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Mahmood Moosazadeh 7 Articles
Enrolment Phase Results of the Tabari Cohort Study: Comparing Family History, Lipids and Anthropometric Profiles Among Diabetic Patients
Mahmood Moosazadeh, Mahdi Afshari, Kaveh Jafari, Motahareh Kheradmand, Zahra Kashi, Mohsen Aarabi, Adeleh Bahar, Mohammad Khademloo
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2019;10(5):289-294.   Published online October 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2019.10.5.05
  • 3,480 View
  • 59 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Different factors are responsible for the silent epidemic of diabetes mellitus in developing and developed countries. This study aimed to determine the role of demographic factors, lipid profile, family history (the estimation of genetic association) and anthropometric factors on diabetes onset.

Methods

Data from the enrolment phase of the Tabari Cohort study was applied for this study and included 10,255 participants aged between 35–70 years. Anthropometric variables were measured by trained staff using standard tools. Blood specimens were collected for lipid profile and blood glucose measurements. Data analyses were performed using SPSS version 24, with univariate and multivariate logistic regression.

Results

The prevalence of diabetes mellitus was estimated to be 17.2% in the cohort population, 15.6% in men, and 18.3% in women. The adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for age groups 40–49, 50–59 and over 60 were 2.58 (2.20–3.69), 5.80 (4.51–7.48) and 8.72 (6.67–11.39), respectively. In addition, the odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for 2 (or more), and 1 affected family member were 4.12 (3.55–4.90) and 2.34 (2.07–2.65), respectively. Triglyceride concentrations more than 500, and abnormal high-density lipoprotein levels increased the odds of diabetes mellitus by 3.29- and 1.18-fold, respectively.

Conclusion

The current study showed that old age and a family history were strong predictors for diabetes mellitus.

Citations

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  • Prevalence and determinants of diabetes and prediabetes in southwestern Iran: the Khuzestan comprehensive health study (KCHS)
    Sanam Hariri, Zahra Rahimi, Nahid Hashemi-Madani, Seyyed Ali Mard, Farnaz Hashemi, Zahra Mohammadi, Leila Danehchin, Farhad Abolnezhadian, Aliasghar Valipour, Yousef Paridar, Mohammad Mahdi Mir-Nasseri, Alireza Khajavi, Sahar Masoudi, Saba Alvand, Bahman
    BMC Endocrine Disorders.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Prevalence of Enterobius vermicularis among Children in Iran: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
Mahmood Moosazadeh, Ghasem Abedi, Mahdi Afshari, Seif Ali Mahdavi, Fereshteh Farshidi, Elham Kheradmand
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2017;8(2):108-115.   Published online April 30, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2017.8.2.02
  • 3,215 View
  • 56 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Enterobius vermicularis is a parasitic disease that is common in crowded areas such as schools and kindergartens. Primary investigations of electronic evidence have reported different prevalences of E. vermicularis in Iran. Therefore, we aimed to estimate the total prevalence of this infection among Iranian children using a meta-analysis.

Methods

Relevant studies were identified in national and international databases. We selected eligible papers for meta-analysis after investigating titles, abstracts, and full texts; assessing study quality; and applying inclusion/exclusion criteria. Data were extracted by two independent researchers. The results were combined using a random effects model in Stata v. 11 software.

Results

Among 19 eligible articles including 11,676 participants, the prevalences of E. vermicularis among all children, boys, and girls were 1.2%–66.1%, 2.3%–65.5%, and 1.7%–65.5%, respectively. Pooled prevalences (95% confidence interval) of E. vermicularis among all children, boys, and girls were 17.2% (12.6%–21.8%), 17.2% (12.6%–21.8%), and 16.9% (9.03%–24.8%), respectively.

Conclusion

This meta-analysis showed that a great majority of Iranian children are infected with E. vermicularis, possibly due to poor public health.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Enterobiasis and its risk factors in urban, rural and indigenous children of subtropical Argentina
    Maria Romina Rivero, Carlos De Angelo, Constanza Feliziani, Song Liang, Karina Tiranti, Martin Miguel Salas, Oscar Daniel Salomon
    Parasitology.2022; 149(3): 396.     CrossRef
  • Investigation of the Prevalence of Enterobius Vermicularis Infection and Risk Factors among Kindergartens in Hamadan, West of Iran, in 2019
    Mohammad Fallah, Mahdi Parsaei, Eissa Soleymani, Ali Jamshidizad, Afshin Azimi
    Avicenna Journal of Clinical Medicine.2022; 28(4): 253.     CrossRef
  • Epidemiologic Study of Enterobius vermicularis Infection among Schoolchildren in the Republic of Marshall Islands
    Chia-Kwung Fan, Pasaikou Sonko, Yueh-Lun Lee, Ai-Wen Yin, Ting-Wu Chuang, Ramson Kios, Ying-Ting Wang, Chia-Mei Chou, Shao-Lun Hsu, Mai-Szu Wu, Jia-Wei Lin, Chia-Ying Tu, Pedro P. Chieffi
    Journal of Tropical Medicine.2021; 2021: 1.     CrossRef
  • The neglected role of Enterobius vermicularis in appendicitis: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Ali Taghipour, Meysam Olfatifar, Ehsan Javanmard, Mojtaba Norouzi, Hamed Mirjalali, Mohammad Reza Zali, Paulo Lee Ho
    PLOS ONE.2020; 15(4): e0232143.     CrossRef
  • Demographic and clinical characteristics of familial and sporadic multiple sclerosis: A single center exploratory study from Abu Dhabi
    Antonia Ceccarelli, Victoria Ann Mifsud, Amna Dogar
    Journal of Clinical Neuroscience.2020; 76: 145.     CrossRef
  • Halk Sağlığı Uygulamalarının Enterobius Vermicularis’in Korunma ve Kontrolündeki Önemi
    Kamuran ÖZDİL, Nimet KARATAŞ, Handan ZİNCİR
    Nevşehir Bilim ve Teknoloji Dergisi.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and genotype distribution of Enterobius vermicularis among kindergarteners in Shiraz and Khorramabad cities, Iran
    Atefeh Tavan, Fattaneh Mikaeili, SeyedMahmoud Sadjjadi, Sara Bajelan, Hossein Mahmoudvand, Meysam Sharifdini
    Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Medicine.2020; 13(7): 308.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of Enterobius vermicularis in Prima-ry School Children of Bushehr, Iran in 2011
    Morad Ali Fouladvand, Ali Heydari, Afshin Barazesh
    Iranian South Medical Journal.2018; 21(2): 125.     CrossRef
Estimating Tuberculin Skin Test Reactions among Children and Teenagers Who Received the Bacillus Calmette-Guerin Vaccination at Birth: A Meta-analysis
Mohammad Sadegh Rezai, Siavosh Abedi, Mahdi Afshari, Mahmood Moosazadeh
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2017;8(1):3-10.   Published online February 28, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2017.8.1.02
  • 2,794 View
  • 25 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Tuberculin skin reaction size is one indicator of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine efficacy and a way to diagnose latent infection. Several primary studies have examined this issue. Combining the results of these studies using a meta-analysis will provide reliable evidence regarding this indicator for policymakers. This study aimed to estimate the total frequency of different tuberculin skin test reactions among Iranian children and teenagers who received the BCG vaccination at birth.

Methods

National and international databanks were searched using relevant keywords. After the search strategy was restricted and duplicates were excluded, the titles and abstracts of the remaining papers were screened. All included studies included healthy children who received the BCG vaccine without confirmed tuberculosis exposure. Heterogeneity of the results was assessed using the Cochrane test and I2 index showed the random effects model as the best model for estimating the pooled results.

Results

We combined the results of 14 primary studies including purified protein derivative reaction test measures of 26,281 Iranian children. The frequencies (95% confidence intervals) of the reactions were 8.5% (6.2–10.8) for patients with a reaction size ≥ 10 mm, 29.9% (22.3–37.4) for a reaction size of 5–9 mm, and 60% (48.9–71.1) for a reaction size < 5 mm.

Conclusion

Our study showed that large numbers of Iranian children and teens have no positive BCG vaccine reaction and a considerable number of children have been exposed to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Comparison of Serum Immunoglobulin Levels and Lymphocyte Counts in Children with Lymphadenitis Following BCG Vaccination
    Leila Barati, Arash Kalantari, Jalaladdin Sheikh, Fateme-Sadat Tabatabaee, Farshid Kompani, Maryam Najafinejad, Ahmad Sohrabi, Fatemeh Cheraghali
    Iranian Journal of Pediatrics.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Is latent tuberculosis infection challenging in Iranian health care workers? A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Mohammad Hossein YektaKooshali, Farahnaz Movahedzadeh, Ali Alavi Foumani, Hoda Sabati, Alireza Jafari, HASNAIN SEYED EHTESHAM
    PLOS ONE.2019; 14(10): e0223335.     CrossRef
Comparing Two Methods of Cryotherapy and Intense Pulsed Light with Triamcinolone Injection in the Treatment of Keloid and Hypertrophic Scars: A Clinical Trial
Simin Shamsi Meymandi, Mahmood Moosazadeh, Azadeh Rezazadeh
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2016;7(5):313-319.   Published online October 31, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2016.08.005
  • 1,987 View
  • 15 Download
  • 10 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Keloid and hypertrophic scars are abnormal manifestations of wounds that occur following skin injuries in the form of local proliferation of fibroblasts and increased production of collagen. There are several ways to cure these scars; treatment must be selected based on the nature of the scars. In this clinical trial, two methods—cryotherapy and intense pulsed light (IPL)—are compared in the treatment of scars, and the results are presented in terms of improvement level, complications, and patient satisfaction.
Methods
This clinical trial was conducted in southeastern Iran. The intervention group included scars that underwent the IPL method and the control group, which consisted of scars that were subjected to cryotherapy. In both methods, intralesional corticosteroid injection was administered. To select samples, the easy sampling method was used. To determine the expected outcomes, the criteria determined in the Vancouver scar scale were used. Data were analyzed using the Mix Model, chi-square test, and t test.
Results
In this study, 166 samples of keloid and hypertrophic scars were cured using two methods (Cryotherapy, 83; IPL, 83). The recovery rate was higher in the Cryotherapy group than in the IPL group (p > 0.05), and the incidence of complications was also higher in the Cryotherapy group (14.5% vs. 12%). Moreover, patients were more satisfied, although not significantly so, with the cryotherapy method (p = 0.09).
Conclusion
Both methods were highly successful in curing scars; participants were totally satisfied with both methods.

Citations

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  • A systematic review of randomised controlled trials investigating laser assisted drug delivery for the treatment of keloid and hypertrophic scars
    Kelvin Truong, Ines Prasidha, Tevi Wain
    Lasers in Medical Science.2022; 37(1): 47.     CrossRef
  • Diagnosis, Treatment, and Management of Painful Scar: A Narrative Review
    Alaa Abd-Elsayed, Jason Pope, Derick A Mundey, Konstantin V Slavin, Steven Falowski, Ahish Chitneni, Stephen R Popielarski, Jarod John, Samuel Grodofsky, Tony Vanetesse, Michael A Fishman, Philip Kim
    Journal of Pain Research.2022; Volume 15: 925.     CrossRef
  • Cryotherapy: treatment spectrum and setting up the service
    Paul Charlson
    Journal of Aesthetic Nursing.2021; 10(1): 6.     CrossRef
  • Intense pulsed light versus cryotherapy in the treatment of hypertrophic scars: A clinical and histopathological study
    Samar A.M. Salem, Sharief M. Abdel Hameed, Azza E. Mostafa
    Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology.2021; 20(9): 2775.     CrossRef
  • Comparative Efficacy and Safety of Common Therapies in Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
    Yawei Bao, Shanshan Xu, Zhipeng Pan, Jixiang Deng, Xinyi Li, Faming Pan, Xiaojing Li
    Aesthetic Plastic Surgery.2020; 44(1): 207.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of Nd:YAG Laser and Combined Intense Pulsed Light and Radiofrequency in the Treatment of Hypertrophic Scars
    Mohamed M. Khedr, Wael Hussein Mahmoud, Fersan A. Sallam, Nader Elmelegy
    Annals of Plastic Surgery.2020; 84(5): 518.     CrossRef
  • Monoclonal Antibodies Addressed to Factors of Signalization in Keloid Scars: Opportunities and Areas of Action
    Erick Moreno Pizarro, Eduardo Morales Valencia, Arturo Pérez Cuéllar, Camilo Acuña Pinzon, Aarón Emanuel Serrano Padilla
    Cureus.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Treatment of hypertrophic scars and keloids using an intralesional 1470 nm bare-fibre diode laser: a novel efficient minimally-invasive technique
    Ke Li, Fabio Nicoli, Chunxiao Cui, Wen Jing Xi, Ahmed Al-Mousawi, Zheng Zhang, Alberto Balzani, Lindsay Neill, Roberto Sorge, Yun Tong, Yixin Zhang
    Scientific Reports.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Topical cryoanesthesia for the relief of pain caused by steroid injections used to treat hypertrophic scars and keloids
    Xiuxia Wang, Xiaoli Wu, Ke Liu, Lingling Xia, Xunxun Lin, Wei Liu, Zhen Gao
    Medicine.2017; 96(43): e8353.     CrossRef
  • Comparing Efficacy and Tolerability of Triamcinolone and Verapamil in Treatment of Hypertrophic Scars and Keloids
    Abbas Zamanian, Maryam Nokandeh, Elham Behrangi, Zeynab Fazel, Zahra Azizian
    Journal of Skin and Stem Cell.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
Epidemiological and Clinical Features of People with Malta Fever in Iran: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Mahmood Moosazadeh, Roja Nikaeen, Ghasem Abedi, Motahareh Kheradmand, Saeid Safiri
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2016;7(3):157-167.   Published online June 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2016.04.009
  • 2,191 View
  • 20 Download
  • 13 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Numerous studies have reported the epidemiological and clinical features of Malta fever incidence in Iran. Review and synthesis of the related literature through meta-analysis can provide an appropriate measurement for aforementioned indices. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine the epidemiological and clinical features of people with Malta fever in Iran.
Methods
The required documents were obtained through searching national and international databases. In each study, standard deviation of the indices was calculated using binomial distribution formulas. Finally, the heterogeneity index was determined between studies using Cochran (Q) and I2 tests.
Results
Combining the results of 47 articles in the meta-analysis indicated that 57.6% (55.02–60.1%) and 42.3% (49.8–44.9%) of the patients were male and female, respectively. Most of the patients lived in rural areas; 68.4% (63.6–73.2%) compared to 31.4% (26.7–36.3%). In addition, 20.8% (17.4–24.2%) of the patients were ranchers and farmers, 16.9% (14.5–19.4%) were students, and 31.6% (27–36.2%) were housewives. Of the patients studies, 50.5% (35.6–65.2%) experienced contact with animals and 57.1% (46.4–67.9%) used unpasteurized dairy products. Fever, joint pain, and sweating were detected among 65.7% (53.7–77.8%) and 55.3% (44.4–66.2%), respectively.
Conclusion
The present study revealed that the frequency of male patients with brucellosis was considerably more than that of female patients. The number of patients with Malta fever in rural areas was significantly more than in urban areas. High-risk behavior, unprotected contact with animals, and using unpasteurized dairy products were among the most significant factors affecting Malta fever incidence in Iran. Fever, joint pain, and sweating were detected among most of the patients with Malta fever.

Citations

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  • Toponyms in dermatology
    Heera Ramesh, Sachin Somashekar
    Indian Journal of Dermatology.2022; 67(3): 279.     CrossRef
  • Brucella pleurisy: An extremely rare complication of brucellosis
    Ahmad Alikhani, Hamideh Abbaspour Kasgari, Haadi Majidi, Zahra Nekoukar
    Clinical Case Reports.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Design and validation of brucellosis prevention questionnaire focused on animal vaccination
    Farhad Bahadori, Fazlollah Ghofranipour, Saeideh Ghaffarifar, Reza Ziaei
    BMC Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Forecasting the monthly incidence rate of brucellosis in west of Iran using time series and data mining from 2010 to 2019
    Hadi Bagheri, Leili Tapak, Manoochehr Karami, Zahra Hosseinkhani, Hamidreza Najari, Safdar Karimi, Zahra Cheraghi, Esteban Tlelo-Cuautle
    PLOS ONE.2020; 15(5): e0232910.     CrossRef
  • Epidemiologically characteristics of human brucellosis and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of Brucella melitensis in Hinggan League of the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China
    Hai-Tao Yuan, Cheng-Ling Wang, Li-Na Liu, Dan Wang, Dan Li, Zhen-Jun Li, Zhi-Guo Liu
    Infectious Diseases of Poverty.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Brucellosis: Evaluation of Two Hundred and Ten Cases with Different Clinical Features
    Esma Eroglu, Bahar Kandemir
    Annals of the Academy of Medicine, Singapore.2020; 49(7): 462.     CrossRef
  • A comparison of three data mining time series models in prediction of monthly brucellosis surveillance data
    Nasrin Shirmohammadi‐Khorram, Leili Tapak, Omid Hamidi, Zohreh Maryanaji
    Zoonoses and Public Health.2019; 66(7): 759.     CrossRef
  • Human brucellosis caused by raw dairy products: A review on the occurrence, major risk factors and prevention
    Maryam Dadar, Youcef Shahali, Adrian M. Whatmore
    International Journal of Food Microbiology.2019; 292: 39.     CrossRef
  • Epidemiological, Clinical and Paraclinical Evaluation of Recorded Cases with Brucellosis in Kermanshah Province Health Center 2012 - 2016
    Hossein Hatami, Ali Ramezankhani, Farahnaz Shekarchi
    Journal of Kermanshah University of Medical Scienc.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Epidemiological, risk factors, clinical, and laboratory features of brucellosis in the Southwest of Iran within 2009–2015
    Mahmood Nabavi, Hossein Hatami, Hedayatollah Jamaliarand
    International Journal of Preventive Medicine.2019; 10(1): 108.     CrossRef
  • Meta-Analysis of the Changes of Peripheral Blood T Cell Subsets in Patients with Brucellosis
    Rongjiong Zheng, Songsong Xie, Shaniya Niyazi, Xiaobo Lu, Lihua Sun, Yan Zhou, Yuexin Zhang, Kai Wang
    Journal of Immunology Research.2018; 2018: 1.     CrossRef
  • A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Epidemiology and Clinical Manifestations of Human Brucellosis in China
    Rongjiong Zheng, Songsong Xie, Xiaobo Lu, Lihua Sun, Yan Zhou, Yuexin Zhang, Kai Wang
    BioMed Research International.2018; 2018: 1.     CrossRef
  • The clinical features of 590 patients with brucellosis in Xinjiang, China with the emphasis on the treatment of complications
    Bin Jia, Fengbo Zhang, Ying Lu, Wenbao Zhang, Jun Li, Yuexin Zhang, Jianbing Ding, Mazin Barry
    PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.2017; 11(5): e0005577.     CrossRef
Comparing Seasonal Pattern of Laboratory Confirmed Cases of Pertussis with Clinically Suspected Cases
Golam Reza Ghorbani, Seyed Mohsen Zahraei, Mahmood Moosazadeh, Mahdi Afshari, Fahimeh Doosti
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2016;7(2):131-137.   Published online April 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2016.02.004
  • 1,837 View
  • 18 Download
  • 10 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
During recent decades, there has been limited attention on the seasonal pattern of pertussis within a high vaccine coverage population. This study aimed to compare the seasonal patterns of clinical suspected pertussis cases with those of laboratory confirmed cases in Iran.
Methods
The current study was conducted using time series methods. Time variables included months and seasons during 2011–2013. The effects of seasons and months on the incidence of pertussis were estimated using analysis of variance or Kruskal–Wallis.
Results
The maximum average incidence of clinically confirmed pertussis was 23.3 in July (p = 0.04), but the maximum incidence of clinical suspected pertussis was 115.7 in May (p = 0.6). The maximum seasonal incidences of confirmed and clinical pertussis cases were reported in summer (average: 12, p = 0.004), and winter (average: 108.1; p = 0.4), respectively.
Conclusion
The present study showed that the seasonal pattern of laboratory confirmed pertussis cases is highly definite and different from the pattern of clinical suspected cases.

Citations

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  • Bordetella pertussis in School-Age Children, Adolescents, and Adults: A Systematic Review of Epidemiology, Burden, and Mortality in the Middle East
    Denis Macina, Keith E. Evans
    Infectious Diseases and Therapy.2021; 10(2): 719.     CrossRef
  • Pertussis epidemiology and effect of vaccination among diagnosed children at Vietnam, 2015‐2018
    Nhung T. H. Pham, Nhan D. T. Le, Ngai K. Le, Khoa D. Nguyen, Mattias Larsson, Linus Olson, Dien M. Tran
    Acta Paediatrica.2020; 109(12): 2685.     CrossRef
  • Spatial distribution of vaccine-preventable diseases in central Iran in 2015–2018: A GIS-based study
    Abolfazl Mohammadbeigi, Abedin Saghafipour, Nahid Jesri, Fatemeh Zahra Tarkhan, Moharram Karami Jooshin
    Heliyon.2020; 6(9): e05102.     CrossRef
  • The comparative performance of wavelet‐based outbreak detector, exponential weighted moving average, and Poisson regression‐based methods in detection of pertussis outbreaks in Iranian infants: A simulation‐based study
    Yousef Alimohamadi, Seyed Mohsen Zahraei, Manoochehr Karami, Mehdi Yaseri, Mojtaba Lotfizad, Kourosh Holakouie‐Naieni
    Pediatric Pulmonology.2020; 55(12): 3497.     CrossRef
  • Alarm Thresholds for Pertussis Outbreaks in Iran: National Data Analysis
    Yousef Alimohamadi, Seyed Mohsen Zahraei, Manoochehr Karami, Mehdi Yaseri, Mojtaba Lotfizad, Kourosh Holakouie-Naieni
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2020; 11(5): 309.     CrossRef
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    BMC Medicine.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Johannes Bogner
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    R. N. F. Leong, J. G. Wood, R. M. Turner, A. T. Newall
    Epidemiology and Infection.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Yongbin Wang, Chunjie Xu, Zhende Wang, Shengkui Zhang, Ying Zhu, Juxiang Yuan, Lei Lin
    PLOS ONE.2018; 13(12): e0208404.     CrossRef
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    Shima Mahmoudi, Maryam Banar, Babak Pourakbari, Hediyeh Sadat Alavi, Hamid Eshaghi, Alireza Aziz Ahari, Setareh Mamishi
    Prague Medical Report.2018; 119(1): 61.     CrossRef
Prevalence of Head Lice Infestation and Its Associated Factors among Primary School Students in Iran: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
Mahmood Moosazadeh, Mahdi Afshari, Hormoz Keianian, Asghar Nezammahalleh, Ahmad Ali Enayati
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2015;6(6):346-356.   Published online December 31, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2015.10.011
  • 2,262 View
  • 20 Download
  • 29 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Head lice infestation is one of the most important health problems, generally involving children aged 5–13 years. This study aims to estimate the prevalence of head lice infestation and its associated factors among primary school children using systematic review and meta-analysis methods.
Methods
Different national and international databases were searched for selecting the relevant studies using appropriate keywords, Medical Subject Heading terms, and references. Relevant studies with acceptable quality for meta-analysis were selected having excluded duplicate and irrelevant articles, quality assessment, and application of inclusion/exclusion criteria. With calculating standard errors according to binomial distribution and also considering the Cochrane's Q test as well as I-squared index for heterogeneity, pediculosis prevalence rate was estimated using Stata SE V.11 software.
Results
Forty studies met the inclusion criteria of this review and entered into the meta-analysis including 200,306 individuals. Using a random effect model, the prevalence (95% confidence interval) of head lice infestation among primary school children was estimated as 1.6% (1.2–2.05), 8.8% (7.6–9.9), and 7.4% (6.6–8.2) for boys, girls, and all the students, respectively. The infestation rate was found to be associated with low educational level of parents, long hair, family size, mother's job (housewife), father's job (worker/unemployed), using a common comb, lack of bathrooms in the house, and a low frequency of bathing.
Conclusion
This meta-analysis revealed that the prevalence of head lice infestation among Iranian primary school children is relatively high with more prevalence among girls. We also found that economic, social, cultural, behavioral, and hygienic factors are associated with this infestation.

Citations

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  • Pediculosis capitis; the importance of accurate differentiation of nits and hair casts
    Afrooz Boukan, Leila Mohebi, Roya Rashti, Akram Boukan, Mohammad Ali Oshaghi
    International Journal of Tropical Insect Science.2022; 42(1): 647.     CrossRef
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    Minoo Moghimi, Zahra Nekoukar, Ali Sharifpour, Zakaria Zakariaei, Mahdi Fakhar, Mostafa Soleymani
    Clinical Case Reports.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Razie Toghroli, Zahra Hosseini, Arash Ziapour, Asiyeh Yari, Seyyede Fateme Rahimi, Nafiul Mehedi
    INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, .2022; 59: 004695802210863.     CrossRef
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    Arash Jafari, Seyed Mostafa Ra, Hajar Khazraei, Arash Babaei, Vahid Reza Ostov
    Journal of Medical Sciences.2022; 22(3): 99.     CrossRef
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    J. Mohammadi, H. Alipour, K. Azizi, M. Shahriari-Namadi, M. Kalantari, S. Ebrahimi, M.D. Moemenbellah-Fard
    Parasite Epidemiology and Control.2022; 18: e00252.     CrossRef
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    Mohsen Najjari, Mohammad Amin Gorouhi, Hossein Zarrinfar, Bibi Razieh Hosseini Farash, Jamshid Jamali, Elham Moghaddas, Mohammad Ebrahimipuor
    BMC Pediatrics.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives