Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Author index

Page Path
HOME > Articles and issues > Author index
Search
Young June Choe 5 Articles
Presumed population immunity to SARS-CoV-2 in South Korea, April 2022
Eun Jung Jang, Young June Choe, Seung Ah Choe, Yoo-Yeon Kim, Ryu Kyung Kim, Jia Kim, Do Sang Lim, Ju Hee Lee, Seonju Yi, Sangwon Lee, Young-Joon Park
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2022;13(5):377-381.   Published online October 14, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2022.0209
  • 551 View
  • 31 Download
Graphical AbstractGraphical Abstract AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
We estimated the overall and age-specific percentages of the Korean population with presumed immunity against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARSCoV-2) as of April 2022 using the national registry.
Methods
We used the national coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection and vaccination registry from South Korea, as described to define individuals with a previous history of COVID-19 infection, vaccination, or both, as persons with presumed immunity.
Results
Of a total of 53,304,627 observed persons, 24.4% had vaccination and infection, 58.1% had vaccination and no infection, 7.6% had infection and no vaccination, and 9.9% had no immunity. The SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant emerged at a time when the presumed population immunity ranged from 80% to 85%; however, nearly half of the children were presumed to have no immunity.
Conclusion
We report a gap in population immunity, with lower presumed protection in children than in adults. The approach presented in this work can provide valuable informed tools to assist vaccine policy-making at a national level.
A Public-Private Partnership Model to Build a Triage System in Response to a COVID-19 Outbreak in Hanam City, South Korea
Seong Su Ku, Young June Choe
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2020;11(5):339-342.   Published online October 22, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2020.11.5.11
  • 4,303 View
  • 83 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

A substantial, immediate healthcare burden for screening of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is created when large-scale outbreaks occur. There have been a series of measures to strengthen the screening process through robust public-private partnerships between Hanam City Public Health Center (PHC), the local medical association, and central/provincial government. A partnership between PHC and the local physician’s group in Hanam City established the Respiratory Clinic. The PHC provided the infrastructure for the Respiratory Clinic including medical facilities, supplies (i.e. personal protective equipment), and administrative support. A total of 11 registered physicians from the local physicians group agreed to participate in clinical service provided at the Respiratory Clinic. Any citizens with COVID-19 suspected respiratory symptoms call the COVID-19 hotline and visit the Respiratory Clinic if required. Responding to COVID-19 outbreaks will be a continual process, and the screening system is essential support to public health interventions, and crucial in the response to a surge in COVID-19 cases.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A resposta da Coreia do Sul à pandemia de COVID-19: lições aprendidas e recomendações a gestores
    Thais Regis Aranha Rossi, Catharina Leite Matos Soares, Gerluce Alves Silva, Jairnilson Silva Paim, Lígia Maria Vieira-da-Silva
    Cadernos de Saúde Pública.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Health, Economic and Social Development Challenges of the COVID-19 Pandemic: Strategies for Multiple and Interconnected Issues
    Sigamani Panneer, Komali Kantamaneni, Udhayakumar Palaniswamy, Lekha Bhat, Robert Ramesh Babu Pushparaj, Kesavan Rajasekharan Nayar, Hilaria Soundari Manuel, F. X. Lovelina Little Flower, Louis Rice
    Healthcare.2022; 10(5): 770.     CrossRef
  • Role of Primary Care and Challenges for Public–Private Cooperation during the Coronavirus Disease 2019 Pandemic: An Expert Delphi Study in South Korea
    Woo-young Shin, Changsoo Kim, Sei Young Lee, Won Lee, Jung-ha Kim
    Yonsei Medical Journal.2021; 62(7): 660.     CrossRef
The Impact of Social Distancing on the Transmission of Influenza Virus, South Korea, 2020
Young June Choe, Jong-Koo Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2020;11(3):91-92.   Published online June 1, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2020.11.3.07
  • 5,583 View
  • 253 Download
  • 16 Citations
PDF

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Impact of COVID-19 Social Distancing Mandates on Gastrointestinal Pathogen Positivity: Secondary Data Analysis
    Tanner Palmer, L Scott Benson, Christina Porucznik, Lisa H Gren
    JMIR Public Health and Surveillance.2022; 8(8): e34757.     CrossRef
  • Exploring the drop in flu cases during the 2020–2021 season: The Italian case study
    Fabrizio Bert, Eleonora Cugudda, Giuseppina Lo Moro, Pietro Francesco Galvagno, Roberta Siliquini
    Annals of Epidemiology.2022; 76: 77.     CrossRef
  • Effect of COVID-19-Related Interventions on the Incidence of Infectious Eye Diseases: Analysis of Nationwide Infectious Disease Incidence Monitoring Data
    Woo-Ri Lee, Li-Hyun Kim, Gyeong-Min Lee, Jooyoung Cheon, Young Dae Kwon, Jin-Won Noh, Ki-Bong Yoo
    International Journal of Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Solidarity is for other people: identifying derelictions of solidarity in responses to COVID-19
    Peter West-Oram
    Journal of Medical Ethics.2021; 47(2): 65.     CrossRef
  • Impact of social distancing on incidence of vaccine‐preventable diseases, South Korea
    Hyo Eun Yun, Bo Young Ryu, Young June Choe
    Journal of Medical Virology.2021; 93(3): 1814.     CrossRef
  • Nonpolio Enterovirus Activity during the COVID-19 Pandemic, Taiwan, 2020
    Shu-Chen Kuo, Hsiao-Hui Tsou, Hsiao-Yu Wu, Ya-Ting Hsu, Fang-Jing Lee, Shu-Man Shih, Chao A. Hsiung, Wei J. Chen
    Emerging Infectious Diseases.2021; 27(1): 306.     CrossRef
  • Impact of non-pharmaceutical interventions targeted at COVID-19 pandemic on influenza burden – a systematic review
    Lara Marleen Fricke, Stephan Glöckner, Maren Dreier, Berit Lange
    Journal of Infection.2021; 82(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Epidemiological dynamics of enterovirus D68 in the United States and implications for acute flaccid myelitis
    Sang Woo Park, Margarita Pons-Salort, Kevin Messacar, Camille Cook, Lindsay Meyers, Jeremy Farrar, Bryan T. Grenfell
    Science Translational Medicine.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Qualitative Analysis of an influenza model with biomedical interventions
    S.A. Pedro, H. Rwezaura, A. Mandipezar, J.M. Tchuenche
    Chaos, Solitons & Fractals.2021; 146: 110852.     CrossRef
  • The Impact of COVID-19 Interventions on Influenza and Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Infection
    Yiman Geng, Gang Li, Leiliang Zhang
    Frontiers in Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Shifting Patterns of Respiratory Virus Activity Following Social Distancing Measures for Coronavirus Disease 2019 in South Korea
    Sangshin Park, Ian C Michelow, Young June Choe
    The Journal of Infectious Diseases.2021; 224(11): 1900.     CrossRef
  • Asthma, Allergic Rhinitis, and Atopic Dermatitis Incidence in Korean Adolescents before and after COVID-19
    Hyo Geun Choi, Il Gyu Kong
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2021; 10(15): 3446.     CrossRef
  • Impact of Social Distancing on Kawasaki Disease-associated Hospitalization, South Korea
    Jung Hwangbo, Jue Seong Lee, Seung Ah Choe, Young June Choe
    Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal.2021; 40(10): e383.     CrossRef
  • Surveillance of seasonal respiratory viruses among Chilean patients during the COVID ‐19 pandemic
    Luis A. Alonso‐Palomares, C. Joaquín Cáceres, Rodrigo Tapia, Paulina Aguilera‐Cortés, Santiago Valenzuela, Fernando Valiente‐Echeverría, Ricardo Soto‐Rifo, Aldo Gaggero, Gonzalo P. Barriga
    Health Science Reports.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Social Distance Scale (v1): A Screening Instrument to Assess Patient Adherence to Prevention Strategies during Pandemics
    Michaela Prachthauser, Jeffrey E. Cassisi, Thien-An Le, Andel V. Nicasio
    International Journal of Environmental Research an.2020; 17(21): 8158.     CrossRef
  • Psychological Typhoon Eye Effect During the COVID-19 Outbreak
    Guixiang Wang, Yan Zhang, Simiao Xie, Pu Wang, Guanghui Lei, Yueran Bian, Fei Huang, Jingyuan Zhang, Xiaochen Cao, Na Luo, Mingyan Luo, Qiang Xiao
    Frontiers in Public Health.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
National Action Plan for Response to Poliovirus Importation
Kyung Min Song, Young June Choe, Heeyeon Cho, Geun-Ryang Bae, Jong-Koo Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2011;2(1):65-71.   Published online June 30, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2011.04.003
  • 1,912 View
  • 14 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
The Division of Vaccine-Preventable Disease Control and National Immunization Program of the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has prepared a plan of action as a guide for key actions that will be taken if a poliovirus outbreak occurs in the Republic of Korea. The history of poliomyelitis and vaccination against poliovirus in the nation was reviewed and the routine surveillance procedures that are currently in place were described. The principles and specific actions for an effective response to a poliovirus outbreak were prepared. The guidelines clearly outline the actions to be taken in case of a polio outbreak. When a suspected case of poliovirus infection is reported, an immediate epidemiological investigation is to be conducted. The response to a poliovirus outbreak includes case isolation, management of potential contacts and immunization. All stakeholders are to be made aware of what key actions should be taken at each stage of the response to a poliovirus outbreak in the nation.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Non-Polio Enteroviruses from Acute Flaccid Paralysis Surveillance in Korea, 2012–2019
    Youngsil Yoon, Yong-Pyo Lee, Deog-Yong Lee, Hye-Jin Kim, June-Woo Lee, Sangwon Lee, Chun Kang, Wooyoung Choi, Joong Hyun Bin, Young Hoon Kim, Myung-Guk Han, Hae Ji Kang
    Viruses.2021; 13(3): 411.     CrossRef
  • Estimation of the Direct Cost of Poliomyelitis Rehabilitation Treatment to Pakistani Patients: A 53-Year Retrospective Study
    Atta Abbas Naqvi, Syed Baqir Shyum Naqvi, Fatima Zehra, Ashutosh Kumar Verma, Saman Usmani, Sehrish Badar, Rizwan Ahmad, Niyaz Ahmad
    Applied Health Economics and Health Policy.2018; 16(6): 871.     CrossRef
  • Revision of the National Action Plan in Response to Poliovirus Importation in Korea
    Young-Joon Park, Joon-Woo Kim, Yoon Hyung Kwon, Geun-Ryang Bae, Duk-Hyoung Lee
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2013; 4(2): 117.     CrossRef
  • Fires in the Neighborhood
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2013; 4(2): 67.     CrossRef
  • The Road Less Traveled
    Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2011; 2(1): 1.     CrossRef
Surveillance and Control of Rubella in the Republic of Korea From 2001 to 2009: The Necessity for Enhanced Surveillance to Monitor Congenital Rubella Syndrome
Young June Choe, Sang Taek Lee, Kyung Min Song, Heeyeon Cho, Geun-Ryang Bae, Jong-Koo Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2010;1(1):23-28.   Published online December 31, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2010.12.007
  • 1,825 View
  • 15 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The aim of this study was to review the epidemiologic data of rubella and congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) supplied by surveillance systems from 2001 to 2009 and to propose measures to improve the quality of the surveillance system in the Republic of Korea.
Methods
The epidemiological data for rubella and CRS cases reported to the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from 2001 to 2009 were retrospectively reviewed, and insurance reimbursement data from the Korea National Health Insurance Review Agency were collected for comparison.
Results
The number of yearly reported rubella cases to the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from 2001 to 2009 was 128, 24, 8, 24, 15, 12, 35, 30, and 36, respectively. The occurrence of rubella shifted to a slightly higher age group during the 9-year period, i.e. from 0–9 years to 10–19 years. Among the 309 reported rubella cases, three were confirmed cases of CRS. In addition, according to data sourced from Health Insurance Review Agency, 24, 19, 19, 9, and 5 CRS cases were reported for medical insurance reimbursement from 2005 to 2009, respectively.
Conclusion
According to available surveillance data, the reported cases of rubella and CRS were not high, but a more detailed surveillance with emphasis on susceptible women of childbearing age is necessary for better monitoring and control of rubella and CRS in the Republic of Korea.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Rubella seroepidemiology among Korean women: Two decades after a combined vaccination strategy
    Seung-Ah Choe, Young June Choe, Jin Young Paek
    International Journal of Infectious Diseases.2020; 94: 25.     CrossRef
  • Laboratory confirmation of congenital rubella syndrome in South Korea in 2017: A genomic epidemiological investigation
    Jin-Sook Wang, Hye Min Lee, Su Jin Kim, Jun-Sub Kim, Chun Kang, Chae won Jung, Hye kyung In, Dong Hee Seo, Dong Han Lee, Yoon-Seok Chung
    Vaccine.2020; 38(44): 6868.     CrossRef
  • TORCH (toxoplasmosis, rubella, cytomegalovirus, and herpes simplex virus) screening of small for gestational age and intrauterine growth restricted neonates: efficacy study in a single institute in Korea
    Mi Hae Chung, Chan Ok Shin, Juyoung Lee
    Korean Journal of Pediatrics.2018; 61(4): 114.     CrossRef
  • Does Rubella Cause Autism: A 2015 Reappraisal?
    Jill Hutton
    Frontiers in Human Neuroscience.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Immunogenicity and safety of a tetravalent measles-mumps-rubella-varicella vaccine: an open-labeled, randomized trial in healthy Korean children
    Sung-Ho Cha, Seon-Hee Shin, Taek-jin Lee, Chang Hwi Kim, Michael Povey, Hwang Min Kim, Ouzama Nicholson
    Clinical and Experimental Vaccine Research.2014; 3(1): 91.     CrossRef

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives