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Kyung Woo Kang 2 Articles
Effects of Exercise on Cervical Angle and Respiratory Function in Smartphone Users
Na Kyung Lee, Sang In Jung, Do Youn Lee, Kyung Woo Kang
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2017;8(4):271-274.   Published online August 31, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2017.8.4.07
  • 1,848 View
  • 42 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The aim of this study was to determine whether exercises can change the cervical angle and respiratory function in smartphone users.

Methods

Thirty healthy volunteers were recruited. The subjects were randomly divided into an exercise group and a control group. All participants used a smartphone for 1 hour while maintaining a sitting posture. Then, each group performed their assigned activity. The exercise group performed two types of exercises and the control group maintained routine activities for 20 minutes. To investigate the changes in cervical angle and respiratory function, we measured the craniovertebral angle by using a spirometer.

Results

Statistically significant differences were noted in the craniovertebral angle, forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), FEV1/FVC ratio, peak expiratory flow, maximal inspiratory pressure, and maximal expiratory pressure of the two groups (p < 0.05).

Conclusion

Our findings showed that proper exercise could be a good method of improving the cervical angle and respiratory function in smartphone users.

Time-varying Changes in Pulmonary Function with Exposure to Prolonged Sitting
Kyung Woo Kang, Sung Min Son, Yu Min Ko
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2016;7(6):382-384.   Published online December 31, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2016.11.005
  • 1,328 View
  • 17 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The purpose of this study was to quantify the time-varying changes in pulmonary function with exposure to prolonged sitting.
Methods
Twenty-one healthy volunteers were recruited. The pulmonary function of all participants was measured three times in order to assess changes over time; pulmonary function was measured before sitting, after participants had been seated for 1 hour, and after they had been seated for 2 hours. A spirometer was used to measure pulmonary function. The recorded values were forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity (forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity), and peak expiratory flow.
Results
All measured values were significantly different before sitting and after 1 hour of sitting. There were also significant differences between all measurements taken before sitting and after 2 hours of sitting. However, the measurements taken after 1 hour and 2 hours of sitting did not significantly differ.
Conclusion
These findings suggest that significant changes in pulmonary function occur relatively quickly when human beings are seated.

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives