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Angie Alexandra Rincón-Real 1 Article
Carbapenem resistance in critically important human pathogens isolated from companion animals: a systematic literature review
Angie Alexandra Rincón-Real, Martha Cecilia Suárez-Alfonso
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2022;13(6):407-423.   Published online December 16, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.24171/j.phrp.2022.0033
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This study aimed to describe the presence and geographical distribution of Gram-negativebacteria considered critical on the priority list of antibiotic-resistant pathogens publishedby the World Health Organization, including carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae,carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter spp., and carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.A systematic review of original studies published in 5 databases between 2010 and 2021 wasconducted, including genotypically confirmed carbapenem-resistant isolates obtained fromcanines, felines, and their settings. Fifty-one articles met the search criteria. Carbapenemresistant isolates were found in domestic canines and felines, pet food, and on veterinarymedical and household surfaces. The review found that the so-called “big five”—that is, the5 major carbapenemases identified worldwide in Enterobacterales (New Delhi metallo-βlactamase, active-on-imipenem, Verona integron-encoded metallo-β-lactamase, Klebsiellapneumoniae carbapenemase, and oxacillin [OXA]-48-like)—and the 3 most importantcarbapenemases from Acinetobacter spp. (OXA-23-like, OXA-40-like, and OXA-58-like) hadbeen detected in 8 species in the Enterobacteriaceae family and 5 species of glucose nonfermenting bacilli on 5 continents. Two publications used molecular analysis to confirmcarbapenem-resistant bacteria transmission between owners and dogs. Isolating criticallyimportant human carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria from domestic canines andfelines highlights the importance of including these animal species in surveillance programsand antimicrobial resistance containment plans as part of the One Health approach.

PHRP : Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives