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Debasmita Dubey 3 Articles
Corrigendum to “Statistical Evaluation of Two Microbiological Diagnostic Methods of Pulmonary Tuberculosis After Implementation of a Directly Observed Treatment Short-course Program” [Osong Public Health Res Perspect 2013;4(1):45–51]
Shakti Rath, Debasmita Dubey, Mahesh C. Sahu, Sudhanshu S. Mishra, Rabindra N. Padhy
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2019;10(3):202-202.   Published online June 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2019.10.3.11
  • 2,567 View
  • 32 Download
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In Vitro Antibacterial Activity, Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Woodfordia fruticosa Kurz. Leaf Extract and Host Toxicity Testing With In Vitro Cultured Lymphocytes From Human Umbilical Cord Blood
Debasmita Dubey, Rajashree Patnaik, Goutam Ghosh, Rabindra N. Padhy
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014;5(5):298-312.   Published online October 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2014.08.001
  • 2,042 View
  • 23 Download
  • 14 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
To locate a plant with suitable phytochemicals for use as antimicrobial agents to control multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria as a complementary medicine, without host toxicity as monitored through cultured lymphocytes from human umbilical cord blood.
Methods
The methanol crude leaf extract of the plant Woodfordia fruticosa was subjected to antimicrobial assay in vitro with nine pathogenic MDR bacteria from clinical samples. This was followed by bioassay-guided fractionation with seven non-polar to polar solvents, gas chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis of the n-butanol fraction, and monitoring of the host toxicity of the leaf extract with in vitro grown lymphocytes from human umbilical cord blood.
Results
The leaf extract of W. fruticosa had a controlling capacity for MDR bacteria. The minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration of the n-butanol fraction were < 1.89 mg/mL extract and 9.63 mg/mL extract, respectively. The gas chromatography–mass spectrometry spectrum of the n-butanol fraction confirmed the presence of 13 peaks of different compounds with retention times of 9.11 minutes, 9.72 minutes, 10.13 minutes, 10.78 minutes, 12.37 minutes, 12.93 minutes, 18.16 minutes, 21.74 minutes, 21.84 minutes, 5.96 minutes, 12.93 minutes, 24.70 minutes, and 25.76 minutes. The six leading compounds were: diethyl phthalate: IUPAC name: diethyl benzene-1,2-dicarboxylate; 5-methyl-2-(1-methylethyl) phenol: IUPAC name: 5-methyl-2-propan-2-ylphenol; (E )-3,7-dimethylocta-2,6-diene-1-thiol: IUPAC name: (2Z)-3,7-dimethylocta-2,6-diene-1-thiol; 2,6,10-dodecatrien-1-ol, 3,7,11-trimethyl-, (E,E ): IUPAC name: 2,6,10-dodecatrien-1-ol; 3,7,11-trimethyl-, (E,E); 2-methoxy-4-(2-propenyl) phenol: IUPAC name: 2-methoxy-4-[(1E)-prop-1-en-1-yl]phenol; hexadecanoic acid: IUPAC name: hexadecanoic acid.
Conclusion
The presence of antimicrobial compounds that are therapeutically potent against MDR bacteria was confirmed in W. fruticosa. The crude leaf extract showed no host toxicity with human lymphocytes; the n-butanol fraction of the extract was the most suitable bioactive fraction. The terpenes isolated were: 5-methyl-2-(1-methylethyl) phenol, 2-methoxy-4-(2-propenyl) phenol, 2,6-octadien-1-ol, 3,7-dimethyl-(E)-2,6-octadienal, 3,7-dimethylcyclohexanol, and cyclohexanol, 2-methylene-5-(1-methylethenyl) which were reported to have specifically antimicrobial activity.

Citations

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    Expert Review of Anti-infective Therapy.2022; 20(10): 1351.     CrossRef
  • Woodfordia fruticosa extract nanoemulsion: Influence of processing treatment on droplet size and its assessment for in vitro antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activity
    Agnieszka Najda, Aarti Bains, Joanna Klepacka, Prince Chawla
    Frontiers in Nutrition.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Mohammed Abu Tayab, Kazi Ashfak Ahmed Chowdhury, Md. Jabed, Syed Mohammed Tareq, A. T. M. Mostafa Kamal, Mohammad Nazmul Islam, A. M. Kafil Uddin, Mohammad Adil Hossain, Talha Bin Emran, Jesus Simal-Gandara
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    Clinical Phytoscience.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Assessment of Anti-Inflammatory and Antimicrobial Potential of Ethanolic Extract of Woodfordia fruticosa Flowers: GC-MS Analysis
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    Molecules.2021; 26(23): 7193.     CrossRef
  • Plant-Based Phytochemicals as Possible Alternative to Antibiotics in Combating Bacterial Drug Resistance
    Hana Mohammed Al AlSheikh, Insha Sultan, Vijay Kumar, Irfan A. Rather, Hashem Al-Sheikh, Arif Tasleem Jan, Qazi Mohd Rizwanul Haq
    Antibiotics.2020; 9(8): 480.     CrossRef
  • Ethnomedicinal Uses of Plant Resources in the Machhapuchchhre Rural Municipality of Kaski District, Nepal
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    Andreas Romulo, Ervizal A. M. Zuhud, Johana Rondevaldova, Ladislav Kokoska
    Pharmaceutical Biology.2018; 56(1): 287.     CrossRef
  • GC MS Analysis of One Ayurvedic Preparation ‘Aswagandharishtam
    M. Kotteswari, M. R. K. Rao, Siva Kumar, K. Prabhu, R. Lakshmi Sundaram, Shruthi Dinakar
    Biomedical and Pharmacology Journal.2018; 11(2): 1061.     CrossRef
  • Phytochemical constituents, antioxidant and antibacterial activities of methanolic extract of Ardisia elliptica
    Nazeh M. Al-Abd, Zurainee Mohamed Nor, Marzida Mansor, Asdren Zajmi, Mohd Shahnaz Hasan, Fadzly Azhar, Mustafa Kassim
    Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Biomedicine.2017; 7(6): 569.     CrossRef
  • In vitro antibacterial activity of crude extracts of 9 selected medicinal plants against UTI causing MDR bacteria
    Monali P. Mishra, Sibanarayan Rath, Shasank S. Swain, Goutam Ghosh, Debajyoti Das, Rabindra N. Padhy
    Journal of King Saud University - Science.2017; 29(1): 84.     CrossRef
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    Chitra Somu, Ramaraj Paulchamy, S. M. Moorthy, Janarthanan Sundaram
    Archives of Phytopathology and Plant Protection.2017; 50(17-18): 850.     CrossRef
  • Screening and antibacterial efficacy of selected Indian medicinal plants
    Suresh Mickymaray, Mohammad Saleh Al Aboody, Pradipta Kumar Rath, Panneerselvam Annamalai, Thajuddin Nooruddin
    Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Biomedicine.2016; 6(3): 185.     CrossRef
  • Ellagic acid: Pharmacological activities and molecular mechanisms involved in liver protection
    Wylly Ramsés García-Niño, Cecilia Zazueta
    Pharmacological Research.2015; 97: 84.     CrossRef
Statistical Evaluation of Two Microbiological Diagnostic Methods of Pulmonary Tuberculosis After Implementation of a Directly Observed Treatment Short-course Program
Shakti Rath, Debasmita Dubey, Mahesh C. Sahu, Sudhanshu S. Mishra, Rabindra N. Padhy
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2013;4(1):45-51.   Published online February 28, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2012.12.004
  • 2,243 View
  • 16 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of smear and culture tests of clinical samples of pulmonary tuberculosis after the introduction of the directly observed treatment short-course (DOTS) program.
Methods
Using sputum samples from 572 individuals as a self-selected population, both Ziehl–Neelsen staining and culturing on Lowenstein–Jensen medium were carried out as diagnostic procedures. Using Bayes’ rule, the obtained data set was analyzed.
Results
Of the 572 samples, 33 (0.05769) were true positive (results of both tests positive) cases; 22 samples (0.03846) were false positive (smear test positive and culture test negative) cases; 62 samples (0.10839) were false negative (smear test negative and culture test positive) cases; and 455 samples (0.79545) were true negative (results of both tests negative) cases. Values of test statistics, sensitivity, and specificity were used to compute several inherent other Bayesian test statistics. The a priori probability or prevalence value of tuberculosis in the targeted population was 0.166. The a posteriori probability value computed arithmetically was 0.6614 and that obtained by the graphical method was 0.62.
Conclusions
The smear test was found to be dependable for 95.4% with stable TB infections, and it was not dependable for 34.7% without stable TB infections. The culture test could be regarded as the gold standard for 96.15% as seen with the data set, which was obtained after the implementation of the DOTS program.

Citations

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  • Comprehensive Determination of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Nontuberculous Mycobacteria From Targeted Capture Sequencing
    Ya He, Ziying Gong, Xiaokai Zhao, Daoyun Zhang, Zhongshun Zhang
    Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Primary tuberculosis of the glans penis-a rare case report
    Rajashree Panigrahy, Suren Kumar Das, Subhrajita Rout, Mahesh Chandra Sahu, Rabindra Nath Padhy
    Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Disease.2014; 4: S653.     CrossRef

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives