Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Author index

Page Path
HOME > Articles and issues > Author index
Search
Sung Min Son 2 Articles
Influence of Obesity on Postural Stability in Young Adults
Sung Min Son
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2016;7(6):378-381.   Published online December 31, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2016.10.001
  • 1,298 View
  • 17 Download
  • 16 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The purpose of this study was to determine whether obesity is associated with less postural stability in young adults, and whether it is influenced by anterior pelvic tilt angle and sensory dysfunction.
Methods
Center of gravity (COG) velocity and total sway distance with eyes open or eyes closed on firm or foam floors were determined in 12 obese individuals and 12 individuals with normal weight.
Results
On firm and foam floors with eyes closed, center of gravity velocity and total sway distance were significantly greater in the obese group than in the normal-weight group. However, on firm and foam floors with eyes open, center of gravity velocity and total sway distance were not significantly different in the two groups.
Conclusion
The clinical implication of our findings is that obese young adults exhibit poor postural stability. Our findings also suggested that postural instability in obese individuals is associated with increased lordosis due to abdominal fat and poor integration of plantar somatosensory input.
Time-varying Changes in Pulmonary Function with Exposure to Prolonged Sitting
Kyung Woo Kang, Sung Min Son, Yu Min Ko
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2016;7(6):382-384.   Published online December 31, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2016.11.005
  • 1,337 View
  • 17 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The purpose of this study was to quantify the time-varying changes in pulmonary function with exposure to prolonged sitting.
Methods
Twenty-one healthy volunteers were recruited. The pulmonary function of all participants was measured three times in order to assess changes over time; pulmonary function was measured before sitting, after participants had been seated for 1 hour, and after they had been seated for 2 hours. A spirometer was used to measure pulmonary function. The recorded values were forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity (forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity), and peak expiratory flow.
Results
All measured values were significantly different before sitting and after 1 hour of sitting. There were also significant differences between all measurements taken before sitting and after 2 hours of sitting. However, the measurements taken after 1 hour and 2 hours of sitting did not significantly differ.
Conclusion
These findings suggest that significant changes in pulmonary function occur relatively quickly when human beings are seated.

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives