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Sanggon Nam 2 Articles
Obesity and Asian Americans in the United States: Systematic Literature Review
Sanggon Nam
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2013;4(4):187-193.   Published online August 31, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.06.001
  • 1,837 View
  • 18 Download
  • 14 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Obesity is one of the most serious health problems in the world today. Asian Americans are usually less overweight and obese than African Americans and Hispanic Americans, but the rate of obesity in Asian Americans is still increasing, especially in younger generations. This research examines Asian American obesity using existing research, as a means of finding the need for greater emphasis on Asian American obesity intervention research.
Methods
In this research literature review, Asian American obesity using existing research as a means of finding the need for greater emphasis on Asian American obesity intervention research is examined. A systematic review is done in order to find Asian American obesity research, due to the minimal amount of existing studies. In total, there were only nine papers which were not duplicates and which still met the criteria for inclusion, from an initial 106 papers.
Results
There is very little research on obesity in Asian Americans. Although the rate of obesity among Asian Americans is increasing, there are few related articles, projects, and surveys, and there is little information. There is a need for more specific and in-depth analysis of Asian American obesity. Asian Americans are associated with a lower waist circumference (WC) and BMI, while Hawaiian/Pacific Islanders are associated with a higher WC and BMI. Typically, Asian Americans who were born in the United States (US) tend to be overweight and more obese than those born in foreign countries.
Conclusion
Based on this literature review, it is concluded that there is a shortage of Asian American obesity research, even though there is an evident need for particular obesity intervention programs that target Asian Americans.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The posterior tibial artery free flap for head and neck reconstruction
    Alexandra E. Kejner
    Current Opinion in Otolaryngology & Head & Neck Su.2022; 30(5): 358.     CrossRef
  • Heterogeneity in Obesity Prevalence Among Asian American Adults
    Nilay S. Shah, Cecily Luncheon, Namratha R. Kandula, Sadiya S. Khan, Liping Pan, Cathleen Gillespie, Fleetwood Loustalot, Jing Fang
    Annals of Internal Medicine.2022; 175(11): 1493.     CrossRef
  • Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Behavior Among Asian Americans: A Thematic Analysis
    Chia-Liang Dai, Manoj Sharma, Taj Haider, Hema Sunchu
    Journal of Primary Care & Community Health.2021; 12: 215013272098477.     CrossRef
  • The effect of racial discrimination on mental and physical health: A propensity score weighting approach
    Shanting Chen, Allen B. Mallory
    Social Science & Medicine.2021; 285: 114308.     CrossRef
  • Ethnic Enclaves and Pregnancy and Behavior Outcomes Among Asian/Pacific Islanders in the USA
    Andrew D. Williams, Lynne C. Messer, Jenna Kanner, Sandie Ha, Katherine L. Grantz, Pauline Mendola
    Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities.2020; 7(2): 224.     CrossRef
  • Developing a Socioculturally Nuanced Systems Model of Childhood Obesity in Manhattan’s Chinese American Community via Group Model Building
    Ewelina Swierad, Terry T.-K. Huang, Ellis Ballard, Karen Flórez, Sheng Li
    Journal of Obesity.2020; 2020: 1.     CrossRef
  • Healthy Living Behaviors Among Chinese–American Preschool-Aged Children: Results of a Parent Survey
    Virginia Rall Chomitz, Alison Brown, Victoria Lee, Aviva Must, Kenneth Kwan Ho Chui
    Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health.2018; 20(4): 926.     CrossRef
  • Obesity Prevention Behaviors in Asian Indian Adolescent Girls: A Pilot Study
    Annie Thomas, Linda Janusek
    Journal of Pediatric Nursing.2018; 42: 9.     CrossRef
  • Filipinos Fit and Trim - A feasible and efficacious DPP-based intervention trial
    Melinda S. Bender, Bruce A. Cooper, Elena Flowers, Raymond Ma, Shoshana Arai
    Contemporary Clinical Trials Communications.2018; 12: 76.     CrossRef
  • The neighborhood environment and obesity: Understanding variation by race/ethnicity
    Michelle S. Wong, Kitty S. Chan, Jessica C. Jones-Smith, Elizabeth Colantuoni, Roland J. Thorpe, Sara N. Bleich
    Preventive Medicine.2018; 111: 371.     CrossRef
  • STRIVE, San Diego! Methodology of a Community-Based Participatory Intervention to Enhance Healthy Dining at Asian and Pacific Islander Restaurants
    Sarah Oropeza, Mary Grace Sadile, Chantine Nguyen Phung, Moana Cabiles, Sandy Spackman, Myleen Abuan, Fe Seligman, Maria Rosario Araneta
    Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior.2018; 50(3): 297.     CrossRef
  • Geographic differences in obesity prevalence and its risk factors among Asian Americans: findings from the 2013–2014 California Health Interview Survey
    Shaoqing Gong, Kesheng Wang, Ying Li, Arsham Alamian
    Scientific Reports.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • American Heart Association’s Ideal Cardiovascular Health Metrics in Under-Represented Asian Americans
    Freda Patterson, Guo Zhang, Adam Davey, Yin Tan, Grace X. Ma
    Journal of Community Health.2016; 41(6): 1282.     CrossRef
  • Genes and the intergenerational transmission of BMI and obesity
    Timothy J. Classen, Owen Thompson
    Economics & Human Biology.2016; 23: 121.     CrossRef
The Effects of Religious Attendance and Obesity on Health by Race/Ethnicity
Sanggon Nam
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2013;4(2):81-88.   Published online April 30, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.03.002
  • 1,649 View
  • 13 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The objectives of this paper are to examine the effects of religion and obesity on health and determine how the relationship varies by racial/ethnic groups with data from the Panel Study of American Race and Ethnicity (PS-ARE).
Methods
Using ordinal logistic regression, the effects of religion and obesity on self-rated health and how the relationship varies by racial/ethnic groups are investigated. Additionally, to determine whether certain ethnic groups are more impacted by the frequency of religious attendance and obesity, whites, blacks, and Hispanics are analyzed separately with ordinal logistic regression.
Results
When obesity was added in focal relationship between religious services attendance and self-rated health strengthened this focal relationship which is a suppression effect between religious services attending and self-rated health adding obesity. For BMI is also significantly associated with decreased odds of reporting better health–normal weight (OR = 2.99; 95% CI = 2.43–3.67) and overweight (OR = 2.19; 95% CI = 1.79–2.68) compared to obese. Subjects who attend religious services 1–2 time a year (OR = 1.30; 95% CI = 1.04–1.62) and 1–3 times a month (OR = 1.28; 95% CI = 1.05–1.57) are associated with increased odds of reporting better health. In whites, attending religious services 1–2 times a year are associated with increased odds of reporting better health (OR = 1.48; 95% CI = 1.09–2.00) and 1–3 times a month are also associated with increased odds of reporting health (OR = 1.34; 95% CI = 1.02–1.78) compared to never attending religious attendance. The frequency of religious services attendance of blacks and Hispanics are not associated with self-rated health. For BMI, being white is more positively associated with increased odds of reporting better health than black and Hispanic subjects. Although white subjects are less likely to attend religious services more frequently than black and Hispanic subjects, the influence on self-rated health in white subjects is more evidenced than other racial/ethnic groups.
Conclusions
Although it was not proven that the association between participation in religious services and self-rated health is mediated by obesity, the research shows the suppression effect of obesity between participation in religious services and self-rated health.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Effect of Hajj Trip on Mental Health: A Longitudinal Study
    Mansooreh Fateh, Seyed Abbas Mousavi, Mohammad Bagher Sohrabi, Mohsen Arabi, Mohammad Hassan Emamian
    Journal of Religion and Health.2020; 59(3): 1319.     CrossRef
  • The Role of Religious Behavior in Health Self-Management: A Community-Based Participatory Research Study
    Jane Pfeiffer, Hong Li, Maybelline Martez, Tim Gillespie
    Religions.2018; 9(11): 357.     CrossRef
  • Impact of religious attendance on psychosocial outcomes for individuals with traumatic brain injury: A NIDILRR funded TBI Model Systems study
    Angela Philippus, David Mellick, Therese O’Neil-Pirozzi, Thomas Bergquist, Yelena Guller Bodien, Angelle M. Sander, Laura E. Dreer, Joseph Giacino, Thomas Novack
    Brain Injury.2016; 30(13-14): 1605.     CrossRef

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives