therefore, hepatitis A vaccine should be included in the essential National Immunization Program.

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Risk factors for SARS-CoV-2 transmission during a movie theater outbreak in Incheon in the Republic of Korea, November 2021: a retrospective study
Hye Young Lee, Young-Joon Park, Sang-Eun Lee, Han-Na Yoo, Il-Hwan Kim, Jin Sun No, Eun-Jin Kim, Jungyeon Yu, Sanghwan Bae, Mi Yu
Received September 20, 2023  Accepted November 26, 2023  Published online January 31, 2024  
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2023.0269    [Epub ahead of print]
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
We examined factors contributing to the transmission of an acute respiratory virus within multi-use facilities, focusing on an outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in a movie theater in the Republic of Korea.
Methods
This retrospective cohort study involved a descriptive analysis of 48 confirmed cases. Logistic regression was applied to a cohort of 80 theater attendees to identify risk factors for infection. The infection source and transmission route were determined through gene sequencing data analysis.
Results
Of the 48 confirmed cases, 35 were theater attendees (72.9%), 10 were family members of attendees (20.8%), 2 were friends (4.2%), and 1 was an employee (2.1%). Among the 80 individuals who attended the 3rd to 5th screenings of the day, 35 became infected, representing a 45.0% attack rate. Specifically, 28 of the 33 third-screening attendees developed confirmed SARS-CoV-2, constituting an 84.8% attack rate. Furthermore, 11 of the 12 cases epidemiologically linked to the theater outbreak were clustered monophyletically within the AY.69 lineage. At the time of the screening, 35 individuals (72.9%) had received 2 vaccine doses. However, vaccination status did not significantly influence infection risk. Multivariate analysis revealed that close contacts had a 15.9-fold higher risk of infection (95% confidence interval, 4.37–78.39) than casual contacts.
Conclusion
SARS-CoV-2 transmission occurred within the theater, and extended into the community, via a moviegoer who attended the 3rd screening during the viral incubation period after contracting the virus from a family member. This study emphasizes the importance of adequate ventilation in theaters.

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives