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Jung Eun Cho 6 Articles
Comparison of the Epidemiological Aspects of Imported Dengue Cases between Korea and Japan, 2006–2010
Young Eui Jeong, Won-Chang Lee, Jung Eun Cho, Myung-Guk Han, Won-Ja Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2016;7(1):71-74.   Published online February 28, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2015.12.001
  • 1,881 View
  • 17 Download
  • 12 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
To compare the epidemiological characteristics of dengue cases imported by travelers or immigration in both Korea and Japan, we determined dengue incidence and related risk factors. During 2006–2010, 367 and 589 imported dengue cases were reported in Korea and Japan, respectively. In Korea, the presumptive origins for the dengue infections were Southeast Asia (82.6%), Southern Asia (13.9%), Eastern Asia (1.1%), South America (0.3%), Central America (0.3%), Africa (0.3%), and other countries (1.6%). In Japan, the origins of the infections were Southeast Asia (69.8%), Southern Asia (20.0%), Eastern Asia (1.7%), South America (2.5%), Central America (1.2%), Africa (1.2%), Oceania (2.4%), and other countries (1.2%). In both countries, more dengue cases were reported for men than for women (p < 0.01), and those aged 20–30 years accounted for > 60% of the total cases. The frequency of imported cases in summer and autumn (∼70% of total cases) was similar in both countries. This study demonstrates that there is a similar pattern of imported dengue cases in Korea and Japan. Therefore, there is a risk of an autochthonous dengue outbreak in Korea, as indicated by the recent outbreak in Japan in 2014.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Molecular and Haematological Analysis of Dengue Virus-3 Among Children in Lahore, Pakistan
    Muhammad Kashif, Muhammad Afzal, Basit Zeshan, Hasnain Javed, Salma Batool, Modasrah Mazhar
    Jundishapur Journal of Microbiology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Molecular evolution of dengue virus types 1 and 4 in Korean travelers
    Eun-Ha Hwang, Green Kim, Hoyin Chung, Hanseul Oh, Jong-Hwan Park, Gyeung Haeng Hur, JungJoo Hong, Bon-Sang Koo
    Archives of Virology.2021; 166(4): 1103.     CrossRef
  • Aedes albopictus and Aedes flavopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) pre-imaginal abundance patterns are associated with different environmental factors along an altitudinal gradient
    Luis Fernando Chaves, Mariel D. Friberg
    Current Research in Insect Science.2021; 1: 100001.     CrossRef
  • Evolution, heterogeneity and global dispersal of cosmopolitan genotype of Dengue virus type 2
    Surya Pavan Yenamandra, Carmen Koo, Suzanna Chiang, Han Shi Jeri Lim, Zhen Yuan Yeo, Lee Ching Ng, Hapuarachchige Chanditha Hapuarachchi
    Scientific Reports.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Temporal Trend of Aedes albopictus in Local Urban Parks of the Republic of Korea
    Myung-Jae Hwang, Jong-Hun Kim, Heung-Chul Kim, Myung Soon Kim, Terry A Klein, Juhwa Choi, Kisung Sim, Yeonseung Chung, Yadav Prasad Joshi, Hae-Kwan Cheong, Kristen Healy
    Journal of Medical Entomology.2020; 57(4): 1082.     CrossRef
  • A Two-Patch Mathematical Model for Temperature-Dependent Dengue Transmission Dynamics
    Jung Kim, Yongin Choi, James Kim, Sunmi Lee, Chang Lee
    Processes.2020; 8(7): 781.     CrossRef
  • Potential effects of climate change on dengue transmission dynamics in Korea
    Hyojung Lee, Jung Eun Kim, Sunmi Lee, Chang Hyeong Lee, Shamala Devi Sekaran
    PLOS ONE.2018; 13(6): e0199205.     CrossRef
  • Analysis of dengue virus burden and serotypes pattern in Faisalabad, 2016–2017
    Muhammad Yousaf, Kashaf Junaid, Muhammad Sarfaraz Iqbal, Imran Aslam, Sheraz Ahmad, Muhammad Aqeel, Usman Ali Ashfaq, Saba Khaliq, Muhammad Usman Ghani, Nayyar Waqar
    Future Virology.2018; 13(4): 245.     CrossRef
  • Seroprevalence of Toxoplasmosis with ELISA and Rapid Diagnostic Test among Residents in Gyodong-do, Inchon city, Korea: A Four-Year Follow-up
    Yeong Hoon Kim, Ji hoo Lee, Seong kyu Ahn, Tong-Soo Kim, Sung-Jong Hong, Chom-Kyu Chong, Hye-Jin Ahn, Ho-Woo Nam
    The Korean Journal of Parasitology.2017; 55(3): 247.     CrossRef
  • A Disease Around the Corner
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2016; 7(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • WITHDRAWN: A disease around the corner
    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Prospects for dengue vaccines for travelers
    Sl-Ki Lim, Yong Seok Lee, Suk Namkung, Jacqueline K Lim, In-Kyu Yoon
    Clinical and Experimental Vaccine Research.2016; 5(2): 89.     CrossRef
Comparison of Four Serological Tests for Detecting Antibodies to Japanese Encephalitis Virus after Vaccination in Children
Go Woon Cha, Jung Eun Cho, Young Ran Ju, Young-Jin Hong, Myung Guk Han, Won-Ja Lee, Eui Yul Choi, Young Eui Jeong
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(5):286-291.   Published online October 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.08.003
  • 2,184 View
  • 20 Download
  • 13 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Several different methods are currently used to detect antibodies to Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) in serum samples or cerebrospinal fluid. These methods include the plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT), the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test, indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA), and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of each method in detecting vaccine-induced antibodies to JEV.
Methods
The study included 29 children who had completed a primary immunization schedule with an inactivated vaccine against JEV derived from mouse brain (n = 15) or a live attenuated SA14-14-2 vaccine (n = 14). Serum samples were collected between 3 months and 47 months after the last immunization. The serum samples were tested by performing the PRNT, HI test, in-house IFA, and commercial ELISA. The antibody detection rates were compared between tests.
Results
All 29 serum samples were positive with the PRNT, showing antibody titers from 1:20 to 1:2560. The HI test showed positive rates of 86.7% (13/15) and 71.4% (10/14) in the inactivated and live attenuated vaccine groups, respectively. The results of the IFA for immunoglobulin (Ig)G were positive in 53.3% (8/15) of children in the inactivated vaccine group and 35.7% (5/14) in the live attenuated vaccine group. Neither the IFA nor ELISA detected JEV IgM antibodies in any of the 29 children.
Conclusion
These results show that detection rates of vaccine-induced antibodies to JEV have a wide range (0–100%) depending on the testing method as well as the time since immunization and individual differences between children. These findings are helpful in interpreting serological test results for the diagnosis of Japanese encephalitis in situations where vaccines are widely administered.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A review on Japanese Encephalitis virus emergence, pathogenesis and detection: From conventional diagnostics to emerging rapid detection techniques
    Fatima Mohsin, Shariq Suleman, Nigar Anzar, Jagriti Narang, Shikha Wadhwa
    International Journal of Biological Macromolecules.2022; 217: 435.     CrossRef
  • Recent pharmaceutical engineered trends as theranostics for Japanese encephalitis
    Akshada Mhaske, Sanjiv Singh, Mohammed A.S. Abourehab, Akhilesh Kumar, Prashant Kesharwani, Rahul Shukla
    Process Biochemistry.2022; 122: 115.     CrossRef
  • In silico molecular docking in DNA aptamer development
    Tholasi Nadhan Navien, Ramesh Thevendran, Hazrina Yusof Hamdani, Thean-Hock Tang, Marimuthu Citartan
    Biochimie.2021; 180: 54.     CrossRef
  • Pathobiology of Japanese encephalitis virus infection
    Kiran Bala Sharma, Sudhanshu Vrati, Manjula Kalia
    Molecular Aspects of Medicine.2021; 81: 100994.     CrossRef
  • JEV-nanobarcode and colorimetric reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (cRT-LAMP)
    Gna Ahn, Se Hee Lee, Min-Suk Song, Beom-Ku Han, Yang-Hoon Kim, Ji-Young Ahn
    Microchimica Acta.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Review of Emerging Japanese Encephalitis Virus: New Aspects and Concepts about Entry into the Brain and Inter-Cellular Spreading
    Filgueira, Lannes
    Pathogens.2019; 8(3): 111.     CrossRef
  • Seroprevalence of Dengue Virus Antibody in Korea
    Ji Hyen Lee, Han Wool Kim, Kyung-Hyo Kim
    Pediatric Infection & Vaccine.2018; 25(3): 132.     CrossRef
  • Japanese Encephalitis: A Brief Review on Indian Perspectives
    Reshma Kulkarni, Gajanan N. Sapkal, Himanshu Kaushal, Devendra T. Mourya
    The Open Virology Journal.2018; 12(1): 121.     CrossRef
  • Clinical Characteristics of Severe Japanese Encephalitis: A Case Series from South Korea
    Kyung-Il Park, Manho Kim, Jun-Sang Sunwoo, Ki-Young Jung, Kon Chu, Keun-Hwa Jung, Sang Kun Lee, Soon-Tae Lee, Jangsup Moon
    The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygi.2017; 97(2): 369.     CrossRef
  • JAPANESE ENCEPHALITIS, RECENT PERSPECTIVES ON VIRUS GENOME, TRANSMISSION, EPIDEMIOLOGY, DIAGNOSIS AND PROPHYLACTIC INTERVENTIONS
    Arumugam Karthikeyan, Subramaniyan Shanmuganathan, Selvaraj Pavulraj, Govinthasamy Prabakar, Selvaraj Pavithra, Kannan Porteen, Govindaraj Elaiyaraja, Yashpal Singh Malik
    Journal of Experimental Biology and Agricultural S.2017; 5(6): 730.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of Neutralizing Antibodies to Japanese Encephalitis Virus among High-Risk Age Groups in South Korea, 2010
    Eun Ju Lee, Go-Woon Cha, Young Ran Ju, Myung Guk Han, Won-Ja Lee, Young Eui Jeong, Nagendra R Hegde
    PLOS ONE.2016; 11(1): e0147841.     CrossRef
  • A Novel Immunochromatographic Test Applied to a Serological Survey of Japanese Encephalitis Virus on Pig Farms in Korea
    Go-Woon Cha, Eun Ju Lee, Eun-Joo Lim, Kang Suk Sin, Woo Won Park, Doo Young Jeon, Myung Guk Han, Won-Ja Lee, Woo-Young Choi, Young Eui Jeong, Lark L. Coffey
    PLOS ONE.2015; 10(5): e0127313.     CrossRef
  • Silent Circulation of Ross River Virus in French Polynesia
    Maite Aubry, Jérôme Finke, Anita Teissier, Claudine Roche, Julien Broult, Sylvie Paulous, Philippe Desprès, Van-Mai Cao-Lormeau, Didier Musso
    International Journal of Infectious Diseases.2015; 37: 19.     CrossRef
Travel-Associated Chikungunya Cases in South Korea during 2009–2010
Go Woon Cha, Jung Eun Cho, Eun Ju Lee, Young Ran Ju, Myung Guk Han, Chan Park, Young Eui Jeong
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2013;4(3):170-175.   Published online June 30, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.04.008
  • 1,980 View
  • 12 Download
  • 10 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Chikungunya (CHIK) has been classified as a communicable disease group IV in South Korea since late 2010. Based on this, we investigated the extent of imported cases of CHIK in dengue-suspected individuals returning from dengue-endemic regions.
Methods
A total of 486 dengue-suspected serum samples were screened for CHIK by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. Further RT-PCR-positive samples were used for the viral culture, and CHIK was subsequently confirmed by sequence analysis of the culture samples.
Results
Five out of 107 dengue-positive samples were found to be positive for CHIK and 15 out of 379 dengue-negative samples were found to be positive for CHIK by immunoglobulin M ELISA. Further, a CHIK virus was isolated from one of the two RT-PCR-positive sera by cell culture and confirmed by sequence analysis.
Conclusion
The present study documents the first evidence of travel-associated CHIK infection in South Korea. Considering the intense international traffic between countries, our finding emphasizes the urgent need for active patient and vector surveillance for timely response to reduce the introduction of CHIK in Korea.

Citations

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  • Global prevalence of dengue and chikungunya coinfection: A systematic review and meta-analysis of 43,341 participants
    Ahmad Adebayo Irekeola, E.A. R Engku Nur Syafirah, Md Asiful Islam, Rafidah Hanim Shueb
    Acta Tropica.2022; 231: 106408.     CrossRef
  • Current Status and a Perspective of Mosquito-Borne Diseases in the Republic of Korea
    Jae Hyoung Im, Tong-Soo Kim, Moon-Hyun Chung, Ji Hyeon Baek, Hea Yoon Kwon, Jin-Soo Lee
    Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases.2021; 21(2): 69.     CrossRef
  • Implications of a travel connectivity-based approach for infectious disease transmission risks in Oceania
    Angela Cadavid Restrepo, Luis Furuya-Kanamori, Helen Mayfield, Eric Nilles, Colleen L Lau
    BMJ Open.2021; 11(8): e046206.     CrossRef
  • Development of a neutralization assay based on the pseudotyped chikungunya virus of a Korean isolate
    Woo-Chang Chung, Kwang Yeon Hwang, Suk-Jo Kang, Jae-Ouk Kim, Moon Jung Song
    Journal of Microbiology.2020; 58(1): 46.     CrossRef
  • Chikungunya virus infection in Indonesia: a systematic review and evolutionary analysis
    Harapan Harapan, Alice Michie, Mudatsir Mudatsir, Roy Nusa, Benediktus Yohan, Abram Luther Wagner, R. Tedjo Sasmono, Allison Imrie
    BMC Infectious Diseases.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Global prevalence and distribution of coinfection of malaria, dengue and chikungunya: a systematic review
    Nasir Salam, Shoeb Mustafa, Abdul Hafiz, Anis Ahmad Chaudhary, Farah Deeba, Shama Parveen
    BMC Public Health.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Chikungunya Virus Infection after Traveling to Surinam, South America
    Hoe-Soo Jang, Jong-Hun Chung, Joa Kim, Sun Ae Han, Na-Ra Yun, Dong-Min Kim
    The Korean Journal of Medicine.2016; 90(3): 262.     CrossRef
  • Molecular epidemiology, evolution and phylogeny of Chikungunya virus: An updating review
    Alessandra Lo Presti, Eleonora Cella, Silvia Angeletti, Massimo Ciccozzi
    Infection, Genetics and Evolution.2016; 41: 270.     CrossRef
  • The First Imported Case Infected with Chikungunya Virus in Korea
    Jeong-Hwan Hwang, Chang-Seop Lee
    Infection & Chemotherapy.2015; 47(1): 55.     CrossRef
  • Zika virus in Brazil and the danger of infestation by Aedes (Stegomyia) mosquitoes
    Carlos Brisola Marcondes, Maria de Fátima Freire de Melo Ximenes
    Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropic.2015; 49(1): 4.     CrossRef
Epidemiologic Features of Animal Bite Cases Occurring in Rabies-Endemic Areas of Korea, 2005 to 2009
Myung Guk Han, Ryou Jung Sang, Young Eui Jeong, Young Ran Ju, Jung Eun Cho, Jun-Sun Park
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2012;3(1):14-18.   Published online December 31, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2012.01.002
  • 1,927 View
  • 12 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Human rabies is a reemerging infectious disease in Korea. There was no human rabies case for 14 years until the disease had reoccurred in 1999. To prevent occurrence of human rabies, surveillance for animal bite patients in rabies endemic areas in Korea was conducted since 2005 as a part of a human rabies control program. The animal bite cases were analyzed to determine whether patients were treated according to the post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) guideline of the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Methods
Information of animal bite cases that occurred from 2005 to 2009 in rabies high-risk regions were collected by cooperation with Regional Public Health Centers in 18 cities/districts of rabies endemic areas.
Results
A total of 2458 animal bite cases were reported. Dogs accounted for 86% of animal bites and 67% of the animals were not vaccinated against rabies virus. For PEP, among rabies-vaccinated animals, 92.7% were observed for clinical signs and 1.4% underwent necropsy. Among unvaccinated animals, 72.7% were observed for clinical signs and 4.1% underwent necropsy. The remaining animals were not available for examination. Of the animal bite patients, 32.5% received PEP and 51.6% were treated by first aid or by washing the wound.
Conclusions
Given that no human rabies cases were reported since 2005 and animal rabies was continuously reported in endemic areas of Korea, the human rabies control program implemented in 2005 appears to have a significant role in the prevention and control of human rabies.

Citations

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  • Forecasting delay times in post-exposure prophylaxis to human animal bite injuries in Central Iran: A decision tree analysis
    Amir Hamta, Abedin Saghafipour, Seyed Abbas Hosseinalipour, Fatemeh Rezaei
    Veterinary World.2019; 12(7): 965.     CrossRef
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    N. S. De Paula, E. A. Saraiva, I. M. Araújo, K. K. G. Nascimento, D. A. Xavier, K. S. Santos, E. M. N. Abreu, R. J. P. S. Guimãraes, I. Abel
    Zoonoses and Public Health.2018; 65(4): 395.     CrossRef
Serum MicroRNA Expression Profiling in Mice Infected with Rabies Virus
Myung Guk Han, Jun-Sun Park, Cho Soon Lee, Young Eui Jeong, Jung Sang Ryou, Jung Eun Cho, Young Ran Ju, Kyoung-Ki Lee
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2011;2(3):186-191.   Published online December 31, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2011.11.043
  • 2,066 View
  • 18 Download
  • 6 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Serum or plasma microRNAs (miRNAs) are potential biomarkers for the diagnosis for cancer and prenatal diseases. This study was conducted to investigate whether rabies virus causes a change in serum miRNA expression.
Methods
ICR mice were intramuscularly inoculated with rabies virus and were sacrificed weekly to collect serum and brain tissue for 4 weeks postinoculation. Mice were assigned to four groups based on the results of indirect immunofluorescent assays, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and nested reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and the expression profiles of serum miRNAs were compared using a commercial mouse miRNA expression profiling assay.
Results
The expression levels of miRNAs changed significantly with the different stages of the disease. The expression level of 94 serum miRNAs in infected mice changed at least twofold. Seven microRNAs of them were significantly upregulated or downregulated in all infected mice regardless of disease status. The number of miRNAs with an expression level change decreased with the progression of the disease. In a hierarchical cluster analysis, infected mice clustered into a group separate from uninfected control mice.
Conclusions
Based on the relationship of miRNAs to gene expression regulation, miRNAs may be candidates for the study of viral pathogenesis and could have potential as biomarkers.

Citations

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  • Expression Profiling and Bioinformatics Analysis of CircRNA in Mice Brain Infected with Rabies Virus
    Wen Zhao, Jingyin Su, Ningning Wang, Naiyu Zhao, Shuo Su
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2021; 22(12): 6537.     CrossRef
  • Altered microRNA expression in COVID-19 patients enables identification of SARS-CoV-2 infection
    Ryan J. Farr, Christina L. Rootes, Louise C. Rowntree, Thi H. O. Nguyen, Luca Hensen, Lukasz Kedzierski, Allen C. Cheng, Katherine Kedzierska, Gough G. Au, Glenn A. Marsh, Seshadri S. Vasan, Chwan Hong Foo, Christopher Cowled, Cameron R. Stewart, Ron A. M
    PLOS Pathogens.2021; 17(7): e1009759.     CrossRef
  • Machine Learning Identifies Cellular and Exosomal MicroRNA Signatures of Lyssavirus Infection in Human Stem Cell-Derived Neurons
    Ryan J. Farr, Nathan Godde, Christopher Cowled, Vinod Sundaramoorthy, Diane Green, Cameron Stewart, John Bingham, Carmel M. O’Brien, Megan Dearnley
    Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • MicroRNA Biomarkers for Infectious Diseases: From Basic Research to Biosensing
    Leon Tribolet, Emily Kerr, Christopher Cowled, Andrew G. D. Bean, Cameron R. Stewart, Megan Dearnley, Ryan J. Farr
    Frontiers in Microbiology.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Circulating microRNA profiles of Hendra virus infection in horses
    Christopher Cowled, Chwan-Hong Foo, Celine Deffrasnes, Christina L. Rootes, David T. Williams, Deborah Middleton, Lin-Fa Wang, Andrew G. D. Bean, Cameron R. Stewart
    Scientific Reports.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Systems Biomedicine of Rabies Delineates the Affected Signaling Pathways
    Sadegh Azimzadeh Jamalkandi, Sayed-Hamidreza Mozhgani, Hamid Gholami Pourbadie, Mehdi Mirzaie, Farshid Noorbakhsh, Behrouz Vaziri, Alireza Gholami, Naser Ansari-Pour, Mohieddin Jafari
    Frontiers in Microbiology.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
Identification of Dengue Type 1 Virus (DENV-1) in Koreans Traveling Abroad
Young Eui Jeong, Yeon Hee Kim, Jung Eun Cho, Myung Guk Han, Young Ran Ju
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2011;2(1):34-40.   Published online June 30, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2011.04.002
  • 1,853 View
  • 14 Download
  • 15 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
To date, no indigenous dengue virus (DENV) transmissions have been reported in Korea. However, imported dengue infections have been diagnosed in travelers returning from endemic areas. This study presents the first virological evidence of travel-associated DENV importation into South Korea.
Methods
From January 2004 to June 2006, a total of 278 serum samples from 245 patients with suspected dengue fever were tested using the Panbio Dengue Duo IgM/IgG Rapid Strip Test. We selected 11 of the early symptomatic-phase sera that were negative for IgM and retrospectively studied them by virus isolation and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.
Results
All 11 serum samples were found to be DENV positive by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and viruses were successfully isolated from seven of the 11 serum samples. All the isolates were identified as DENV serotype-1.
Conclusion
We successfully isolated seven DENV serotype-1 strains for the first time in South Korea from imported infections. Considering that the vector mosquito, Aedes albopictus, already exists in South Korea, we propose that a vector surveillance program for dengue is urgently needed.

Citations

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  • Genotypic persistence of dengue virus in the Philippines
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    Ji Hyen Lee, Han Wool Kim, Kyung-Hyo Kim
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    Shetty Pooja, Sasidharanpillai Sabeena, Bhaskar Revti, Ramachandran Sanjay, Aithal Anjali, Kumar Rajendra, Sushama Aswathyraj, Dsouza Giselle, Maity Hindol, Govindakarnavar Arunkumar
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    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2016; 7(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of Neutralizing Antibodies to Japanese Encephalitis Virus among High-Risk Age Groups in South Korea, 2010
    Eun Ju Lee, Go-Woon Cha, Young Ran Ju, Myung Guk Han, Won-Ja Lee, Young Eui Jeong, Nagendra R Hegde
    PLOS ONE.2016; 11(1): e0147841.     CrossRef
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    Changhwan Lee, Eun Jung Jang, Donghyok Kwon, Heun Choi, Jung Wan Park, Geun-Ryang Bae
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    Yun Young Go, R. P. V. Jayanthe Rajapakse, Senanayake A. M. Kularatne, Pei-Yu Alison Lee, Keun Bon Ku, Sangwoo Nam, Pin-Hsing Chou, Yun-Long Tsai, Yu-Lun Liu, Hsiao-Fen Grace Chang, Hwa-Tang Thomas Wang, Udeni B. R. Balasuriya, M. J. Loeffelholz
    Journal of Clinical Microbiology.2016; 54(6): 1528.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of the Epidemiological Aspects of Imported Dengue Cases between Korea and Japan, 2006–2010
    Young Eui Jeong, Won-Chang Lee, Jung Eun Cho, Myung-Guk Han, Won-Ja Lee
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2016; 7(1): 71.     CrossRef
  • Complete Genome Sequences of Three Clinical Isolates of Dengue Virus Serotype 1 from South Korean Travelers
    Yun Young Go, Eunhye Jung, Young Eui Jeong, Udeni B. R. Balasuriya
    Genome Announcements.2015;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Comparison of Four Serological Tests for Detecting Antibodies to Japanese Encephalitis Virus after Vaccination in Children
    Go Woon Cha, Jung Eun Cho, Young Ran Ju, Young-Jin Hong, Myung Guk Han, Won-Ja Lee, Eui Yul Choi, Young Eui Jeong
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2014; 5(5): 286.     CrossRef
  • Dengue virus type 1 clade replacement in recurring homotypic outbreaks
    Boon-Teong Teoh, Sing-Sin Sam, Kim-Kee Tan, Jefree Johari, Meng-Hooi Shu, Mohammed Bashar Danlami, Juraina Abd-Jamil, NorAziyah MatRahim, Nor Muhammad Mahadi, Sazaly AbuBakar
    BMC Evolutionary Biology.2013;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Travel-Associated Chikungunya Cases in South Korea during 2009–2010
    Go Woon Cha, Jung Eun Cho, Eun Ju Lee, Young Ran Ju, Myung Guk Han, Chan Park, Young Eui Jeong
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2013; 4(3): 170.     CrossRef
  • The Road Less Traveled
    Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2011; 2(1): 1.     CrossRef

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives