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Sang Kwang Lee 2 Articles
Long-term Treatment with Anti-platelet Agents for Collagen-induced Arthritis Improves Radiological Findings
Chan Kim, Toyou Kim, Jihyung Yoo, Dong-Hyuk Sheen, Sang Kwang Lee, Eun-Hye Choi, Tong Jin Chun, Seong-wook Kang, Seung-Cheol Shim, Mi-Kyoung Lim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2017;8(3):179-184.   Published online June 30, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2017.8.3.04
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  • 16 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The objectives of this study were to evaluate the long-term effect of anti-platelet treatment on the radiological progression of collagen-induced arthritis in rats.

Methods

Female Lewis rats with collagen-induced arthritis were divided into three experimental groups: saline, aspirin monotherapy (n = 12), and aspirin–clopidogrel dual therapy (n = 12). Drugs were administered daily and continued up to 70 days after the induction of arthritis. The clinical arthritis index (weight, morphology score, and paw thickness) and radiological scores were evaluated.

Results

The clinical arthritis index peaked on day 20, while the radiological scores peaked on day 35. No intergroup difference was observed in the clinical arthritis index throughout the experiment. The aspirin–clopidogrel dual therapy group had a significantly higher mean radiological score than the other groups (p = 0.045) on day 35. Further treatments resulted in significantly improved radiological findings in the aspirin monotherapy and aspirin–clopidogrel dual therapy groups on day 70 but no significant improvement in the saline group.

Conclusion

Anti-platelet agent treatment improved radiological findings on day 70. These observations emphasize the importance of a future long-term study of the effects of anti-platelet agent treatment on arthritis.

Rapid DNA Extraction from Dried Blood Spots on Filter Paper: Potential Applications in Biobanking
Eun-Hye Choi, Sang Kwang Lee, Chunhwa Ihm, Young-Hak Sohn
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(6):351-357.   Published online December 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.09.005
  • 1,354 View
  • 21 Download
  • 30 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Dried blood spot (DBS) technology is a microsampling alternative to traditional plasma or serum sampling for pharmaco- or toxicokinetic evaluation. DBS technology has been applied to diagnostic screening in drug discovery, nonclinical, and clinical settings. We have developed an improved elution protocol involving boiling of blood spots dried on Whatman filter paper.
Methods
The purpose of this study was to compare the quality, purity, and quantity of DNA isolated from frozen blood samples and DBSs. We optimized a method for extraction and estimation of DNA from blood spots dried on filter paper (3-mm FTA card). A single DBS containing 40 μL blood was used.
Results
DNA was efficiently extracted in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or Tris-EDTA (TE) buffer by incubation at 37°C overnight. DNA was stable in DBSs that were stored at room temperature or frozen. The housekeeping genes GAPDH and beta-actin were used as positive standards for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) validation of general diagnostic screening.
Conclusion
Our simple and convenient DBS storage and extraction methods are suitable for diagnostic screening by using very small volumes of blood collected on filter paper, and can be used in biobanks for blood sample storage.

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives