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Wook-Gyo Lee 3 Articles
Detection of Novel Coronavirus on the Surface of Environmental Materials Contaminated by COVID-19 Patients in the Republic of Korea
Sang-Eun Lee, Deog-Yong Lee, Wook-Gyo Lee, ByeongHak Kang, Yoon Suk Jang, Boyeong Ryu, SeungJae Lee, Hyunjung Bahk, Eungyu Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2020;11(3):128-132.   Published online May 8, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2020.11.3.03
  • 6,579 View
  • 267 Download
  • 20 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

This study aimed to determine the presence of SARS-CoV-2 on surfaces frequently touched by COVID-19 patients, and assess the scope of contamination and transmissibility in facilities where the outbreaks occurred. In the course of this epidemiological investigation, a total of 80 environmental specimens were collected from 6 hospitals (68 specimens) and 2 “mass facilities” (6 specimens from a rehabilitation center and 6 specimens from an apartment building complex). Specific reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction targeting of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and envelope genes, were used to identify the presence of this novel coronavirus. The 68 specimens from 6 hospitals (A, B, C, D, E, and G), where prior disinfection/cleaning had been performed before environmental sampling, tested negative for SARS-CoV-2. However, 2 out of 12 specimens (16.7%) from 2 “mass facilities” (F and H), where prior disinfection/cleaning had not taken place, were positive for SARS-CoV-2 RNA polymerase, and envelope genes. These results suggest that prompt disinfection and cleaning of potentially contaminated surfaces is an effective infection control measure. By inactivating SARS-CoV-2 with disinfection/cleaning the infectivity and transmission of the virus is blocked. This investigation of environmental sampling may help in the understanding of risk assessment of the COVID-19 outbreak in “mass facilities” and provide guidance in using effective disinfectants on contaminated surfaces.

Citations

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  • Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) research agenda for healthcare epidemiology
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  • SARS-CoV-2 on Surfaces and HVAC Filters in Dormitory Rooms
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    The Journal of Infectious Diseases.2022; 225(9): 1554.     CrossRef
  • Environmental Contamination with SARS-CoV-2 in Hospital COVID Department: Antigen Test, Real-Time RT-PCR and Virus Isolation
    Urška Rozman, Lea Knez, Goran Novak, Jernej Golob, Anita Pulko, Mojca Cimerman, Matjaž Ocepek, Urška Kuhar, Sonja Šostar Turk
    COVID.2022; 2(8): 1050.     CrossRef
  • Using Environmental Sampling to Enable Zoonotic Pandemic Preparedness
    Avirup Sanyal, Sanskriti Agarwal, Uma Ramakrishnan, Kritika M. Garg, Balaji Chattopadhyay
    Journal of the Indian Institute of Science.2022; 102(2): 711.     CrossRef
  • Anforderungen an die Hygiene bei der Reinigung und Desinfektion von Flächen

    Bundesgesundheitsblatt - Gesundheitsforschung - Ge.2022; 65(10): 1074.     CrossRef
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    Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry.2021; 413(1): 49.     CrossRef
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    Montse Marquès, José L. Domingo
    Environmental Research.2021; 193: 110559.     CrossRef
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    Noah Bedrosian, Elizabeth Mitchell, Elsa Rohm, Miguel Rothe, Christine Kelly, Gabrielle String, Daniele Lantagne
    Environmental Science & Technology.2021; 55(7): 4162.     CrossRef
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    Craig S Conover
    Clinical Infectious Diseases.2021; 72(11): 2062.     CrossRef
  • Investigation of SARS CoV-2 virus in environmental surface
    Abdollah Dargahi, Farhad Jeddi, Mehdi Vosoughi, Chiman Karami, Aidin Hadisi, S. Ahamad Mokhtari, Hasan Ghobadi, Morteza Alighadri, Somayeh Biparva Haghighi, Hadi Sadeghi
    Environmental Research.2021; 195: 110765.     CrossRef
  • Ist die Desinfektion öffentlicher Flächen zur Prävention von SARS-CoV-2 – infektionen sinnvoll?
    Günter Kampf, Lutz Jatzwauk
    Das Gesundheitswesen.2021; 83(03): 180.     CrossRef
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    Günter Kampf, Stephanie Pfaender, Emanuel Goldman, Eike Steinmann
    Hygiene.2021; 1(1): 24.     CrossRef
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    Environmental Research.2021; 202: 111809.     CrossRef
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    Taewon Han, Boyeong Ryu, Suyeon Lee, Yugyeong Song, Yoongje Jeong, Ilhwan Kim, Jeongmin Kim, Eunjin Kim, Wonjun Lee, Hyunju Lee, Haekyoung Hwang
    One Health.2021; 13: 100328.     CrossRef
  • Non-Respiratory Droplet Transmission of COVID-19 in the Isolation Ward of a Secondary Hospital in Oman
    Zayid K. Al Mayahi, Nawal Al Kindi, Nasser Al Shaqsi, Noaman Al Hattali, Azza Al Hattali, Khalid Salim, Mark Beatty
    Infectious Diseases in Clinical Practice.2021; 29(6): e371.     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of antiviral metal and metal oxide thin-film coatings against human coronavirus 229E
    Louis-Vincent Delumeau, Hatameh Asgarimoghaddam, Tamiru Alkie, Alexander James Bryan Jones, Samantha Lum, Kissan Mistry, Marc G. Aucoin, Stephanie DeWitte-Orr, Kevin P. Musselman
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Prediction Forecast for Culex tritaeniorhynchus Populations in Korea
Nam-Hyun Kim, Wook-Gyo Lee, E-Hyun Shin, Jong Yul Roh, Hae-Chun Rhee, Mi Yeoun Park
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(3):131-137.   Published online June 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.04.004
  • 1,883 View
  • 25 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Japanese encephalitis is considered as a secondary legal infectious disease in Korea and is transmitted by mosquitoes in the summer season. The purpose of this study was to predict the ratio of Culex tritaeniorhynchus to all the species of mosquitoes present in the study regions.
Methods
From 1999 to 2012, black light traps were installed in 10 regions in Korea (Busan, Gyeonggi, Gangwon, Chungbuk, Chungnam, Jeonbuk, Jeonnam, Gyeongbuk, Gyeongnam, and Jeju) to capture mosquitoes for identification and classification under a dissecting microscope. The number of mosquitoes captured/week was used to calculate its daily occurrence (mosquitoes/trap/night). To predict the characteristics of the mosquito population, an autoregressive model of order p (AR(p)) was used to execute the out-of-sample prediction and the in-sample estimation after presumption.
Results
Compared with the out-of-sample method, the sample-weighted regression method's case was relatively superior for prediction, and this method predicted a decrease in the frequency of Cx. tritaeniorhynchus for 2013. However, the actual frequency of this species showed an increase in frequency. By contrast, the frequency rate of all the mosquitoes including Cx. tritaeniorhynchus gradually decreased.
Conclusion
The number of patients with Japanese encephalitis has been strongly associated with the occurrence and density of vector mosquitoes, and the importance of this infectious disease has been highlighted since 2010. The 2013 prediction indicated an increase after an initial decrease, although the ratio of the two mosquito species decreased. The increase in vector density may be due to changes in temperature and the environment. Thus, continuous prevalence prediction is warranted.

Citations

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  • Joint spatiotemporal modelling reveals seasonally dynamic patterns of Japanese encephalitis vector abundance across India
    Lydia H. V. Franklinos, David W. Redding, Tim C. D. Lucas, Rory Gibb, Ibrahim Abubakar, Kate E. Jones, Andrew S. Azman
    PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.2022; 16(2): e0010218.     CrossRef
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    Alioune Gaye, Moussa Moïse Diagne, El Hadji Ndiaye, Marie Henriette Dior Ndione, Martin Faye, Cheikh Talla, Gamou Fall, Yamar Ba, Diawo Diallo, Ibrahima Dia, Pascal Handschumacher, Ousmane Faye, Amadou Alpha Sall, Mawlouth Diallo
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    Parasites & Vectors.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
Susceptibility and Resistance of Field Populations of Anopheles sinensis (Diptera: Culicidae) Collected from Paju to 13 Insecticides
Kyu-Sik Chang, Dae-Hyun Yoo, E-Hyun Shin, Wook-Gyo Lee, Jong Yeol Roh, Mi Yeoun Park
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2013;4(2):76-80.   Published online April 30, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.02.001
  • 1,874 View
  • 19 Download
  • 10 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Over 20% of all malaria cases reported annually in the Republic of Korea (ROK) occur in Paju, Gyeonggi Province. Vector control for malaria management is essential, but the insecticide resistance of the vector, Anopheles mosquitoes, has been a major obstacle in implementing effective control. In this study, the insecticide resistance of the vector mosquitoes was evaluated and compared with that of vector mosquitoes collected from the same locality in 2001 and 2009.
Methods
The insecticide resistance of Anopheles sinensis s.s. collected from Paju, Gyeonggi Province in the ROK was evaluated under laboratory conditions with a micro-application method using 13 insecticides currently used by local public health centers and pest control operators in the ROK.
Results
Based on median lethal dose (LC50) values, An. sinensis s.s. were most susceptible to the insecticides bifenthrin, cyfluthrin, and etofenprox in that order, and least susceptible to permethrin. An. sinensis showed higher susceptibility to pyrethroids than organophosphates, except for fenthion and permethrin. In a comparative resistance test, the resistance ratios (RRs) of An. sinensis collected in 2012 (AS12) to the 13 insecticides were compared to the RRs of two strains of An. sinensis collected from the same locality in 2001 (AS01) and 2008 (AS08). With some exceptions, AS12 demonstrated higher resistance to all tested insecticides compared to AS01 and AS08, and less resistance to bifenthrin, cyfluthrin, and cypermethrin compared to AS01.
Conclusion
These results indicate that careful selection and rotation of these insecticides may result in continued satisfactory control of field populations of An. sinensis s.s. for effective malaria management in Paju.

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PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives