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Donghyok Kwon 5 Articles
Review of the early reports of the epidemiological characteristics of the B.1.1.7 variant of SARS-CoV-2 and its spread worldwide
Yeonju Kim, Eun-Jin Kim, Sang-Won Lee, Donghyok Kwon
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(3):139-148.   Published online June 24, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.0037
  • 4,068 View
  • 137 Download
  • 7 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
The variant B.1.1.7 of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the RNA virus causing the pandemic more than a year worldwide, was reported from United Kingdom (UK) in late December 2020. It was reported that mortality increases by 65% and transmissibility increases by 70%, which may result in an increase of reproduction number to 1.13−1.55 from 0.75−0.85. To analyze the global increasing trend of the variant B.1.1.7, we extracted results of B.1.1.7 from GISAID on May 11 and May 12, 2021, and conducted a doseresponse regression. It took 47 days to reach 20% and 121 days to reach 50% among the sequence submitted from UK. In Korea, cases of B.1.1.7 have increased since the first report of three cases on December 28, 2020. Positive rate of B.1.1.7 in Korea was 21.6% in the week from May 9 to May 15, 2021. Detection rate of the variants is expected to increase further and new variants of SARS-CoV-2 are emerging, so a close monitoring and control would be maintained for months.

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Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Mutations in SARS-CoV-2: Insights on structure, variants, vaccines, and biomedical interventions
    Ahmed I. Abulsoud, Hussein M. El-Husseiny, Ahmed A. El-Husseiny, Hesham A. El-Mahdy, Ahmed Ismail, Samy Y. Elkhawaga, Emad Gamil Khidr, Doaa Fathi, Eman A. Mady, Agnieszka Najda, Mohammad Algahtani, Abdulrahman Theyab, Khalaf F. Alsharif, Ashraf Albrakati
    Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy.2023; 157: 113977.     CrossRef
  • Incidence Evaluation of SARS-CoV-2 Variants in the Ulsan Area, Korea, Using PowerChek SARS-CoV-2 S-gene Mutation Detection Kit: A Pilot Study
    Sang Hyuk Park, Hyun-Ki Kim, Hang Kang, Jung Heon Kim, Jaeseung Lee, Ji-Hun Lim, Seon-Ho Lee, Joseph Jeong
    Annals of Laboratory Medicine.2022; 42(3): 363.     CrossRef
  • Biological Properties of SARS-CoV-2 Variants: Epidemiological Impact and Clinical Consequences
    Reem Hoteit, Hadi M. Yassine
    Vaccines.2022; 10(6): 919.     CrossRef
  • Virtual recruitment and participant engagement for substance use research during a pandemic
    Carolin C. Hoeflich, Anna Wang, Ayodeji Otufowora, Linda B. Cottler, Catherine W. Striley
    Current Opinion in Psychiatry.2022; 35(4): 252.     CrossRef
  • Display of receptor-binding domain of SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein variants on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell surface
    Hongguan Xing, Liyan Zhu, Pingping Wang, Guoping Zhao, Zhihua Zhou, Yi Yang, Hong Zou, Xing Yan
    Frontiers in Immunology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Mutations in SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid in variants of concern impair the sensitivity of SARS-CoV-2 detection by rapid antigen tests
    Ibrahim T. Hagag, Krzysztof Pyrc, Saskia Weber, Anne Balkema-Buschmann, Martin H. Groschup, Markus Keller
    Frontiers in Virology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Disease Severity and Clinical Outcomes of the SARS-CoV-2 Variants of Concern
    Lixin Lin, Ying Liu, Xiujuan Tang, Daihai He
    Frontiers in Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Genomic Surveillance of SARS-CoV-2: Distribution of Clades in the Republic of Korea in 2020
Ae Kyung Park, Il-Hwan Kim, Junyoung Kim, Jeong-Min Kim, Heui Man Kim, Chae young Lee, Myung-Guk Han, Gi-Eun Rhie, Donghyok Kwon, Jeong-Gu Nam, Young-Joon Park, Jin Gwack, Nam-Joo Lee, SangHee Woo, Jin Sun No, Jaehee Lee, Jeemin Ha, JeeEun Rhee, Cheon-Kwon Yoo, Eun-Jin Kim
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2021;12(1):37-43.   Published online February 23, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2021.12.1.06
  • 4,743 View
  • 187 Download
  • 16 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF

Since a novel beta-coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) was first reported in December 2019, there has been a rapid global spread of the virus. Genomic surveillance was conducted on samples isolated from infected individuals to monitor the spread of genetic variants of SARS-CoV-2 in Korea. The Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency performed whole genome sequencing of SARS-CoV-2 in Korea for 1 year (January 2020 to January 2021). A total of 2,488 SARS-CoV-2 cases were sequenced (including 648 cases from abroad). Initially, the prevalent clades of SARS-CoV-2 were the S and V clades, however, by March 2020, GH clade was the most dominant. Only international travelers were identified as having G or GR clades, and since the first variant 501Y.V1 was identified (from a traveler from the United Kingdom on December 22nd, 2020), a total of 27 variants of 501Y.V1, 501Y.V2, and 484K.V2 have been classified (as of January 25th, 2021). The results in this study indicated that quarantining of travelers entering Korea successfully prevented dissemination of the SARS-CoV-2 variants in Korea.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Rapid Emergence of the Omicron Variant of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 in Korea
    Ae Kyung Park, Il-Hwan Kim, Chae Young Lee, Jeong-Ah Kim, Hyeokjin Lee, Heui Man Kim, Nam-Joo Lee, SangHee Woo, Jaehee Lee, JeeEun Rhee, Cheon-Kwon Yoo, Eun-Jin Kim
    Annals of Laboratory Medicine.2023; 43(2): 211.     CrossRef
  • Genomic evidence of SARS‐CoV‐2 reinfection in the Republic of Korea
    Ae Kyung Park, Jee Eun Rhee, Il‐Hwan Kim, Heui Man Kim, Hyeokjin Lee, Jeong‐Ah Kim, Chae Young Lee, Nam‐Joo Lee, SangHee Woo, Jaehee Lee, Jin Sun No, Gi‐Eun Rhie, Seong Jin Wang, Sang‐Eun Lee, Young Joon Park, Gemma Park, Jung Yeon Kim, Jin Gwack, Cheon‐K
    Journal of Medical Virology.2022; 94(4): 1717.     CrossRef
  • SARS-CoV-2 B.1.619 and B.1.620 Lineages, South Korea, 2021
    Ae Kyung Park, Il-Hwan Kim, Heui Man Kim, Hyeokjin Lee, Nam-Joo Lee, Jeong-Ah Kim, SangHee Woo, Chae young Lee, Jaehee Lee, Sae Jin Oh, JeeEun Rhee, Cheon-Kwon Yoo, Eun-Jin Kim
    Emerging Infectious Diseases.2022; 28(2): 415.     CrossRef
  • Humoral and Cellular Responses to COVID-19 Vaccines in SARS-CoV-2 Infection-Naïve and -Recovered Korean Individuals
    Ji-Young Hwang, Yunhwa Kim, Kyung-Min Lee, Eun-Jeong Jang, Chang-Hoon Woo, Chang-Ui Hong, Seok-Tae Choi, Sivilay Xayaheuang, Jong-Geol Jang, June-Hong Ahn, Hosun Park
    Vaccines.2022; 10(2): 332.     CrossRef
  • Increase in Viral Load in Patients With SARS-CoV-2 Delta Variant Infection in the Republic of Korea
    Jeong-Min Kim, Jee Eun Rhee, Myeongsu Yoo, Heui Man Kim, Nam-Joo Lee, Sang Hee Woo, Hye-Jun Jo, Donghyok Kwon, Sangwon Lee, Cheon Kwon Yoo, Eun-Jin Kim
    Frontiers in Microbiology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Molecular Dynamics Studies on the Structural Stability Prediction of SARS-CoV-2 Variants Including Multiple Mutants
    Kwang-Eun Choi, Jeong-Min Kim, Jee Eun Rhee, Ae Kyung Park, Eun-Jin Kim, Cheon Kwon Yoo, Nam Sook Kang
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2022; 23(9): 4956.     CrossRef
  • SARS-CoV-2 shedding dynamics and transmission in immunosuppressed patients
    Jee-Soo Lee, Ki Wook Yun, Hyeonju Jeong, Boram Kim, Man Jin Kim, Jae Hyeon Park, Ho Seob Shin, Hyeon Sae Oh, Hobin Sung, Myung Gi Song, Sung Im Cho, So Yeon Kim, Chang Kyung Kang, Pyoeng Gyun Choe, Wan Beom Park, Nam Joong Kim, Myoung-Don Oh, Eun Hwa Choi
    Virulence.2022; 13(1): 1242.     CrossRef
  • Immunological and Pathological Peculiarity of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 Beta Variant
    Sunhee Lee, Gun Young Yoon, Su Jin Lee, Young-Chan Kwon, Hyun Woo Moon, Yu-Jin Kim, Haesoo Kim, Wooseong Lee, Gi Uk Jeong, Chonsaeng Kim, Kyun-Do Kim, Seong-Jun Kim, Dae-Gyun Ahn, Miguel Angel Martinez
    Microbiology Spectrum.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Clinical scoring system to predict viable viral shedding in patients with COVID-19
    Sung Woon Kang, Heedo Park, Ji Yeun Kim, Sunghee Park, So Yun Lim, Sohyun Lee, Joon-Yong Bae, Jeonghun Kim, Seongman Bae, Jiwon Jung, Min Jae Kim, Yong Pil Chong, Sang-Oh Lee, Sang-Ho Choi, Yang Soo Kim, Sung-Cheol Yun, Man-Seong Park, Sung-Han Kim
    Journal of Clinical Virology.2022; 157: 105319.     CrossRef
  • Model-informed COVID-19 exit strategy with projections of SARS-CoV-2 infections generated by variants in the Republic of Korea
    Sung-mok Jung, Kyungmin Huh, Munkhzul Radnaabaatar, Jaehun Jung
    BMC Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Comparative analysis of mutational hotspots in the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 isolates from different geographic origins
    Sanghoo Lee, Mi-Kyeong Lee, Hyeongkyun Na, Jinwoo Ahn, Gayeon Hong, Youngkee Lee, Jimyeong Park, Yejin Kim, Yun-Tae Kim, Chang-Ki Kim, Hwan-Sub Lim, Kyoung-Ryul Lee
    Gene Reports.2021; 23: 101100.     CrossRef
  • Review of Current COVID-19 Diagnostics and Opportunities for Further Development
    Yan Mardian, Herman Kosasih, Muhammad Karyana, Aaron Neal, Chuen-Yen Lau
    Frontiers in Medicine.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Locally harvested Covid-19 convalescent plasma could probably help combat the geographically determined SARS-CoV-2 viral variants
    Manish Raturi, Anuradha Kusum, Mansi Kala, Garima Mittal, Anita Sharma, Naveen Bansal
    Transfusion Clinique et Biologique.2021; 28(3): 300.     CrossRef
  • Molecular Dynamics Studies on the Structural Characteristics for the Stability Prediction of SARS-CoV-2
    Kwang-Eun Choi, Jeong-Min Kim, JeeEun Rhee, Ae Kyung Park, Eun-Jin Kim, Nam Sook Kang
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2021; 22(16): 8714.     CrossRef
  • Management following the first confirmed case of SARS-CoV-2 in a domestic cat associated with a massive outbreak in South Korea
    Taewon Han, Boyeong Ryu, Suyeon Lee, Yugyeong Song, Yoongje Jeong, Ilhwan Kim, Jeongmin Kim, Eunjin Kim, Wonjun Lee, Hyunju Lee, Haekyoung Hwang
    One Health.2021; 13: 100328.     CrossRef
  • Genomic epidemiology reveals the reduction of the introduction and spread of SARS-CoV-2 after implementing control strategies in Republic of Korea, 2020
    Jung-Hoon Kwon, Jeong-Min Kim, Dong-hun Lee, Ae Kyung Park, Il-Hwan Kim, Da-Won Kim, Ji-Yun Kim, Noori Lim, Kyeong-Yeon Cho, Heui Man Kim, Nam-Joo Lee, SangHee Woo, Chae Young Lee, Jin Sun No, Junyoung Kim, JeeEun Rhee, Myung-Guk Han, Gi-Eun Rhie, Cheon K
    Virus Evolution.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Imported Melioidosis in South Korea: A Case Series with a Literature Review
Seung Woo Kim, Geun-Yong Kwon, Bongyoung Kim, Donghyok Kwon, Jaeseung Shin, Geun-Ryang Bae
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2015;6(6):363-368.   Published online December 31, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2015.10.014
  • 1,866 View
  • 17 Download
  • 10 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Melioidosis is a potentially fatal infectious disease caused by the environmental anaerobic Gram-negative bacillus Burkholderia pseudomallei. Melioidosis is endemic to areas of northern Australia and Southeast Asia. With increasing international travel and migration, imported cases of melioidosis are being reported regularly. Here, we summarize the 11 cases of melioidosis reported in South Korea from 2003 to 2014.
Methods
Tracing epidemiological investigations were performed on every patient reported to the National Surveillance System since 2011. A systematic literature search was performed to identify melioidosis cases that occurred prior to 2011.
Results
The overall fatality rate was 36.4%. All the patients had visited Southeast Asia where melioidosis is endemic. The stay in the endemic region ranged from 4 days to 20 years. Of the seven patients who developed initial symptoms after returning to South Korea, the time interval between returning to South Korea and symptom onset ranged from 1 day to 3 years. The remaining four patients developed symptoms during their stay in the endemic region and were diagnosed with melioidosis in South Korea. Seven (63.6%) patients possessed at least one risk factor, all of whom were diabetic. Pneumonia was the most frequent clinical manifestation, but the patients showed a wide spectrum of clinical features, including internal organ abscesses, a mycotic aneurysm of the aorta, and coinfection with tuberculosis.
Conclusion
An early diagnosis and initiation of the appropriate antibiotics can reduce the mortality of melioidosis. Consequently, increased awareness of the risk factors and clinical features of melioidosis is required.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Cox model of predicting mortality among melioidosis patients in Northern Malaysia
    Kamaruddin Mardhiah, Nadiah Wan-Arfah, Nyi Nyi Naing, Muhammad Radzi Abu Hassan, Huan-Keat Chan
    Medicine.2021; 100(25): e26160.     CrossRef
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    Seow Yen Tan
    Case Reports in Infectious Diseases.2020; 2020: 1.     CrossRef
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    Chee-Hoo Yip, Ahmad-Kamal Ghazali, Sheila Nathan
    Biochemical Society Transactions.2020; 48(2): 569.     CrossRef
  • Mycotic aneurysm secondary to melioidosis in China: A series of eight cases and a review of literature
    Hua Wu, Xuming Wang, Xiaojun Zhou, Zhicheng Wu, Yanyan Wang, Mengjie Pan, Binghuai Lu, Susanna Jane Dunachie
    PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.2020; 14(8): e0008525.     CrossRef
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    Hua Wu, Dongliang Huang, Biao Wu, Mengjie Pan, Binghuai Lu
    BMC Infectious Diseases.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Peter San Martin, Joseph Chua, Ralph Bautista, Jennifer Nailes, Mario Panaligan, David Dance
    Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease.2018; 3(3): 99.     CrossRef
  • Clinical and Imaging Findings of Musculoskeletal Melioidosis in the Right Hip: A Case Report
    Myung Hyun Kim, Tong Jin Chun
    Journal of the Korean Society of Radiology.2018; 78(3): 212.     CrossRef
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    Yong-Woo Shin, Myung-Min Choi, Jeong-Hoon Chun, Jae-Yon Yu, Dae-Won Kim, Gi-eun Rhie
    Genome Announcements.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology.2017; 38(7): 886.     CrossRef
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    Mohammad R. Mohd Ali, Amira W. Mohamad Safiee, Padmaloseni Thangarajah, Mohd H. Fauzi, Alwi Muhd Besari, Nabilah Ismail, Chan Yean Yean
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Development of a Specific and Rapid Diagnostic Method for Detecting Influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 Virus Infection Using Immunochromatographic Assay
Mi Jung Ji, Byung Ki Cho, Young Shik Cho, Young Jin Choi, Donghyok Kwon, Kyeongcheol Shin, Joo-Yeon Lee, Chun Kang, Byoung Su Yoon
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2013;4(6):342-346.   Published online December 31, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.10.006
  • 1,916 View
  • 13 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The aim of this study was to develop an immunochromatographic assay (ICA) for the detection of influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 virus infection. Materials and methods Several monoclonal antibodies against influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 virus were generated and an ICA (pdm09-ICA) was developed for the rapid and specific detection of influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 virus infection. The specificity and sensitivity of the developed assay were compared with that of hemagglutination assay and real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR).
Results
The detection limit was estimated to be 1/2 (8) hemagglutinating unit; the sensitivity and specificity rates of pdm09-ICA were 75.86% (110/145) and 100% (43/43), respectively, compared with rRT-PCR. The cross-reactivity for 20 influenza viruses, including seasonal H1N1 viruses, was found to be negative except for the H1N1 virus (A/Swine/Korea/GC0503/2005).
Conclusion
These results indicate that the proposed method can be easily used for rapid and specific detection of the pdm09 infection. The assay developed in this study would be a useful tool for distinguishing the pdm09 infection from seasonal influenza A and B infections.

Citations

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  • Sensitive detection of influenza a virus based on a CdSe/CdS/ZnS quantum dot-linked rapid fluorescent immunochromatographic test
    Anh Viet Thi Nguyen, Tung Duy Dao, Tien Thi Thuy Trinh, Du-Young Choi, Seung-Taek Yu, Hyun Park, Seon-Ju Yeo
    Biosensors and Bioelectronics.2020; 155: 112090.     CrossRef
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    Viroj Wiwanitkit
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2014; 5(2): 115.     CrossRef
Pathogenesis and Chronologic Localization of the Human Influenza A (H1N1) Virus in Cotton Rats
Donghyok Kwon, Kyeongcheol Shin, Jin-Young Shin, Joo-Yeon Lee, Yooncheol Ha, Nam-Joo Lee, Hee-Bok Oh, Chanhee Chae, Chun Kang
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2011;2(1):15-22.   Published online June 30, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2011.04.005
  • 1,933 View
  • 22 Download
  • 7 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
We aimed to evaluate the pathogenesis and chronologic localization of human influenza A (H1N1) virus in experimentally infected cotton rats.
Methods
The animals were intranasally inoculated with 107 plaque-forming units of A/Solomon Islands/3/2006 (H1N1) influenza virus and evaluated for pathogenicity for a period of 28 days. Virus replication kinetics and pathological properties were assessed chronologically. Acute antiviral responses were evaluated by mean of real-time polymerase chain reaction.
Results
Cotton rats infected with A/Solomon Islands/3/2006 virus lost weight until 6 days post-inoculation (DPI) and showed decreased activity until 3 DPI. At necropsy, focal areas of redness and consolidation of lungs were evident at 1, 2, and 3 DPI. Lung histopathology showed moderate to severe interstitial pneumonia, alveolitis and bronchiolitis. Influenza A specific viral protein was detected in bronchiolar epithelial cells, alveolar septa and pneumocytes. Influenza viruses were recovered from the lungs during the early period of infection and the titer peaked at 1 DPI. Viral proteins were detected from 4 hours to 6 hours DPI. These trends correlate with the up-regulation of mRNA expression of the IFN-α, Mx1, and Mx2 genes that play critical roles in the anti-influenza response at the early stage of infection.
Conclusion
Our results provide evidence that supports the use of cotton rats for the study of influenza virus pathogenesis and the immune response.

Citations

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  • Characterization of humoral immune responses and degree of protection induced by influenza vaccine in cotton rats: Effects of low vaccine dose and single vs booster vaccination
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    Hae-Wol Cho, Chaeshin Chu
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2015; 6(1): 1.     CrossRef
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    Chaeshin Chu, Sunmi Lee
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2015; 6(1): 47.     CrossRef
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PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives