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Bok-Ghee Han 3 Articles
Inorganic Phosphorus and Potassium Are Putative Indicators of Delayed Separation of Whole Blood
Jae-Eun Lee, Maria Hong, Seul-Ki Park, Ji-In Yu, Jin-Sook Wang, Haewon Shin, Jong-Wan Kim, Bok-Ghee Han, So-Youn Shin
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2016;7(2):90-95.   Published online April 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2015.11.003
  • 1,847 View
  • 15 Download
  • 6 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The delayed separation of whole blood can influence the concentrations of circulating blood components, including metabolites and cytokines. The aim of this study was to determine whether clinical-biochemistry analytes can be used to assess the delayed separation of whole blood.
Methods
We investigated the plasma and serum concentrations of five clinical-biochemistry analytes and free hemoglobin when the centrifugation of whole blood stored at 4°C or room temperature was delayed for 4 hours, 6 hours, 24 hours, or 48 hours, and compared the values with those of matched samples that had been centrifuged within 2 hours after whole-blood collection.
Results
The inorganic phosphorus (IP) levels in the plasma and serum samples were elevated ≥ 1.5-fold when whole-blood centrifugation was delayed at room temperature for 48 hours. Furthermore, the IP levels in the plasma samples showed excellent assessment accuracy [area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve (AUC) > 0.9] after a 48-hour delay in whole-blood separation, and high sensitivity (100%) and specificity (95%) at an optimal cutoff point. The IP levels in the serum samples also exhibited good assessment accuracy (AUC > 0.8), and high sensitivity (81%) and specificity (100%). The potassium (K+) levels were elevated 1.4-fold in the serum samples following a 48-hour delay in whole-blood separation. The K+ levels showed excellent assessment accuracy (AUC > 0.9) following a 48-hour delay in whole-blood separation, and high sensitivity (95%) and specificity (91%) at an optimal cutoff point.
Conclusion
Our study showed that the IP and K+ levels in the plasma or serum samples could be considered as putative indicators to determine whether whole-blood separation had been delayed for extended periods.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Blood Plasma Quality Control by Plasma Glutathione Status
    Tamara Tomin, Natalie Bordag, Elmar Zügner, Abdullah Al-Baghdadi, Maximilian Schinagl, Ruth Birner-Gruenberger, Matthias Schittmayer
    Antioxidants.2021; 10(6): 864.     CrossRef
  • Identification of specific pre-analytical quality control markers in plasma and serum samples
    Luz Ruiz-Godoy, Virginia Enríquez-Cárcamo, Lourdes Suárez-Roa, María Lourdes Lopez-Castro, Abel Santamaría, Mario Orozco-Morales, Ana Laura Colín-González
    Analytical Methods.2019; 11(17): 2259.     CrossRef
  • Proteomics and Lipidomics in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Research: From Mechanistic Insights to Biomarker Identification
    Bjoern Titz, Raffaella Gadaleta, Giuseppe Lo Sasso, Ashraf Elamin, Kim Ekroos, Nikolai Ivanov, Manuel Peitsch, Julia Hoeng
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2018; 19(9): 2775.     CrossRef
  • Impact of Preanalytical Variations in Blood-Derived Biospecimens on Omics Studies: Toward Precision Biobanking?
    Jae-Eun Lee, Young-Youl Kim
    OMICS: A Journal of Integrative Biology.2017; 21(9): 499.     CrossRef
  • Effect of delayed centrifugation of whole blood on serum samples stability
    Massimo Daves, Vincenzo Roccaforte, Michele Giacomi, Monica Riva, Maria Leitner, Stefan Platzgummer, Gertraud Goetsch, Giuseppe Lippi
    La Rivista Italiana della Medicina di Laboratorio .2017; 13(1): 41.     CrossRef
  • Instability of Plasma and Serum Progastrin-Releasing Peptide During Repeated Freezing and Thawing
    Jae-Eun Lee, Jin-Hyun Lee, Maria Hong, Seul-Ki Park, Ji-In Yu, So-Youn Shin, Shine Young Kim
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2016; 7(6): 351.     CrossRef
Instability at Short Tandem Repeats in Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines
Jae-Eun Lee, Eun-Jung Hong, Ji-Hyun Kim, So Youn Shin, Young-Youl Kim, Bok-Ghee Han
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2013;4(4):194-196.   Published online August 31, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.06.003
  • 1,851 View
  • 11 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Epstein Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) are a useful biological resource, however, genomic variations can happen during the generation and immortalization processes of LCLs. The purpose of this study was to identify genomic variations in LCL DNA compared with matched blood DNA using short tandem repeats (STRs) analysis.
Methods
We analyzed 15 STRs with blood DNA and their matched LCL DNA samples from 6645 unrelated healthy individuals.
Results
Mutations (such as repeat variations and triallelic patterns) of 15 STR loci were detected in 612 LCL DNAs (9.2% of total) without mutations in their matched blood DNA. The repeat variations of 15 STRs were detected in 526 LCL DNAs (mutation rate = 0.0792) and triallelic patterns were identified in 123 (mutation rate = 0.0185). Among 15 STRs, the most common repeat variations (n = 214, mutation rate = 0.0322) and triallelic patterns (n = 17, mutation rate = 0.0026) were found at FGA locus.
Conclusion
Our study shows that mutations in STRs can occur during generation and immortalization of LCLs.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Authentication of M14 melanoma cell line proves misidentification of MDA-MB-435 breast cancer cell line
    Christopher Korch, Erin M. Hall, Wilhelm G. Dirks, Margaret Ewing, Mark Faries, Marileila Varella-Garcia, Steven Robinson, Douglas Storts, Jacqueline A. Turner, Ying Wang, Edward C. Burnett, Lyn Healy, Douglas Kniss, Richard M. Neve, Raymond W. Nims, Yvon
    International Journal of Cancer.2018; 142(3): 561.     CrossRef
A Strategic Plan for the Second Phase (2013–2015) of the Korea Biobank Project
Ok Park, Sang Yun Cho, So Youn Shin, Jae-Sun Park, Jun Woo Kim, Bok-Ghee Han
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2013;4(2):107-116.   Published online April 30, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrp.2013.03.006
  • 1,925 View
  • 23 Download
  • 9 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
The Korea Biobank Project (KBP) was led by the Ministry of Health and Welfare to establish a network between the National Biobank of Korea and biobanks run by university-affiliated general hospitals (regional biobanks). The Ministry of Health and Welfare started the project to enhance medical and health technology by collecting, managing, and providing researchers with high-quality human bioresources. The National Biobank of Korea, under the leadership of the Ministry of Health and Welfare, collects specimens through various cohorts and regional biobanks within university hospitals gather specimens from patients. The project began in 2008, and the first phase ended in 2012, which meant that there needed to be a plan for the second phase that begins in 2013. Consequently, professionals from within and outside the project were gathered to develop a plan for the second phase. Under the leadership of the planning committee, six working groups were formed to formulate a practical plan. By conducting two workshops with experts in the six working groups and the planning committee and three forums in 2011 and 2012, they have developed a strategic plan for the second phase of the KBP. This document presents a brief report of the second phase of the project based on a discussion with them.During the first phase of the project (2008–2012), a network was set up between the National Biobank of Korea and 17 biobanks at university-affiliated hospitals in an effort to unify informatics and governance among the participating biobanks. The biobanks within the network manage data on their biospecimens with a unified Biobank Information Management System. Continuous efforts are being made to develop a common standard operating procedure for resource collection, management, distribution, and personal information security, and currently, management of these data is carried out in a somewhat unified manner. In addition, the KBP has trained and educated professionals to work within the biobanks, and has also carried out various publicity promotions to the public and researchers. During the first phase, biospecimens from more than 300,000 participants through various cohorts and biospecimens from more than 200,000 patients from hospitals were collected, which were distributed to approximately 600 research projects.The planning committee for the second phase evaluated that the first phase of the KBP was successful. However, the first phase of the project was meant to allow autonomy to the individual biobanks. The biobanks were able to choose the kind of specimens they were going to collect and the amount of specimen they would set as a goal, as well as being allowed to choose their own methods to manage their biobanks (autonomy). Therefore, some biobanks collected resources that were easy to collect and the resources needed by researchers were not strategically collected. In addition, there was also a low distribution rate to researchers outside of hospitals, who do not have as much access to specimens and cases as those in hospitals. There were also many cases in which researchers were not aware of the KBP, and the distribution processes were not set up to be convenient to the demands of researchers.Accordingly, the second phase of the KBP will be focused on increasing the integration and cooperation between the biobanks within the network. The KBP plans to set goals for the strategic collection of the needed human bioresources. Although the main principle of the first phase was to establish infrastructure and resource collection, the key objective of the second phase is the efficient utilization of gathered resources. In order to fully utilize the gathered resources in an efficient way, distribution systems and policies must be improved. Vitalization of distribution, securing of high-value resource and related clinical and laboratory information, international standardization of resource management systems, and establishment of a virtuous cycle between research and development (R&D) and biobanks are the four main strategies. Based on these strategies, 12 related objectives have been set and are planned to be executed.

Citations

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    Journal of Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Common Data Model and Database System Development for the Korea Biobank Network
    Soo-Jeong Ko, Wona Choi, Ki-Hoon Kim, Seo-Joon Lee, Haesook Min, Seol-Whan Oh, In Young Choi
    Applied Sciences.2021; 11(24): 11825.     CrossRef
  • Next Chapter of the Taiwan Biobank: Sustainability and Perspectives
    Jui-Chu Lin, Li-Kuei Chen, Wesley Wei-Wen Hsiao, Chien-Te Fan, Mei Lan Ko
    Biopreservation and Biobanking.2019; 17(2): 189.     CrossRef
  • A compilation of national plans, policies and government actions for rare diseases in 23 countries
    Neil Khosla, Rodolfo Valdez
    Intractable & Rare Diseases Research.2018; 7(4): 213.     CrossRef
  • The Need for Research Infrastructures: A Narrative Review of Large-Scale Research Infrastructures in Biobanking
    Anthony Larsson
    Biopreservation and Biobanking.2017; 15(4): 375.     CrossRef
  • Development of an Integrated Biospecimen Database among the Regional Biobanks in Korea
    Hyun Sang Park, Hune Cho, Hwa Sun Kim
    Healthcare Informatics Research.2016; 22(2): 129.     CrossRef
  • Biobank Regulation in South Korea
    Won Bok Lee
    Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics.2016; 44(2): 342.     CrossRef
  • The Biobank Economic Modeling Tool (BEMT): Online Financial Planning to Facilitate Biobank Sustainability
    Hana Odeh, Lisa Miranda, Abhi Rao, Jim Vaught, Howard Greenman, Jeffrey McLean, Daniel Reed, Sarfraz Memon, Benjamin Fombonne, Ping Guan, Helen M. Moore
    Biopreservation and Biobanking.2015; 13(6): 421.     CrossRef
  • Current Status, Challenges, Policies, and Bioethics of Biobanks
    Byunghak Kang, Jaesun Park, Sangyun Cho, Meehee Lee, Namhee Kim, Haesook Min, Sooyoun Lee, Ok Park, Bokghee Han
    Genomics & Informatics.2013; 11(4): 211.     CrossRef

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives