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Lydia Sarponmaa Asante 2 Articles
Comparative Study of the Impact of Intoxication on Injuries in China and Korea
Lydia Sarponmaa Asante, Maxine Newell, Mieun Yun, Sunmee Yun-Welch, Sungsoo Chun
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2015;6(1):27-33.   Published online February 28, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2015.01.002
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  • 13 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Alcohol misuse has been widely studied as a substantial contributor to injured patients' visits to emergency departments. The current research studied differences in alcohol-related injury variables in China and Korea.
Methods
Data were collected from a sample of 4,509 patients (2,862 males and 1,667 females) reporting at emergency departments in China and Korea using the World Health Organization collaborative study on alcohol and injuries protocol.
Results
More injuries were reported by men, young people aged 25–34 years, employed individuals, and persons who had at least a high-school education. The proportion of injury cases among intoxicated patients was 14% for Chinese and 20% for Koreans. The odds of intentional injuries to intoxicated patients increased significantly when the perpetrator had been drinking, especially for severely intoxicated victims in both countries. The odds of injuries for intoxicated persons in both countries were high during sports and leisure activities; odds ratio (OR) = 3.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.76–5.59 for Chinese and OR = 10.97, 95% CI = 6.06–19.85 for Koreans.
Conclusion
These findings are a contribution to research in the two Asian countries about the effect of intoxication on injuries especially when both victim and perpetrator are intoxicated.
A Study of High-Risk Drinking Patterns Among Generations Based on the 2009 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
Yeongseon Hong, Sungsoo Chun, Mieun Yun, Lydia Sarponmaa Asante, Chaeshin Chu
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(1):46-53.   Published online February 28, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.01.006
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  • 15 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The aim of this study was to identify how the drinking patterns of a generation on the paternal side affect those of the next generations by estimating the number of high-risk drinkers by generation according to the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test.
Methods
Data were selected from the 2009 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey conducted by the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and were analyzed using SPSS 18.0.
Results
Later generations started drinking earlier (62.4%, 71.8% and 91.1%, respectively). The majority of the second generation consumed more than 2–4 drinks a month (83.7%), but only a small proportion experienced difficulty in everyday life (9.6%), felt repentance (9.6%), or experienced memory loss (17.9%) after drinking. Unmarried third-generation adults with high-risk-drinking fathers reported more frequent alcohol consumption [odds ratio (OR) 1.441), greater amounts on one occasion (>7 cups for men, OR 1.661; > 5 cups for women, OR 2.078), temperance failure (OR 2.377), and repentance after drinking (OR 1.577). Unmarried third-generation adults with high-risk-drinking grandfathers consumed greater amounts of alcohol on one occasion (OR 3.642), and unmarried third-generation women more frequently consumed large amounts of alcohol (>5 cups, OR 4.091). Unmarried third-generation adults with high-risk-drinking fathers were more likely to exhibit high-risk drinking patterns (OR 1.608). Second-generation individuals from a high-risk-drinking first generation were more likely to engage in high-risk drinking (OR 3.705).
Conclusion
High-risk drinking by a generation significantly affects the high-risk drinking patterns of subsequent generations.

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives