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Seung Eun Lee 2 Articles
Neighborhood Deprivation and Unmet Health Care Needs: A Multilevel Analysis of Older Individuals in South Korea
Seung Eun Lee, Miyeon Yeon, Chul-Woung Kim, Tae-Ho Yoon, Dongjin Kim, Jihee Choi
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2019;10(5):295-306.   Published online October 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2019.10.5.06
  • 12,510 View
  • 69 Download
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

In this study the relationship between neighborhood deprivation and the unmet health care needs of elderly individuals (≥ 65 years) was examined. Some previous studies suggested that neighborhood characteristics affect access to health care, yet research on the unmet needs of older individuals is limited.

Methods

Multilevel logistic regression analysis was used to assess the relationship of neighborhood-level factors with unmet health care needs due to costs, adjusting for individual-level factors, in individuals ≥ 65 years in the 2017 Korean Community Health Survey (n = 63,388).

Results

There were 2.6% of elderly individuals who experienced unmet health care needs due to costs. Following adjustment for individual and neighborhood characteristics, the neighborhood deprivation in urban areas was found to have an inverse association with unmet needs (odds ratio = 0.50; 95% confidence interval = 0.24–1.06) for the most deprived quartile versus the least deprived quartile). However, in rural areas neighborhood deprivation was not a significant variable. Among the individual-level variables, household income was one of the strongest correlates with unmet needs in both urban and rural areas.

Conclusion

The present findings suggest that targeted policy interventions reflecting both neighborhood and individual characteristics, should be implemented to reduce the unmet health care needs of elderly individuals.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • What are the factors affecting older adults’ experience of unmet healthcare needs amid the COVID-19 pandemic in Korea?
    Sujin Kim, Jongnam Hwang
    BMC Geriatrics.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Linking neighbourhood safety and children's internalizing and externalizing problems: Mediating role of maternal depression
    Youngmin Cho
    Child & Family Social Work.2023; 28(4): 1089.     CrossRef
  • Urban-Rural Differences in the Prevalence of Depressive Symptoms in Korean Adults
    Ji-An Jeong, Sun A Kim, Jung Ho Yang, Min-Ho Shin
    Chonnam Medical Journal.2023; 59(2): 128.     CrossRef
  • PhaVIP: Phage VIrion Protein classification based on chaos game representation and Vision Transformer
    Jiayu Shang, Cheng Peng, Xubo Tang, Yanni Sun
    Bioinformatics.2023; 39(Supplement): i30.     CrossRef
  • Dashboard to analyze associations of socio-economic and environmental inequality of regions with health indicators. Guidelines
    A. A. Zelenina, S. A. Shalnova, S. A. Maksimov
    Cardiovascular Therapy and Prevention.2023; 22(7): 3652.     CrossRef
  • The Older Persons' Index of Multiple Deprivation: Measuring the deprivation circumstances of older populations in Aotearoa New Zealand
    Daniel J. Exeter, Michael Browne, Tommi Robinson-Chen, Jessie Colbert, Ngaire Kerse, Arier Lee
    Health & Place.2022; 76: 102850.     CrossRef
  • The Contribution of Material, Behavioral, Psychological, and Social-Relational Factors to Income-Related Disparities in Cardiovascular Risk Among Older Adults
    Chiyoung Lee, Qing Yang, Eun-Ok Im, Eleanor Schildwachter McConnell, Sin-Ho Jung, Hyeoneui Kim
    Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing.2021; 36(4): E38.     CrossRef
  • Association between community deprivation and practising health behaviours among South Korean adults: a survey-based cross-sectional study
    Bich Na Jang, Hin Moi Youn, Doo Woong Lee, Jae Hong Joo, Eun-Cheol Park
    BMJ Open.2021; 11(6): e047244.     CrossRef
Analyzing the Historical Development and Transition of the Korean Health Care System
Sang-Yi Lee, Chul-Woung Kim, Nam-Kyu Seo, Seung Eun Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2017;8(4):247-254.   Published online August 31, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2017.8.4.03
  • 4,273 View
  • 39 Download
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Many economically advanced countries have attempted to minimize public expenditures and pursue privatization based on the principles of neo-liberalism. However, Korea has moved contrary to this global trend. This study examines why and how the Korean health care system was formed, developed, and transformed into an integrated, single-insurer, National Health Insurance (NHI) system.

Methods

We describe the transition in the Korean health care system using an analytical framework that incorporates such critical variables as government economic development strategies and the relationships among social forces, state autonomy, and state power. This study focuses on how the relationships among social forces can change as a nation’s economic development or governing strategy changes in response to changes in international circumstances such as globalization.

Results

The corporatist Social Health Insurance (SHI) system (multiple insurers) introduced in 1977 was transformed into the single-insurer NHI in July 2000. These changes were influenced externally by globalization and internally by political democratization, keeping Korea’s private-dominant health care provision system unchanged over several decades.

Conclusion

Major changes such as integration reform occurred, when high levels of state autonomy were ensured. The state’s power (its policy capability), based on health care infrastructures, acts to limit the direction of any change in the health care system because it is very difficult to build the infrastructure for a health care system in a short timeframe.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Estimation of the benefit from pre‐emptive genotyping based on the nationwide cohort data in South Korea
    Ki Young Huh, Sejung Hwang, Joo Young Na, Kyung‐Sang Yu, In‐Jin Jang, Jae‐Yong Chung, Seonghae Yoon
    Clinical and Translational Science.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Lessons from health insurance responses in counteracting COVID-19: a qualitative comparative analysis of South Korea and three influential countries
    Hey Jin Ko, Eunji Yun, Boryung Ahn, Hyejin Lee, Won Mo Jang, Jin Yong Lee
    Archives of Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Role of Primary Care and Challenges for Public–Private Cooperation during the Coronavirus Disease 2019 Pandemic: An Expert Delphi Study in South Korea
    Woo-young Shin, Changsoo Kim, Sei Young Lee, Won Lee, Jung-ha Kim
    Yonsei Medical Journal.2021; 62(7): 660.     CrossRef
  • The sociopolitical context of the COVID-19 response in South Korea
    Hani Kim
    BMJ Global Health.2020; 5(5): e002714.     CrossRef
  • Post-COVID healthcare reform in India: What to expect?
    SohamD Bhaduri
    Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care.2020; 9(11): 5427.     CrossRef
  • The Story of Korean Health Insurance System
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2017; 8(4): 235.     CrossRef

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives