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Yong-Pyo Lee 2 Articles
Detection and Isolation of SARS-CoV-2 in Serum, Urine, and Stool Specimens of COVID-19 Patients from the Republic of Korea
Jeong-Min Kim, Heui Man Kim, Eun Jung Lee, Hye Jun Jo, Youngsil Yoon, Nam-Joo Lee, Junseock Son, Ye-Ji Lee, Mi Seon Kim, Yong-Pyo Lee, Su-Jin Chae, Kye Ryeong Park, Seung-Rye Cho, Sehee Park, Su Jin Kim, Eunbyeol Wang, SangHee Woo, Aram Lim, Su-Jin Park, JunHyeong Jang, Yoon-Seok Chung, Bum Sik Chin, Jin-Soo Lee, Duko Lim, Myung-Guk Han, Cheon Kwon Yoo
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2020;11(3):112-117.   Published online May 8, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2020.11.3.02
  • 9,544 View
  • 502 Download
  • 74 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Coronavirus Disease-19 (COVID-19) is a respiratory infection characterized by the main symptoms of pneumonia and fever. It is caused by the novel coronavirus severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), which is known to spread via respiratory droplets. We aimed to determine the rate and likelihood of SARS-CoV-2 transmission from COVID-19 patients through non-respiratory routes.

Methods

Serum, urine, and stool samples were collected from 74 hospitalized patients diagnosed with COVID-19 based on the detection of SARS-CoV-2 in respiratory samples. The SARS-CoV-2 RNA genome was extracted from each specimen and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction performed. CaCo-2 cells were inoculated with the specimens containing the SARS-COV-2 genome, and subcultured for virus isolation. After culturing, viral replication in the cell supernatant was assessed.

Results

Of the samples collected from 74 COVID-19 patients, SARS-CoV-2 was detected in 15 serum, urine, or stool samples. The virus detection rate in the serum, urine, and stool samples were 2.8% (9/323), 0.8% (2/247), and 10.1% (13/129), and the mean viral load was 1,210 ± 1,861, 79 ± 30, and 3,176 ± 7,208 copy/µL, respectively. However, the SARS-CoV-2 was not isolated by the culture method from the samples that tested positive for the SARS-CoV-2 gene.

Conclusion

While the virus remained detectable in the respiratory samples of COVID-19 patients for several days after hospitalization, its detection in the serum, urine, and stool samples was intermittent. Since the virus could not be isolated from the SARS-COV-2-positive samples, the risk of viral transmission via stool and urine is expected to be low.

Anti-Human Rhinovirus 1B Activity of Dexamethasone viaGCR-Dependent Autophagy Activation
Jae-Sug Lee, Seong-Ryeol Kim, Jae-Hyoung Song, Yong-Pyo Lee, Hyun-Jeong Ko
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2018;9(6):334-339.   Published online December 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2018.9.6.07
  • 2,546 View
  • 60 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) are the major cause of the common cold. Currently there is no registered, clinically effective, antiviral chemotherapeutic agent to treat diseases caused by HRVs. In this study, the antiviral activity of dexamethasone (DEX) against HRV1B was examined.

Methods

The anti–HRV1B activity of DEX was assessed by sulforhodamine B assay in HeLa cells, and by RT-PCR in the lungs of HRV1B-infected mice. Histological evaluation of HRV1B-infected lungs was performed and a histological score was given. Anti-HRV1B activity of DEX via the glucocorticoid receptor (GCR)-dependent autophagy activation was assessed by blocking with chloroquine diphosphate salt or bafilomycin A1 treatment.

Results

In HRV1B-infected HeLa cells, treatment with DEX in a dose-dependent manner, resulted in a cell viability of > 70% indicating that HRV1B viral replication was reduced by DEX treatment. HRV1B infected mice treated with DEX, had evidence of reduced inflammation and a moderate histological score. DEX treatment showed antiviral activity against HRV1B via GCR-dependent autophagy activation.

Conclusion

This study demonstrated that DEX treatment showed anti-HRV1B activity via GCR-dependent autophagy activation in HeLa cells and HRV1B infected mice. Further investigation assessing the development of topical formulations may enable the development of improved DEX effectiveness.


PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives